media

From Texas Standard.

When Jessica McClure, an 18-month-old girl in Midland, was stuck in a well for 58 hours in October of 1987, CNN carried most of the rescue effort live. There was an international sigh of relief when a crew of roughnecks and first responders finally brought Baby Jessica to the surface.

Aidan Wakely-Mulroney/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard.

Headlines of the past few days have heralded the potential consequences of the impending decision by a federal district judge on whether Texas-based AT&T can merge with Time Warner. Business writers say the decision will determine whether old-line media companies will have the tools to compete with tech and entertainment companies in the future, or whether those media companies will lose out, as tech giants and makers of entertainment go around the older firms to sell to viewers. And entertainment consumers will be affected too, if fewer companies consolidate to control both the means of accessing content, and the content itself.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

What kind of job did the media do covering the Austin serial bombings earlier this year? That depends on which media you are talking about.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT News

From Texas Standard:

As local newspapers continue to die out, the communities they used to serve have come to be known as “news deserts.” But the changing media landscape doesn't only affect the communities where they were. One unintended consequence of news deserts is their impact on disease research.

Dr. David Scales of Harvard Medical School says as local news outlets die information on the spread of infectious diseases becomes harder to come by.

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