Nadia Hamdan

Jason Hlavenka/Flickr

An advisory committee is expected to recommend today that the Texas State Board of Education remove the word "heroic" from social studies curriculum when referring to defenders of the Alamo.

Courtesy of SKAM Austin

SKAM Austin is a typical teen drama in a lot of ways. There are hookups, breakups, cattiness and plenty of awkwardness. But, while the drama itself may walk a well-tread path, the path the show takes to reach its viewers is anything but. 

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

President Trump’s decision to roll back Obama-era guidelines supporting race-based college admissions could mean another legal challenge for UT Austin.

Since the university began factoring race and ethnicity into its admissions in 2003, UT says it has increased student body diversity.  But it has also been embroiled in a continual court battle over the legality of affirmative action – a battle that could end if Brett Kavanaugh fills the soon-to-be-vacant seat on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT News

Round Rock-based Dell Technologies is going public again after operating for five years as a private company. The $21.7 billion deal, announced Monday, was approved by the boards of Dell and VMware on Sunday night. VMware is the networking software company Dell acquired when it bought EMC.

Julia Reihs / KUT

Capital Metro recently ended a pilot program that would improve the way blind people use the bus system. It involves an app that uses voiceover technology to give people real-time transportation information while guiding them step-by-step to the nearest bus stop.

Montinique Monroe for KUT

Homeowners in a Del Valle suburb learned last month that their insurance rates could go up as much as $1,000 this year because they're too far from the nearest fire station.

Concerns about the rising rates has jumpstarted a push to get fire stations built across the city. The Austin City Council voted in 2016 to build five new stations in underserved neighborhoods, but little has been done since then to fulfill that promise.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Young women molested by Larry Nassar, the disgraced former USA Gymnastics team doctor, called on Texas to pursue criminal and civil charges against the owners of the Karolyi Ranch, a Huntsville facility that hosted the women's national team for decades.

Andrea Garcia for KUT

A UT Austin program aimed at expanding ideas of masculinity has been put on hold after conservative media outlets accused it of treating masculinity as a mental health issue.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

At 3 percent, the unemployment rate in Central Texas is one of the lowest in the country. But most of the jobs driving that low rate require higher skilled workers, and roughly two-thirds of job seekers here don't fall into that category.

Julia Reihs / KUT

You can't not notice the trees that line the paths on Austin's many hike and bike trails. But have you ever noticed a fair amount of them are numbered? They're on small metal tags nailed to the trunks.

Writer Will Neely noticed them while he was running along the Butler Hike and Bike Trail, so he asked about it for our ATXplained project, a series where KUT answers questions about life in Austin.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The University of Texas released a study last year that detailed how prevalent sexual assault and misconduct was on campus. UT President Greg Fenves called the report “a wake-up call” and promised to make improvements.

A year later, the school is focusing more on helping students navigate the process. 

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

An oxygen-deprived “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico would take decades to reverse, according to a study from the University of Waterloo in Canada.

Montinique Monroe for KUT

Roughly 10,000 people marched from Austin’s City Hall to the steps of the Texas State Capitol on Saturday, rallying in response to a student-led movement demanding stricter gun laws. It was one of more than 800 “March for Our Lives” protests happening across the country. 

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

SXSW Music often prides itself on its international flavor, but for some international bands, like Tijuana Bibles, it can be an expensive trip.

The Glaswegian post-punk band is in town for its first SXSW and will be playing a few shows throughout the week – just last night they played a showcase for artists from Glasgow at Hotel Vegas.

But all of that almost didn’t happen because of how much it costs to attend SXSW.

Gabriel C. Pérez

Immigrants in Texas are committing fewer crimes proportionally than natural-born citizens, according to a new report from the Washington, D.C.-based Cato Institute.

Researchers with the libertarian think-tank used 2015 data from the Texas Department of Public Safety to measure the criminal conviction and arrest rates of three groups: illegal immigrants, legal immigrants and native-born Americans.

Austin Price for KUT

Three of the deadliest mass shootings in modern U.S. history have happened in the last five months. The most recent was just last week, when a gunman opened fire at a high school in Parkland, Fla.

Seventeen people were killed.

It’s easy to feel helpless in a situation like this, but one pre-med student at UT Austin says there is something people can do, and she’s making it her mission to train everyone on campus.

Martin do Nascimento / KUT

Austin police officers aren't the only public safety personnel without an employment contract with the city. For the first time in nearly 10 years, EMS employees are without a contract, too.

Tony Marquardt, president of the Austin-Travis County EMS Employee Association, said that because police is the largest of the public safety departments, it overshadowed emergency medical services.

NASA

An associate professor of astronomy at UT-Austin will lead a study using the powerful successor to NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

The $8 billion James Webb Space Telescope, which is expected to launch in 2019, is said to be 100 times better than the Hubble. It will have a much larger telescope mirror, allowing scientists to see much fainter objects in greater detail.

Martin do Nascimento / KUT

Austin City Council will not release the names of the finalists vying for the vacant city manager position today.

Council members went to great lengths to keep the selection process secretive last week. After criticism, the council, candidates and the search firm tasked with finding a city manager agreed to make the names public by no later than today. Mayor Steve Adler said that reveal will have to wait – as one of the five candidates has dropped out of the running. 

Lynda Gonzalez / KUT

If you travel just an hour outside Austin, there’s a place that starkly contrasts with the so-called “Live Music Capital of the World.” East on Highway 71 toward Bastrop, the sounds of Austin fade and all you’re left with are acres of untouched land, as far as the eye can see. If you take a right turn here, a left turn there, you’ll find yourself at the gates of a cemetery.

Nida Rehman, courtesy of Mu Delta Alpha

At first glance, Mu Delta Alpha might seem like any Greek organization on UT-Austin’s campus.

It has letters, colors – teal, white and peach – and had rush week last month. While that may be pretty typical for a sorority, Mu Delta Alpha is different. It’s the first Muslim sorority on the University of Texas campus.


Lynda Gonzalez for KUT

When you think of the oldest festival in Austin, you’d be forgiven for not immediately thinking of falafel and Arabic music.

But that’s what you get at the St. Elias Mediterranean Food Festival, which celebrated its 85th year in Austin over the weekend. 

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Austin resident Richard Overton, the oldest known living World War II veteran, is getting a free home upgrade.

Meals on Wheels Central Texas has partnered with The Home Depot Foundation to repair the homes of veterans around the country. At 111, Overton is one of their oldest clients. He built his home in the late 1940s after returning home from the war and has lived there ever since.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

It’s the final week of classes at Harris Elementary. UT graduate student Kim ​Canuette Grimaldi is meeting with her students one last time before summer vacation. Second- and third-graders Amira and Sajeda, both from Sudan, sit across from her at a small, half-moon-shaped table. While they’re working on multiplication, Amira starts sounding out the word on ​Canuette Grimaldi’s shirt.

A sticker there reads “mentor.”