Rebecca McInroy

Credit Martin do Nascimento

Rebecca McInroy is an award-winning show creator, host, and executive producer for KUT, KUTX and KUT.ORG.

Rebecca believes it is important that Public Media directly connects with the community it serves. Many of her programs combine the talent, and knowledge of the Austin community with the production arm of KUT/X Public Media to produce content that bridges the gap between the public and higher education.

She can be heard co-hosting the fortnightly food politics podcast The Secret Ingredient with food and agriculture corresponded for Mother Jones, Tom Philpott, and Raj Patel of the LBJ School of Public Affairs.

She is also the creator, executive producer, and host of the live discussion program in Austin, Texas Views and Brews.

She is the creator, executive producer, and editor of the national weekly radio program Two Guys on Your Head hosted by professors Art Markman and Bob Duke.

With her most recent projects she is the executive producer and editor of the documentary series Stuart Hall: In Conversations with host Dr. Ben Carrington about the life and legacy of the cultural theorist Stuart Hall, and the executive producer of This is Just To Say a podcast about poetry hosted by poet and novelist Carrie Fountain.

McInroy’s other programs include: The Write Up with Owen Egerton; In Perspective; and Liner Notes.

Ways to Connect

healthmeup.com

When it comes to the Myers-Briggs personality type test, are you an introvert or an extrovert? Do you focus on sensing, or do you use your intuition to interpret information that you absorb? 

Does it matter?  Why is it so entertaining and satisfying for some people to answer these questions about themselves and others in their lives? 

Listen to the show and let the Two Guys, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke, demystify the wiry world of  personality tests for you.

There’s endless questions we could ask about how the brain works. A particularly interesting one: what's unique about the brain during adolescence?

During adolescence our brains are wired differently than adult brains will be – and for good reason. In adolescence our brains are in a process of development – so we’re less inhibited, allowing us to take the risks we need to learn about the world. In addition, the difference in brain physiology has other ramifications on behavior and needs. Ignoring them can make life more difficult for kids and parents.

sharpschool.com

Are you an auditory learner or a visual learner?  If you answered "yes" you would be right. That's because we use all our senses to learn and process information.

In this edition of Two Guys On Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke dispel the myths behind learning styles preferences: they don’t really exist. 

Our reliance on the theories of learning styles to explain our success or failure of understanding certain information is actually serving our human need to put things into categories – combined with our need to explain things when they don’t work. 

blog.ifabbo.com

When it comes to what humans find attractive, many factors play a role.

Evolutionarily speaking, we tend to be attracted to symmetry and markers that indicate health and wellness. In social terms it has more to do with what’s in fashion at a given moment. But it's when we begin to react to attractiveness that things get tricky.

hongkiat.com

The part of our brains that is responsible for generating creativity evolved throughout human existence to serve a problem-solving function. 

If you lived in the great, wild, open world as a primitive human, and your problems were things like predators, or food security sources, or a need for shelter, what would your brain do? 

Your brain would concoct creative strategies to solve those problems, and that’s what our minds have built a capacity to do as we’ve evolved – create solutions. Drs. Art Markman and Bob Duke give you more of the details.

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