Life & Arts

Entertainment, live performance, food, cuisine, dining, theater, film, television, art, broadcasting, SXSW, and other arts and culture news in and around Austin and the Central Texas counties of Travis, Hays, Caldwell, Bastrop and Williamson

The Best Songs Ever ... This Week, July 20, 2018

Jul 20, 2018
Lynda Gonzalez for KUTX

The staff at our sister station KUTX scour the earth to bring listeners the best music. Each Friday, they share three of their favorite songs on Morning Edition.

Blanton Museum of Art

The City, by Texan artist Vincent Valdez is presented in two parts. The smaller of the two pieces, The City II, depicts a pile of mattresses and garbage in gray scale. The larger, less pedestrian, piece is a 30-foot-long mural, sprawled across four canvases, depicting a meeting of the Ku Klux Klan.

The StoryCorps mobile booth was in Austin in January, and we’re bringing you some of the stories that were recorded there. Locally recorded stories will air on Monday mornings during Morning Edition and archived here.

Pilar Sanchez was joined in the mobile booth by her husband, John Hernandez. They talked about the different ways they raised and how they’re raising their eight-year-old daughter, Victoria, who joined them in the booth. They all also weighed in on the correct pronunciation of Pilar’s first name.

"I hadn't painted in almost twenty years," says Robert Kane Herrera. "[For La Raza] was.. one of the last murals I ever painted." Together with fellow artist Oscar Cortez, Herrera created For La Raza in 1992. This year, the two were hired by Austin's Art in Public Places Program to restore the beloved eastside mural.

Twenty years ago, with a young but growing family, Herrera stopped painting to pursue steadier and better-paying work as electrician. Now that his kids are older, he's got a little more time in his schedule to get back to his artistic roots. "I get to be me again," he says. "Or at least who I thought I was."

Eddie Gaspar/KUTX

The staff at our sister station KUTX scour the earth to bring listeners the best music. Each Friday, they share three of their favorite songs on Morning Edition.

"We initially came up with the idea just as a joke," says producer/performer Linzy Beltran, who created the female-led jazz and comedy show Jazz Kween with Sarah Marine and Jessica Pyrdsa. "We were like, 'Oh, we should be Jazz Queens' ... because Sarah's from New Orleans and Jess is a musician and I do a lot of comedy in town."

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Dr. Mary Frances Berry, the Geraldine R. Segal Professor of American Social Thought, professor of history at the University of Pennsylvania, former chairwoman of the United States Commission on Civil Rights, and author of History Teaches Us to Resist: How Progressive Movements Have Succeeded in Challenging Times.  

"It's the second in a trilogy of dances with Austin Aquatics," says Forklift Danceworks artistic director Allison Orr, speaking about this weekend's production of Dove Springs Swims. Last summer, Forklift partnered with the city's aquatics division to present Bartholomew Swims, and next summer they'll stage a third performance at a yet-to-be-named east Austin pool.

The StoryCorps mobile booth was in Austin in January, and we’re bringing you some of the stories that were recorded there. Locally recorded stories will air on Monday mornings during Morning Edition and archived here.

Ellie Patel sat down in the StoryCorps mobile booth with her longtime best friend, Les McLain. Ellie, who is now a labor and delivery nurse, shares the story of giving birth at age seventeen and giving that baby up for adoption.

The Best Songs Ever ... This Week, July 6, 2018

Jul 6, 2018
KUTX

The staff at our sister station KUTX scour the earth to bring listeners the best music. Each Friday, they share three of their favorite songs on Morning Edition.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Benjamin Crump, civil rights attorney. Crump gained national prominence by representing clients in some of the most important and contentious high-profile cases for African-Americans.

Crump talks about being an attorney, why he believes in fighting to preserve the advances in justice and equality that people of color achieved during the civil rights movement, and representing the families of African-Americans shot and killed by police.

NASA

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Dr. Mary Frances Berry, the Geraldine R. Segal Professor of American Social Thought, professor of history at the University of Pennsylvania, former chairwoman of the United States Commission on Civil Rights, and author of History Teaches Us to Resist: How Progressive Movements Have Succeeded in Challenging Times.  

Poet Mahogany L. Browne joined poet and novelist Carrie Fountain to talk about how she came to poetry, to share one of her favorite poems by Hiwot Adilow and to read her powerful poem "Black Girl Magic."

The StoryCorps mobile booth was in Austin in January, and we’re bringing you some of the stories that were recorded there. Locally recorded stories will air on Monday mornings during Morning Edition and archived here.

Sylvia Orozco is the director and co-founder of Austin’s Mexic-Arte Museum, and in the mid-1980s, she worked to bring Mexico’s traditional Dia de los Muertos celebration to a wider audience in Austin. While the StoryCorps mobile booth was in town, she sat down with her friend and colleague Rebecca E.C. Gomez to share that story.

From Austin Angels, this month's Get Involved spotlight organization:  

Every child deserves love and consistency. But too many don’t receive it — especially those in our foster care system. Austin Angels is out to change that.

