Audrey McGlinchy

City Hall Reporter

Credit Martin do Nascimento / KUT
Audrey McGlinchy is the City Hall reporter at KUT, covering the Austin City Council and the policies they discuss. She comes to Texas from Brooklyn, where she tried her hand at publishing, public relations and nannying. Audrey holds English and journalism degrees from Wesleyan University and the City University of New York. She got her start in journalism as an intern at KUT Radio during a summer break from graduate school. While completing her master's degree in New York City, she interned at the New York Times Magazine and Guernica Magazine.

Ways to Connect

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

A week ago interim Austin Police Chief Brian Manley was tapped by City Manager Spencer Cronk as the sole finalist to be the city’s new permanent police chief, and now Cronk and the city are engaged in a public input process before possibly bringing on Manley full-time.

Montinique Monroe for KUT

Austin City Council members early this morning did not accept the changes asked for in a citizen-led petition that would have required all comprehensive zoning changes, including CodeNEXT, be put to a public vote. Now council must decide before Aug. 20 whether to put the petition on a November ballot.

Gabriel C. Pérez

Austin voters now have a clearer roadmap for a slate of bond-funded projects intended to relieve congestion and improve city infrastructure on a massive scale.

With little more than a guarantee from the Austin City Council, voters overwhelmingly approved a $720-million mobility-focused bond in 2016. Council voted Thursday to approve a construction plan for some of those projects, which will build out new bike lanes, sidewalks and road redesigns.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

This post has been updated.

The Austin City Council voted unanimously Thursday to rename two streets that had been named for Confederate figures.

Robert E. Lee Road will become Azie Morton Road, after the Austin resident and first African-American U.S. treasurer. Jeff Davis Avenue will be renamed for William Holland, who was born into slavery and became a Travis County commissioner in the late 19th century. He was integral in establishing a school in Austin for disabled children of color.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

An Austin-based conservative think tank has sued the city over its paid sick leave ordinance. The ordinance, which goes into effect Oct. 1, requires all private businesses to provide anywhere from six to eight paid sick days for employees.

Montinique Monroe for KUT

A petition to put rewrites of Austin’s land development code, including CodeNEXT, to a public vote was deemed valid by the City Clerk on Monday.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

When Lewis Conway Jr. was released from prison in 2000 after serving time for manslaughter, the state required him to wear an electronic monitoring device. But nothing fit his ankles.

“So they put the electronic monitor on my wrist,” said Conway, who works on criminal justice issues for the nonprofit Grassroots Leadership. “It was about the size of a baby car on my wrist.”

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Jumping the gun works, it seems.

While city staff were devising a pilot program to govern dockless bikes and scooters, expecting to bring a proposal to council members in June, two companies dropped their electric scooters throughout the city. Now the Austin Transportation Department has proposed fast-tracking approval of the pilot program.

Audrey McGlinchy / KUT

It’s been a year of firsts for Stephanie Culver and Jonathan Brou.

In December, the couple bought their first home in Manor, 15 miles from downtown Austin.

“We couldn’t afford Austin to be honest with you,” said Culver, who bought the home with her boyfriend for about $207,000. “This was in our price range.”

Gabriel C. Pérez

Austin Public Health has released an interactive map showing child care and pre-K facilities throughout Travis County, and indicating which centers have received certain national or state accreditation.  

Council Member Delia Garza said where child care centers are located in the city affects everyone – not just those with young children.

Audrey McGlinchy / KUT

Activists filed a petition with the City Clerk on Thursday in an effort to put all land development code rewrites, including CodeNEXT, to a public vote.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

When Natalie Rogers defines the word "terrorist," she starts with the root.

“It is someone who is trying to invoke terror,” said Rogers, a 36-year-old software engineer in Austin.

To some residents, the serial bomber successfully did that.

Courtesy of Tiffany Clay

Anthony Stephan House, who was killed March 2 in the first of a series of bombings in Austin, was a father and a graduate of Texas State University. According to high school friends, he was quiet, humble and self-assured, even at a young age.

“It was always a no-small-talk-type conversation with him,” said high school friend Kevin Cotton, who now lives in Fort Worth. “I liked that about him.”

