Gerrymandering

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Texas Democrats are campaigning on the issue of how lawmakers draw political maps ahead of the 2018 elections. They say partisan gerrymandering is solely a state issue right now, because the U.S. Supreme Court didn't rule this term on whether the practice is legal.    

Todd Wiseman / The Texas Tribune

The 2018 elections will move forward without any tweaks to Texas' political maps.

Following the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling to uphold all but one of the state's political districts, a three-judge federal panel in San Antonio on Tuesday ordered that the state's maps should stay in place for this year's elections despite outstanding issues with House District 90.

Gabriel C. Pérez

Civil rights attorneys say the Supreme Court's decision Monday in a Texas redistricting case showed how difficult it is to prove discrimination in voting laws.

The Supreme Court mostly sided with Republican lawmakers in the case, which challenged state House and congressional maps. Plaintiffs had argued lawmakers intentionally discriminated against minorities when they drew up the maps.

Shelby Knowles for The Texas Tribune

The U.S. Supreme Court partially upheld Texas’ political maps in a 5-4 ruling today.

The U.S. Supreme Court punted Monday on its biggest decision of its term so far. The justices had been expected to rule on the limits of partisan gerrymandering.

Instead, the court sidestepped the major issues on technical grounds, sending the issue back to the lower courts for further examination.

Erik Hersman/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

2018 could shape up to be a big year in the fight over partisan and racial gerrymandering. Cases involving redistricting are on the docket in the Supreme Court as well as other federal courts. And if you've ever looked at a map of Texas congressional districts, you know these court decisions will have implications in the Lone Star State.

Shelby Knowles for The Texas Tribune

The U.S. Supreme Court announced today it won’t be hearing a challenge to the state’s political maps from the Texas Democratic Party. In a lawsuit, Democrats claimed state lawmakers drew political boundaries in 2011 in favor of Republicans.

Jeff Kubina/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard.

Last August a panel of three federal judges ruled that Texas congressional and state house maps needed to be redrawn. The judges ruled the maps discriminate against voters of color. Now the nation’s highest court will hear the case.

Shelby Knowles for The Texas Tribune

The U.S. Supreme Court announced today that it will hear both of Texas’ redistricting appeals. The state’s congressional and statehouse maps were struck down by federal courts last year after judges ruled they intentionally discriminated against minorities.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Gov. Greg Abbott told a radio program Wednesday he plans to appeal to the Supreme Court a federal ruling that could force state lawmakers to redraw two congressional districts in Texas before the 2018 elections.