Steve Adler

Martin do Nascimento for KUT

Austin Mayor Steve Adler wants the city to scrap CodeNEXT and start over. 

In a post to the Austin City Council message board Wednesday, Adler asked that the city manager come up with a new process for updating the city’s 34-year-old land-use code. The mayor bemoaned “misinformation” surrounding the yearslong discussion.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Austin has endured several legal jabs from the state in the past couple months.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

The Austin City Council will have the chance next month to tweak the specifics of a $925 million bond package it approved last month for the Nov. 6 ballot. But the vote was not unanimous, as some council members expressed concern about the accompanying property tax hike.

Andrea Garcia for KUT

The investigation continues into the serial bombings this month that killed two people and seriously injured four others in Austin. The bomber, Mark Conditt, detonated a bomb and killed himself as police were closing in on him in Round Rock on Wednesday. 

KUT's Jennifer Stayton talks with Austin Mayor Steve Adler about the issues the case has raised and how the city can move forward.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Has a foreign government infiltrated the CodeNEXT process?

Well, no one’s saying that. But in his annual State of the City address on Tuesday, Austin Mayor Steve Adler said the "alleged Russian infiltration" on our nation’s politics has inflamed divisions across the country – and highlighted rifts at the local level, as well.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Austin Mayor Steve Adler will give his 2018 State of the City address Tuesday evening. We’re not sure what he’ll say, but read through Adler’s three previous speeches and you’ll find more than one theme or phrase repeated.

So, to help you follow along – and to add some excitement to what is usually a dry event – we’ve created several State of the City BINGO (though, we replaced B-I-N-G-O with A-D-L-E-R – because, duh) cards. Print them out or play online (click to highlight a square). You can also turn it into a drinking game, although KUT would never promote alcohol consumption.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Austin’s Equity Office is considering how to make good on a report published last April that laid out more than 200 recommendations for how the city can combat institutional racism.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Austin is on the short list of cities Amazon might choose to host its second headquarters. But just what would bringing the huge ecommerce company do for Austin?

In a letter to Amazon last year, Mayor Steve Adler called it an “opportunity for a precedent-setting partnership.”

KUT's Jennifer Stayton sat down with Adler to talk about the potential he sees if Amazon were to pick Austin.

Campaign finance reports reveal that Austin Mayor Steve Adler is the only member of the City Council who has begun seriously fundraising for re-election.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

Austin Mayor Steve Adler has his first official challenger in the race for mayor in November.

Former Austin City Council Member Laura Morrison announced in an email Monday that she will run against Adler for the city’s top elected position.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Hundreds gathered outside Austin City Hall on Saturday to rally against white supremacy and hear from activists and elected leaders. Demonstrators wrapped around the exterior of City Hall and helped themselves to free water bottles from coolers to combat the triple-digit heat.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez

After Austin Mayor Steve Adler’s response to a sexist email his office received went viral, he began fielding calls to run for president. As someone who has covered the mayor for most of his time in office, I was struck by how different the tone of the response was from his in-person demeanor, which is more subdued, measured and diplomatic.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Texas is preemptively suing the City of Austin, Travis County and the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund to enforce the state’s newly minted “sanctuary city” law, Senate Bill 4.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Austin Mayor Steve Adler and other mayors are headed to Washington, D.C., to seek clarity on what a "sanctuary city" is during a meeting Tuesday with Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

Adler said in a blog post on Medium that, with so much on the line, including federal funding, "mayors need to know what is meant by a term being used by a lot of people to mean many different things."

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

In November, Austin Mayor Steve Adler announced the formation of a group of local leaders tasked with suggesting city policy that could begin to ensure equity throughout the city. On Tuesday, the Mayor’s Task Force on Institutional Racism and Systemic Inequities published its nearly 70-page final report.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT News

From Texas Standard:

On Monday, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions criticized so-called "sanctuary cities" and threatened cuts in federal funding if local governments do not cooperate with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) requests to detain people in their jails who may be undocumented. In Austin, both the city and county government have resisted some federal hold requests, and Mayor Steve Adler says he’s looking for clarification as to the federal government’s intentions.

Bob Daemmerich / Texas Tribune

Austin Mayor Steve Adler is set to meet Wednesday with U.S. Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly as the debate over "sanctuary cities" continues to ripple across Texas. 

