Audrey McGlinchy | KUT

City Hall Reporter

Credit Martin do Nascimento / KUT
Audrey McGlinchy is the City Hall reporter at KUT, covering the Austin City Council and the policies they discuss. She comes to Texas from Brooklyn, where she tried her hand at publishing, public relations and nannying. Audrey holds English and journalism degrees from Wesleyan University and the City University of New York. She got her start in journalism as an intern at KUT Radio during a summer break from graduate school. While completing her master's degree in New York City, she interned at the New York Times Magazine and Guernica Magazine.

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Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

A 42-year-old black and Hispanic man died from multiple gunshot wounds in a police shooting in April, according to a report the Austin Police Department filed Wednesday with the Texas Attorney General's Office. 

A notice to vacate is posted on an Austin home in 2018.
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

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La Corte Suprema de Texas ha dado luz verde para que la prohibición de procedimientos de desalojo expire el lunes 18 de mayo, lo que significa que a partir del martes ya no existe un impedimento estatal para que un propietario pueda desalojar a un inquilino.

A notice to vacate is posted on an Austin home in 2018.
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The Texas Supreme Court is letting its ban on eviction proceedings expire today, meaning that starting tomorrow there is no longer a state ban on a landlord’s ability to evict a tenant.

UT student Sean Saldana in his North Austin apartment
Michael Minasi / KUT

Sean Saldaña decided earlier this year that at 23 he was too old to be sharing an apartment with his dad. So, the UT Austin senior began hunting for a new place to live.

Julia Reihs / KUT

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La ciudad de Austin y la autoridad local de vivienda pública recibieron 10,738 solicitudes para una parte de los $1.2 millones que la ciudad reservó para ayudar a las personas afectadas por la pandemia del COVID-19 para pagar su alquiler. Pero sólo unas 1,000 familias recibirán esa ayuda.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

With a legal objection now withdrawn, the Austin Police Department says it will go ahead with its plan to release dashboard and body camera recordings of an officer shooting that ended in the death of a 42-year-old black and Hispanic man.

Austin Police Department cars
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

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La policía de Austin no halló un arma en o cerca del auto de Michael Ramos, el hombre negro  hispano que murió después de recibir disparos de la policía el mes pasado, dijo el lunes el jefe de la policía, Brian Manley.

Julia Reihs / KUT

The City of Austin and the local public housing authority received 10,738 applications for a slice of $1.2 million the city put aside to help people affected by the COVID-19 pandemic pay their rent. But only about 1,000 families will get help.

Austin Police Department cars
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Austin police did not find a gun in or near the car of Michael Ramos, the black and Hispanic man who died after being shot at by police last month, Police Chief Brian Manley said Monday.  

911 calls indicate West Oaks Rehabilitation and Health Care Center in Southwest Austin has had a cluster of COVID-19 cases.
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

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"Tengo un residente. Su temperatura está subiendo y su oxígeno está bajando bastante, por lo que el médico quiere sacarla[del hogar]", dice quien llamó desde el Riverside Nursing and Rehabilitation Center en una llamada al 911 el 21 de abril. "Ella es COVID-positiva. ... Tiene una temperatura de 102. Su nivel de oxígeno está bajando".

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The City of Austin has delayed by about a month the start of the next training academy for incoming police until it can finish an audit of materials used to teach new officers.

911 calls indicate West Oaks Rehabilitation and Health Care Center in Southwest Austin has had a cluster of COVID-19 cases.
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

"I have a resident. Her temperature is going up and her oxygen is dropping quite low, so the doctor wants to send her out," the caller from Riverside Nursing and Rehabilitation Center says in a 911 call April 21. "She’s COVID-positive. ... She’s running a temp of 102. Her oxygen level’s dropping."

Businesses in downtown Austin were boarded up during the coronavirus pandemic in April. Gov. Greg Abbott has allowed restaurants and certain other businesses to reopen at 25% capacity on Friday, but not all are choosing to do so.
Michael Minasi / KUT

Texas’ statewide stay-at-home order expires Friday, but the City of Austin has yet to clarify how this might affect local residents, how it will enforce the governor’s new order and what, if any, additional requirements the city will enact.