Andrea Garcia for KUT

Alberto Orozco probably won’t open his dating apps during SXSW.

Marshall Tidrick for KUTX

To stay safe at music festivals, Liliana Díaz and her friends question one another – constantly.

“Like, ‘Who’s she’s talking to? Who is that? Did she just meet him?… Hey do we know him? Do we not know him?'” 22-year-old Díaz  said Saturday as she wandered around a SXSW party hosted by the Austin-based dating app Bumble.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

When Lauren Johnson started job-hunting in the early 1990s, she walked from business to business filling out applications by hand. “It’ll be so much easier someday when this is all computerized,” she remembers thinking.

Audrey McGlinchy / KUT

An anti-CodeNEXT group says it has enough signatures to ask residents whether they should have the right to vote on major changes to Austin's land development code.

Jorge Sanhueza Lyon / KUT

After passing rules that require all private employers to offer workers six to eight paid sick days a year, the City of Austin has agreed to extend its own policy to all local government employees. Previously, temporary employees, like lifeguards and crossing guards, were not covered.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Has a foreign government infiltrated the CodeNEXT process?

Well, no one’s saying that. But in his annual State of the City address on Tuesday, Austin Mayor Steve Adler said the "alleged Russian infiltration" on our nation’s politics has inflamed divisions across the country – and highlighted rifts at the local level, as well.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Austin Mayor Steve Adler will give his 2018 State of the City address Tuesday evening. We’re not sure what he’ll say, but read through Adler’s three previous speeches and you’ll find more than one theme or phrase repeated.

So, to help you follow along – and to add some excitement to what is usually a dry event – we’ve created several State of the City BINGO (though, we replaced B-I-N-G-O with A-D-L-E-R – because, duh) cards. Print them out or play online (click to highlight a square). You can also turn it into a drinking game, although KUT would never promote alcohol consumption.

Jorge Sanhueza Lyon / KUT

Austin City Council members voted early Friday to require all private employers in the city to provide employees at least six to eight days of paid sick leave, depending on the size of the company. 

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Mornings at Hoover’s Cooking are spent hammering beef to make it thin enough for the restaurant’s best-selling dish: chicken fried steak.

“Other things that are good sellers are our fried catfish … and pork chops,” said Hoover Alexander, who has owned the restaurant on Manor Road since 1998.

Martin do Nascimento / KUT

On Feb. 8, 2016, Austin Police Officer Geoffrey Freeman fatally shot 17-year-old David Joseph. Four months later, a Travis County grand jury declined to indict the officer for his death.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Since 2000, the City of Austin has had a lot of ideas about how to slow down gentrification. A task force recommended in 2002, for example, that the city educate residents about available property tax exemptions. In 2008, City Council members asked the city manager to find city-owned land suitable for affordable housing.

Callie Hernandez / KUT

Austin City Council members have made official the hiring of Spencer Cronk as the new city manager. The vote Thursday was unanimous and without debate.

Cronk, the current city administrator in Minneapolis, will start Feb. 12. Interim City Manager Elaine Hart will return to her previous job as chief financial officer.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Austin’s Equity Office is considering how to make good on a report published last April that laid out more than 200 recommendations for how the city can combat institutional racism.

Gabriel C. Pérez

Once a week, KUT listeners hear an ominous recording.

“This is a test of the capital area warning system,” says a male voice, followed by a sequence of blaring tones. It’s not quite as unnerving as getting a smartphone alert that a ballistic missile is headed for your state, but it can still be jarring.

Courtesy of the City of Austin

When incoming City Manager Spencer Cronk moves to Austin next month, he'll have some help. 

Austin City Council members are scheduled to vote Thursday on a compensation package for Cronk, who is coming from Minneapolis and starts Feb. 12.

Martin do Nascimento / KUT

By March, all Austin patrol officers will be wearing body cameras, according to estimates by the Austin Police Department. Currently, 658 body cameras are in use; another 200 will be added.

“After that, we’ll be looking to [give them to other] units throughout the department,” said Cmdr. Brent Dupre, who heads the department’s technology unit.

Campaign finance reports reveal that Austin Mayor Steve Adler is the only member of the City Council who has begun seriously fundraising for re-election.

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