Michael Marks

AgriLife Today/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Raising cattle anywhere is hard, but it’s especially hard in the Rio Grande Valley. And that’s thanks to fever ticks. They can spread a fatal disease that decimated cattle herds through the 1900s and is still feared today. And it’s not just the ticks themselves that can cause headaches, but the regulations designed to control them.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT News

From Texas Standard: 

You may have heard that term ‘heat advisory’ quite a bit during this latest heat wave. It’s a notice the National Weather Service sends out to tell people that they need to take precautions to stay safe in the heat – especially people who work outside.

In the Dallas Fort Worth Area, a heat index of 105 degrees triggers a heat advisory. And the reason it’s 105 degrees has to do with geography and, well, you. 

From Texas Standard.

When Jessica McClure, an 18-month-old girl in Midland, was stuck in a well for 58 hours in October of 1987, CNN carried most of the rescue effort live. There was an international sigh of relief when a crew of roughnecks and first responders finally brought Baby Jessica to the surface.

Gabriel C. Pérez/KUT

From Texas Standard.

Women make up only about 20 percent of the worldwide oil and gas workforce, according to a 2017 study by the Boston Consulting Group and the World Petroleum Council.

KUT News

From Texas Standard.

There’s nothing new about plastic straws. They’ve been around for decades. But there has been a recent backlash against them.

Eric Hamerman, a marketing professor and expert in consumer behavior at Iona College in New York, says the change has to do with a new awareness of our impact on the environment.

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center/Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Most of President Donald Trump's attention this week has been occupied by the southern border. But on Monday, he took some time to address his plans for another frontier: the great beyond. He said it’s not only important for the United States to be present in space, but to be dominant.

Ken Piorkowski/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard.

Danny Bible is scheduled to die on June 27. He was sentenced to death in 2003 for murdering Houston resident Inez Deaton in 1979. Bible’s attorney, Jeremy Schepers, recently filed a lawsuit alleging that a lethal injection would almost certainly constitute cruel and unusual punishment. Schepers is a federal public defender in the Northern District of Texas.

Steven Depolo/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard.

For the next month, the eyes of the soccer world will be on Russia, the site of the 2018 FIFA World Cup. The 32-team tournament, which does not include the United States, will decide which country will reign over the world’s game for the next four years. Every soccer fan has their prediction of who will win the cup, but nobody could tell you for sure, right?

Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

From Texas Standard.

Before sunrise on July 16, 1945, a bomb exploded in the New Mexico desert. It was a new weapon so powerful that at the time it almost seemed like science fiction – the atomic bomb. Scientists built it in a secluded laboratory in Los Alamos where physicists from around the world hoped to invent something strong enough to end World War II – maybe even all wars.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT

From Texas Standard.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5 to 4 on Monday that it was OK for Ohio to remove people from voter registration rolls if those voters skip a few elections and then fail to respond to a notice from election officials. Ohio claimed this was necessary for the proper upkeep of voter registration lists and to prevent voter fraud.

Republicans have been pushing for such restrictions without much actual evidence of fraud, while Democrats have often seen such moves as attempts to suppress voting. What does the ruling mean for Texas?

Wikimedia Commons

From Texas Standard.

Last week, the Illinois State Legislature ratified the Equal Rights Amendment, an addition to the U.S. Constitution that would provide protection from discrimination based on sex.

Public Domain Photos.net

From Texas Standard.

More than 40 percent of Texas is in some stage of drought right now, according to the latest data from the U.S. Drought Monitor. Some parts of the state are especially dry, like the Panhandle and the plains south of the area. That has caused some farmers and ranchers to face difficult choices – like what to do with cattle when there’s not enough grass to graze.

Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

From Texas Standard.

For 20 years, Rafael Palmeiro terrorized major league pitchers. The hard-hitting left-hander from Miami by way of Cuba is one of only six players to record over 3,000 hits and 500 home runs in his career. That’s part of a resume that could make most ball players proud.

Stephen Bieda/Twitter

From Texas Standard.

As everyone in the Panhandle knows, it’s wildfire season. Just southeast of Amarillo in Armstrong County, a blaze called the Mallard Fire has consumed over 75,000 acres. It’s mostly contained now, but last Friday, the flames were so out of control that they even affected the weather.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT News

From Texas Standard.

On October 2, 1989, the Texas Supreme Court ruled unanimously that the state’s school finance system was unequal. The case was Edgewood ISD versus Kirby, pitting San Antonio’s Edgewood Independent School District against the state education commissioner at the time, William Kirby.

Lee Leblanc/Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard.

In Lawrence Wright’s new book “God Save Texas,” he begins his ode to the Lone Star State with a place that may be among the most Texan of all retailers – Buc-ees. That little beaver in the logo may be cute, but it’s got teeth. A lawyer for the roadside destination told a federal jury Tuesday that San Antonio-based Choke Canyon Bar-B-Q is using a similar cartoon critter in its logo to confuse drivers into pulling off the highway to shop at its travel stop instead.

