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Top Morning Stories July 19, 2011

Sun_002.jpg
Photo by KUT News.
Texas border patrol agents are on alert for suspected illegal immigrants who may become overheated by the sun.

Border Patrol Helping Heat Distressed Immigrants

Border Patrol agents in South Texas have stepped up efforts to search for and rescue suspected illegal immigrants who may be under heat stress.  The Associated Press reports the Rio Grande Valley Border Patrol Sector has launched "Operation Heat Wave."  Agents are on alert for people in heat-related distress. So far this year the Sector has helped more than 120 people who were ill. 

 

Report Examines Texas School Disciplinary Measures

Texas researchers have released a comprehensive analysis of school suspension policies. The study takes a detailed look at disciplinary policies and says when these policies are misused, they often put students at greater risk of dropping out or going to jail or prison.

Breaking Schools' Rules, the title of the study, is extraordinary in that it looked at individual school records and tracked all seventh graders in Texas, 1 million of them, for six years. One finding surprised even veteran educators: 60 percent of all the students who were studied were suspended or expelled at least once between their 7th-and 12th-grade years.

NPR News' Claudio Sanchez gave an overview of the study during Morning Edition today. He looks at how minorities are affected and whether disciplinary policies in Texas schools are working. You can listen to that story here

UTPD Releases Report on Campus Shooting        

UT police have released a report reviewing their handling of last September’s shooting incident on campus. That’s when 19 year-old Colton Tooley fired shots on campus before committing suicide on the sixth floor of the Perry Castaneda Library. 

The report praised officers from various law enforcement agencies for responding quickly. But it did cite some communication problems. The report said not all responders immediately knew which radio frequency to use.  Also, some of the emergency terms used that day confused the public and meant different things to different agencies.