Rebecca McInroy

Credit Martin do Nascimento

Rebecca McInroy is an award-winning show creator, host, and executive producer for KUT, KUTX and KUT.ORG.

Rebecca believes it is important that Public Media directly connects with the community it serves. Many of her programs combine the talent, and knowledge of the Austin community with the production arm of KUT/X Public Media to produce content that bridges the gap between the public and higher education.

She can be heard co-hosting the fortnightly food politics podcast The Secret Ingredient with food and agriculture corresponded for Mother Jones, Tom Philpott, and Raj Patel of the LBJ School of Public Affairs.

She is also the creator, executive producer, and host of the live discussion program in Austin, Texas Views and Brews.

She is the creator, executive producer, and editor of the national weekly radio program Two Guys on Your Head hosted by professors Art Markman and Bob Duke.

With her most recent projects she is the executive producer and editor of the documentary series Stuart Hall: In Conversations with host Dr. Ben Carrington about the life and legacy of the cultural theorist Stuart Hall, and the executive producer of This is Just To Say a podcast about poetry hosted by poet and novelist Carrie Fountain.

McInroy’s other programs include: The Write Up with Owen Egerton; In Perspective; and Liner Notes.

Ways to Connect

There are many reasons we might not be happy with the decisions we make, but it turns out not many of them have to do with the actual choice. In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about the psychology of disappointment.

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about the psychology behind both sides of America's ongoing debate about firearms and gun control.

On this special edition of This is Just To Say, poet and novelist Carrie Fountain and KUT's Rebecca McInroy share Naomi Shihab Nye's poem "Kindness" and discuss the importance of poetry today.


In this special edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Rebecca McInroy talk about the psychology of the current moment in Austin and how to negotiate moving forward following the traumatic events of this month.

Poet and novelist Carrie Fountain talks with poet Victoria Chang with about how her poem "Obit" allowed her to process the death of her mother.

It seems that people today carry with them the constant mantra "I'm so busy." It can be tough to juggle work, kids and life in general, but a lot of that feeling of being overwhelmed may be our own fault.

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markaman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about the value of boredom, and how to get the most out of your downtime to feel more in control and less stressed.

Poet Aimee Nezhukumatathil talks with poet and novelist Carrie Fountain about reclaiming the power, beauty and wonder of a C-section birth through her poem  "Self-Portrait as C-Section Scar."


We might think that to keep order in our households, workplaces or classrooms, it's important to hold people accountable for their negative behavior. But that can lead to a playing field that allows for either nothing to happen or punishment. It is more important to focus on the behaviors we want to see continue, as opposed to giving energy to avoiding the negative.

Still a little confused? In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about the psychology of accountability.

Host poet and novelist Carrie Fountain talks with poet Tarfia Faizullah about how the loss of her sister in a car accident influenced her poem "West Texas Nocturne."

Tearing down something is quick, easy and often gratifying. What's more time-consuming and difficult is creating, building and constructing. As Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about in this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, however, the reasons why we are more likely to criticize than create aren't just about effort.


Poet Maggie Smith talks about her poem "The Mother" with poet and novelist Carrie Fountain.


It might seem odd that anyone still treks out to see live theater – given that we have so much on-demand entertainment at our fingertips every day through streaming services or television.

However, as Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke discuss in this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, psychologically we may get more from a visit to our local playhouse than we think.

We were as transfixed as you were by the Westminster Dog Show. So on this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about why we want to know what our lovely pups are thinking.

Poet Diane Seuss talks with poet and novelist Carrie Fountain about how writing her poem "Song in My Heart" gave her strength after a devastating divorce.

In this edition of This Is Just To Say, poet and novelist Carrie Fountain talks with poet Carl Phillips about his poem "White Dog."


There are a lot of factors that help to regulate our overall health and wellness. If we are content in our lives and relationships, we are more likely to be healthy.

If we exercise and eat well, we reap the benefits in our mind and body. Also, as recent studies by Ted Kaptchuck and others show, if we take medications or supplements, even if they're nothing but rice powder and sugar, we can feel better.

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about why taking placebos somehow makes us feel healthier.

Poet and novelist Carrie Fountain talks with poet Matthew Zapruder about the collaboration that inspired his poem "Frankenstein Love" from his collection Come On All You Ghosts (2010).


Because we know how things work, sometimes we think we understand why these things work as they do. That can be a problem.

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about the difference between "how" and "why" knowledge, and why it's important to recognize what you really need to know.


When thinking about how we present ourselves, at a job interview, for example, we might think that the more good stuff we tell the prospective employer, the better. That's not really the case, however. Our best assets can be overshadowed by the average of all we present.

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about The Presenter's Paradox, and how we can put our best foot forward.

Jessica Attie

In this edition of This Is Just To Say, poet and novelist Carrie Fountain talks with Palestinian-American poet Naomi Shihab Nye.

Nye reads her poem "Burning the Old Year," and they continue to explore the idea of what we take with us and what we leave behind as we enter 2018 through W.S. Merwin's "To the Mistakes."


Last month on All Things Considered, NPR's Kelly McEvers and Pop Culture Happy Hour's Linda Holmes and Glen Weldon talked about this era of TV and movies, many of which are remakes or reboots catering nostalgic audiences.

Weldon asserted that nostalgia is rooted in things you choose to enjoy.

We generally tend to pay more attention to outcomes rather than process. Yet, if we really want to learn from our mistakes or our successes, it's important to take a step-by-step look at our decision-making processes.

On this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke take on outcome bias.


The Greek philosopher Heraclitus is noted as having said, "No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it’s not the same river and he’s not the same man.” But what does that mean for us today?

On this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about how and why we change over time, and why it's important to have compassion for our former selves in order to become better people in the future.

When it comes to mindfulness, there is clear evidence that practicing it can be beneficial, but perhaps not for everyone all the time. It might even have some adverse effects on memory.

In our final piece in our series on mindfulness, Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman, and Dr. Bob Duke talk about mindfulness and memory.

There are many benefits to mindfulness, but it might not be for everyone.

On this week's edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about the more negative elements of being present.


When was the last time someone said to you, "Just take a breath?" It's a way to slow down, be in the moment, create space. It's also a big part of a mindfulness trend.

As Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about in this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, there are a lot of psychological reasons for why and how mindfulness works, and you don't have to buy a yoga mat and incense to reap the benefits.


For many of us, Thanksgiving means spending time with our families, carrying out traditions that we’ve practiced for years.

While it can be stressful, messy and challenging to spend time with family members you don’t see very often, it can also be a beautiful time of re-centering.

Have you ever told someone, "Hey, I read that book!" then continued with a guilty, "Well, I listened to the audio version." 

It's time to wash that guilt right out of your soul, because in this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke, talk about how our brains process information differently based on how we consume it.


In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about the psychology of political polarization.

On a recent Views and Brews at The Cactus Cafe, Dr. Art Markman, and Dr. Bob Duke talked about how to process tragedy through media in uncertain times.

You can listen to the full conversation here, but we wanted to bring you a bit of it on this week's edition of Two Guys on Your Head.


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