Daphne Zaras/NSSL

From Texas Standard.

Tornadoes have an unmistakable sound – but scientists are learning that the tornado also makes other sounds that you can’t hear. That’s what has seized the interest of Brian Elbing, because those inaudible sounds could save lives.

Flickr/Thomas Hawk (CC BY-NC 2.0)

From Texas Standard.

Some people are convinced that hypnosis is real: they’ve seen it done, they’ve experienced being hypnotized. But is it science? Is it so reliable that we should be able to use it to help make life or death decisions? Two death row inmates have had their sentences delayed as they make the case that they were convicted on the basis of evidence obtained through hypnosis. They say – and other states would agree – that amounts to junk science.

Ed Schipul/Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard.

Last week, one writer described the hysteria and and hype in Houston right now as on a scale somewhere between anticipation for the Super Bowl and the new Avengers movie. So to say Houstonians and Texans further afield are pumped for what starts Monday night in Space City may be an understatement as the hometown Rockets take on the Golden State Warriors in the first game of the NBA’s western conference finals.

JBColorado/Flickr (CC BY-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard.

Summer is coming. The kids are about to get out of school, and that means trips to the pool. In Texas, there is one pool that stands above the rest – the pool at Balmorhea State Park, a true desert oasis. Generations of Texans have gone west to cool off in the spring-fed pool near the foothills of the Davis Mountains. This year, there’s a problem, though.

The Hathi Trust Digital Library/Wikimedia Commons [Public domain]

From Texas Standard.

It’s time once again for what they call the most exciting two minutes in sports. The 144th running of the Kentucky Derby will happen this Saturday.

Credits: NASA / Lockheed Martin

From Texas Standard.

A flight from Dallas to London takes about nine hours on average – not bad, considering it's 4,800 miles away. But imagine cutting that travel time in half. That’s the promise of supersonic flight – a plane moving faster than the speed of sound. It’s not only possible; it’s also been done commercially before.

City of Amarillo

From Texas Standard.

At Amarillo City Council meetings, clapping is a sign of rebellion. And citizens are called out for doing it.

Mayor Ginger Nelson recently enforced the city’s no clapping policy.

Photo courtesy of San Antonio Conservation Society

From Texas Standard.

This is the third story in a three-part series about HemisFair ’68. For part one, click here. For part two, click here.

Today, if you stand at the site where San Antonio held a World’s Fair 50 years ago, you’ll see structures that define San Antonio, like the Tower of the Americas, for one. What you won’t see, though, are too many remnants of what used to be there – what was cleared away for the fair to take place.

Courtesy of UTSA Libraries Special Collections at ITC

From Texas Standard.

This is the second story in a three-part series about HemisFair ’68. For part one, click here.

50 years ago this week San Antonio kicked off its world’s fair – HemisFair ‘68. Thursday, we brought you the story of how HemisFair turned San Antonio into the city we know today. It’s no small miracle that the fair even happened in the first place.

Flickr/Raleigh Meade (CC BY-NC 2.0)

From Texas Standard.

There’s a saying that every Texan has two hometowns: their own, and San Antonio. Historically, culturally and personally – somehow all Texans have a connection to the Alamo City. But as we learn in the first of a three-part series on the 50th anniversary of HemisFair ’68, San Antonio hasn’t always been the modern, tourist-ready town it is today. Getting there involved a few growing pains – and a massive party.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT News

From Texas Standard.

Teachers have walked off the job in West Virginia, Kentucky, and Oklahoma – and there are rumblings that Arizona could be next. Their demands in each state vary, but they can be boiled down to wanting a bigger piece of the pie, either for themselves or the schools they work in.

U.S. Air Force photo/Stephen Najjar

From Texas Standard.

One of the staples of elementary school library shelves across Texas is Hank the Cowdog – the dog who fancies himself the “head of ranch security” at the M-Cross Ranch in the Panhandle. Since 1983, Hank has solved mysteries, fended off coyotes, and pined for the affection of the ranch’s collie, Beulah.

Carol M. Highsmith/Wikimedia Commons

From Texas Standard.

In 1978, the CBS TV network took a chance on broadcasting a five-episode miniseries about the schemes and struggles of a Texas family. Five shows – that’s all there were 40 years ago. But people loved it. So, CBS brought the series back for 24 more episodes. By then, America was hooked.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

From Texas Standard.

Mayors and city councils along the Gulf Coast didn’t have a lot of time to make decisions during Hurricane Harvey. The situation on the ground changed almost constantly as wave after wave of rain doused their cities. But some of those local officials say their response was impaired by a law meant to keep their communities better-informed: the Texas Open Meetings Act. It requires a certain amount of advance public notice before a meeting – something officials say slowed their decision-making during the storm. This week they brought those claims to the Texas Legislature.

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