Adler said Sunday he will attend the meeting in Washington as part of a group of mayors from the U.S. Conference of Mayors as well as police chiefs associated with some of the cities.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Attend the Mayor Steve Adler's annual State of the City address with a group of 20- and 30-somethings and you’re likely to catch at least one reference to NBC’s comedy “Parks and Recreation.” In the show, comedian Amy Poehler plays the excitable head of a small city’s parks and recreation department. As Amy Stansbury, 26, knows, the image the show paints of local government is less than flattering.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT News

In his annual State of the City Address on Saturday, Austin Mayor Steve Adler appeared to denounce the White House’s ban on Syrian refugees and immigrants from some Muslim-majority countries.

“I just want the immigrant and refugee community in this city to know that we are a welcoming and supportive community and that they are an important part of our community and in this community they should feel welcome and safe,” he said.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

Just before the new year, Austin Mayor Steve Adler wrote a lengthy post on the city council message board, titled: “Possible solution to downtown puzzle.”

He later said it wasn't so much a puzzle, but that there were a lot of pieces involved. What he's referring to is a snaking spine of green space, commercial areas and academic space just west of I-35, in the easternmost part of downtown.

Ilana Panich-Linsman/KUT

Austin Mayor Steve Adler is laying out some of his priorities for the city council in the New Year.

In a post on the Council’s online message board Thursday, Adler laid out his vision around several items focused on downtown development and businesses.

He pointed to the area around Waller Creek in particular, calling for expanding a tax financing plan to pay for the development of parkland around the creek.

Ilana Panich-Linsman for KUT

From the Austin Monitor: The Combined Law Enforcement Associations of Texas, or CLEAT, has subpoenaed Mayor Steve Adler to give testimony at an upcoming arbitration hearing in the firing of Officer Geoffrey Freeman.

Freeman lost his job after shooting an unarmed, naked teenager in February when the teenager charged at him on his bicycle.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

President-elect Donald Trump told "60 Minutes" in an interview this weekend that he plans to immediately deport roughly two to three million undocumented immigrants upon taking office. That announcement is something many immigrants here in Austin have been fearing since election night.

On Sunday morning, hundreds of people gathered at City Hall to show support for the city’s immigrant community, where city lawmakers also pledged local support. 

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

Cars, buses and trucks idle at the four-way intersection at Guadalupe Street and West Dean Keeton Street. A horde of prospective students takes to the crosswalk, the timer counting down. 


Jeff Heimsath for KUT

From the Austin Monitor: As City Council members careen toward their first chat with the public over a potentially massive mobility bond, a new proposal for light rail investment has risen up from the grassroots.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez for KUT News

There have been plenty of critics of the work the Austin City Council’s done over the past year. Tuesday night, Austin Mayor Steve Adler delivered his second State of the City Address – offering a defense of their work.

The Mayor was cautious in summing up the past year’s achievements.


Ilana Panich-Linsman for KUT News

Austin Mayor Steve Adler delivers his State of the City address Tuesday evening. Titled “Great Cities Do Big Things,” it’s the second annual address of Adler’s term as mayor. He delivered his first in April of 2015, after the city's new 10-1 council had been active for about 100 days.

Tuesday night's State of the City starts at 7:00 at the Zach Theatre on South Lamar. You can watch a live stream at the city's website here.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. for KUT

Given that it’s in a government building, the painting that hangs outside Mayor Steve Adler’s office is a bizarre choice. It’s a portrait of a cat – its head crowned in what looks like a steel headdress, with an ornate keyhole at its center. Behind the cat’s head, canoes full of sushi float atop a body of water. Chopsticks stand in for paddles. If nothing else is clear – and little is – the cat wields enormous power over these pieces of sushi. The canoes carrying them appear to be rowing toward it in an act of obedience.


Lyft via youtube

From the Austin Monitor: Mayor Steve Adler on Sunday revealed that he has been working with a representative of Lyft, one of the transportation network companies that has been backing an initiative on the May 7 ballot to prevent the city from enforcing mandatory fingerprinting for TNC drivers. Adler said he has been discussing with attorney Michael Whellan, who represents Lyft, the idea of entering into a Memorandum of Understanding with the TNCs.

Todd Wiseman/Texas Tribune

Austin Mayor Steve Adler plans to propose a new set of incentives to resolve the standoff over fingerprinting drivers for ride-hailing apps like Uber and Lyft.

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