The Best Songs Ever ... This Week, June 29, 2018

Jun 29, 2018
Austin Price for KUT

The staff at our sister station KUTX scour the earth to bring listeners the best music. Each Friday, they share three of their favorite songs on Morning Edition.

"This year's our sixtieth anniversary season, and that's terrific because we really get to celebrate all of the wonderful people and organizations and donors and volunteers that have all come together over the last sixty years to make us really Austin's favorite summer musical," says Zilker Theater Productions' artistic director, J. Robert Moore.

Poet Sam Sax talks with poet and novelist Carrie Fountain about poetry as biography, the history of medician, poetry as performance and  much more.

He also reads his poem "#Hypocondria" from his book Madness, and shares one of his favorite poems, "Katherine With The Lazy Eye. Short. And Not a Good Poet." by Francine J. Harris.


The StoryCorps mobile booth was in Austin in January, and we’re bringing you some of the stories that were recorded there. Locally recorded stories will air on Monday mornings during Morning Edition and archived here.

Karen Kelvie, age 58, recently sat down with her son Xan Bauer, who was just about to turn 21. They chatted about their life together, and about what they’ve learned from each other over the years.

The Best Songs Ever ... This Week, June 22, 2018

Jun 22, 2018
Julia Reihs / KUT

The staff at our sister station KUTX scour the earth to bring listeners the best music. Each Friday, they share three of their favorite songs on Morning Edition

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. concludes his conversation with Dr. Benjamin W. Nero, author of That’s The Way It Was: A Memoir. Dr. Nero was the first African-American to graduate from the University of Kentucky’s College of Dentistry, and the first African-American intern resident at the Albert Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia.

Errich Petersen

"Reina has this uncanny ability to mash together hard science and the most fantastical myths that you’ve ever heard of," says director Liz Fisher of Reina Hardy, the writer of the new play The Afterparty. "That seems like a really unlikely pairing, and yet through the sort of beautiful alchemy that only she can do, she creates these stories that are beautifully human and... universal in their themes -- these ideas of love, of loss, of moving on, of hope, with a whole lot of magic."

"[Poetry] is the only place that I can defy the world," Roger Reeves told poet Carrie Fountain and producer Rebecca McInroy for this edition of This Is Just To Say. Thinking of poetry as a place and a practice, rather than the attempt to create the "perfect poem" was just one of the many revelations in their conversation.

Reeves also generously debuted his poem "Children, Listen," now available at poets.org, and he shared one of his favorite poems "Preliminary Question" by Aimé Césaire, from his book Solar Throat Slashed.


The StoryCorps mobile booth was in Austin in January, and we’re bringing you some of the stories that were recorded there. Locally recorded stories will air on Monday mornings during Morning Edition and archived here.

Karen Collier and Monica Smith met in 1968, when Karen’s family moved and she enrolled in Butterfield Elementary, a small country school on Highway 277 outside of Abilene. She met Monica on her first day at school, and the two quickly began a friendship that is now fifty years old. The two sat down in the StoryCorps mobile booth this January, and shared some memories.

Austin's Nook Turner started the Jump On It Summer Music Festival way back in the '90s, when he was just a teenager. Twenty-one years later, the festival has grown larger and more ambitious than ever. The fest has always featured live music (including hip hop, jazz, and R&B) and an educational component, but this year they're expanding both of those efforts.

The Best Songs Ever ... This Week, June 15, 2018

Jun 15, 2018
Martin do Nascimento / KUT

The staff at our sister station KUTX scour the earth to bring listeners the best music. Each Friday, they share three of their favorite songs on Morning Edition.  

Belle and Sebastian

A local soul outfit, a master of the resonator guitar and a Scottish indie pop band are among the live music acts you can catch in Austin this weekend. We get recommendations from Matt Reilly with our sister station KUTX 98.9


On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Dr. Benjamin Nero, author of That’s The Way It Was: A Memoir. Dr. Nero was the first African-American to graduate from the University of Kentucky’s College of Dentistry and the first African-American intern resident at the Albert Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia.

This weekend, Spectrum Theatre Company is presenting two staged readings of the new play Juneteenth Chronicles, by local playwright Abena Edwards. The play is drawn from the actual words of former slaves, who were interviewed in 1937 by the Federal Works Project Administration. Transcripts of those interviews now reside in the Library of Congress.

The StoryCorps mobile booth was in Austin in January, and we’re bringing you some of the stories that were recorded there. Locally recorded stories will air on Monday mornings during Morning Edition and archived here.

Ernestine Balderrama Kubicek earned her Masters and Ph.D. from the University of Texas, had a long career in corporate America, and now runs her own consulting firm. But before all that, she was born in Brownwood, Texas, to a contractor father and homemaker/bookkeeper mother. She sat down in the StoryCorps mobile booth with her son, Christopher Morse, and shared some memories.

Pages