The McKinney Heights Park in South Austin is blocked off with caution tape.
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Austin City Council members voted earlier this month to distribute $15 million to various nonprofits as part of a relief package for people affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Money from the Relief in a State of Emergency (RISE) Fund is being sent out in waves: In April, the city distributed at least $5.6 million and more funds will go out next month.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The graphs UT Austin professor Lauren Ancel Meyers presented to Austin City Council members in a virtual meeting Tuesday were “plausible futures” and not “forecasts.”

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The Austin Justice Coalition, Grassroots Leadership and other advocacy groups are asking city leaders to fire Austin Police Chief Brian Manley, Chief of Staff Troy Gay and Assistant City Manager Ray Arellano.

Samantha White shows her journal
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Wake up. Eat breakfast. Don’t leave the house. Work from home. Think about what else is to come. Don’t leave the house. Hang out with friends over Zoom. Watch TV. Leave the house – but wear a mask. Worry. Feel grateful. Worry. Get sad. Don’t leave the house. Do it all again, with some slight variation, the next day.

Residents look at maps of Austin's proposed new land development code, at an information session in October.
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The City of Austin on Thursday appealed a Travis County judge’s order voiding votes taken in an ongoing process to adopt a new land development code.

Last month, Judge Jan Soifer of the 345th District Court ruled the city had violated state law when it failed to inform individual property owners of potential changes to their land under the proposed new land code. A code would determine what can be built in the city and where.

Former Assistant Police Chief Justin Newsom has been accused of racism, but an independent investigation could not corroborate the accusations.
Emree Weaver for KUT

An outside investigator hired by the City of Austin to look into allegations of racism and homophobia against two assistant police chiefs has largely been unable to corroborate the accusations.

A construction site in Ausin.
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Kara says she's been having regular panic attacks over the past couple weeks knowing her husband, a commercial plumber in Austin, is going to work.

St. David's South Austin Medical Center
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

A breakdown of hundreds of coronavirus cases in Austin-Travis County closely mirrors the current racial and ethnic demographics of the city.

A lone person crosses the street in the rain in Austin.
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Austin City Council members have approved a $15 million relief fund to aid residents affected financially by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Workers handle paperwork at a drive-thru coronavirus screening site at CommUNITYCare Clinic at the Hancock Center in Austin last month.
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

As Austin tries to track down those who’ve come in contact with the 502 people who have tested positive for the coronavirus, the interim health authority and public health medical director said it’s hard to draw a clear line between many of the cases.

UT freshman Andrew Dareing moves his belongings out of the Jester-West dorm after campus shut down to help prevent the spread of the coronavirus.
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Andrew Dareing is from Mertzon, Texas – a town with 743 people, where the only stoplight is a four-way blinking yellow light.

A for-rent sign in Austin
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

More than half of Austin residents are renters. At the beginning of each month, rent is due for tenants with cut hours, cut wages or no wages at all as the COVID-19 pandemic has forced workplaces to close.

Dr. Jaime Jones is an emergency medicine physician at a major Austin hospital.
Michael Minasi / KUT

Austin-Travis County has confirmed 200 cases of COVID-19 as of Sunday night. One person in the area, a woman in her 70s, has died from the illness. The city is far from the epicenter of the pandemic in the U.S.; places like New York City and New Orleans are reporting hospitals being overwhelmed.

But public health experts are warning that Austin could face similar problems unless residents limit their contact with others.

An eviction notice is posted on a home in Southwest Austin in 2018.
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Click here to read this story in English. 

Los inquilinos de Austin que hayan sido afectados por las consecuencias financieras del COVID-19 tienen 60 días para pagar la renta atrasada una vez que sus caseros comienzan a amenazarlos con desalojo. 

An eviction notice is posted on a home in Southwest Austin in 2018.
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Austin tenants affected financially by the COVID-19 pandemic have 60 days to come up with owed rent once a landlord starts threatening eviction.

Cherie Little and Steven Kresena stand outside their apartment in South Austin.
Michael Minasi / KUT

It’s a hell of a time to try and open a restaurant.

That’s what Steven Kresena was thinking last week as he watched Austin Mayor Steve Adler order all restaurants and bars to close to diners in an attempt to stall the spread of the coronavirus. Kresena had just inspected the tile in his new restaurant, Ovenbird, which was set to open on South Congress this month.

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