Audrey McGlinchy, KUT

City Hall Reporter

Credit Martin do Nascimento / KUT
Audrey McGlinchy is the City Hall reporter at KUT, covering the Austin City Council and the policies they discuss. She comes to Texas from Brooklyn, where she tried her hand at publishing, public relations and nannying. Audrey holds English and journalism degrees from Wesleyan University and the City University of New York. She got her start in journalism as an intern at KUT Radio during a summer break from graduate school. While completing her master's degree in New York City, she interned at the New York Times Magazine and Guernica Magazine.

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Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Bri Rodriguez buckled her son Rocky into his car seat. “Little grumps,” she said, teasing the 1-year-old as he scrunched up his face, unhappy at having to be in the car.

Nathan Bernier / KUT

The Austin Police Department released information to federal immigration officers 581 times in 2018 and asked one detained person about their immigration status, according to a report from Austin Police Chief Brian Manley.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Texas lawmakers on Thursday advanced a bill that would prevent a city from requiring private employers to give their workers certain benefits, such as paid sick leave.

The Jeremiah Program Moody Campus is a 35-unit affordable housing development in East Austin that houses single mothers.
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Some buildings in Austin reflect the city's zoning restrictions more than others.

Take the 35-unit affordable housing complex just south of East 12th Street. The building, which houses low-income single mothers and provides on-site child care, looks a bit like a tiered cake.

Hazel O'Neil for KUT

Nearly 30 people leaned against the railing on the second floor of a bar made out of shipyard containers. It was a warm Saturday night in September. Down the street, people sat on the front porch of Icenhauer’s, which pours grilled-pineapple-infused tequila.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The Austin Police Department agrees with most of the results of a state audit that found police wrongly classified a number of rape cases in 2017, according to a letter Police Chief Brian Manley sent the Texas Department of Public Safety on Monday.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The City of Austin will conduct an independent review of sexual assault investigations handled by the Austin Police Department. The Austin City Council voted unanimously Thursday to undertake the audit, which was spurred by community concerns over how the department classifies and investigates cases.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

If you’ve ever aspired to get your face on public access TV, this guide to testifying before council members at City Hall should make it pretty easy.

Martin do Nascimento / KUT

If you’ve ever attended an Austin City Council meeting, you know public testimony can sometimes drag on for hours.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Austin shouldn’t expect the housing market gains it has seen in the past couple of years.

That was the prevailing sentiment delivered by Eldon Rude, principal with 360 Real Estate Analytics, at the Homebuilders Association of Austin’s annual housing forecast today. Developers joined elected officials and local government staff to eat breakfast and hear about what to expect in 2019.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The Austin Police Department has ordered a third-party audit of sexual assault investigations after state auditors found it misclassified certain rape cases.  

F Delventhal/Flickr

Prak Property Management Inc. has been digging into savings to keep some of its low-income properties in Austin running.

“It’s like a savings account that every month we are required to put a certain amount of dollars into for things like roofs, appliances, that sort of thing,” said Brad Prak, a management agent with the Texas-based company.

KUT

When Austin Police Chief Brian Manley announced last week that state auditors had found problems with how police classify rape cases, some people were not shocked by the news.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Road deaths in Austin dropped slightly in the city’s second full year of a campaign for traffic safety.

Seventy-four people died on city streets in 2018, according to numbers from the Austin Police Department. That's two fewer deaths than the year before.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

State auditors have found that the Austin Police Department inaccurately classified more than two dozen rape cases from three months in 2017, according to Police Chief Brian Manley.

The results are preliminary. At a news conference Monday, Manley said a full report from the Texas Department of Public Safety would be released later this month.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

When the Texas Legislature reconvenes Jan. 8, lawmakers will already have on their desks bills aimed at undoing City of Austin rules.

The city-state conflict is nothing new. Last time they met in 2017, state lawmakers passed bills overturning Austin ordinances affecting ride-hailing companies, like Uber and Lyft, and passed a "sanctuary cities" bill.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The bureaucratic stars over City Hall may just align in 2019.

Next year, the city will weigh four ambitious plans that aim to achieve the long-sought goal of making Austin more affordable.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

People experiencing homelessness can now work for the City of Austin.

The city's Parks and Recreation Department, along with the Austin Public Health Department, The Other Ones Foundation and Austin City Council Member Ellen Troxclair highlighted the pilot program Monday in southeast Austin.

Celeste Noche for KUT

As Austin grows, it’s getting more difficult for middle-income people to afford the city. But Austin is not alone; cities across the country are facing similar issues. KUT’s Audrey McGlinchy traveled to Seattle, Denver and Portland to find out how each city is dealing with rapid growth – and how they're trying to make sure every resident benefits from it.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Austin’s paid sick leave ordinance is likely not going into effect any time soon – and may never.

A Texas court of appeals ruled Friday that the ordinance, which mandates that most private employees in Austin get six to eight paid sick days a year, violates the state constitution. Specifically, it found, the ordinance is preempted by the Texas Minimum Wage Act.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. for KUT

Officers with the Austin Police Department are getting a new labor contract.

After nearly a year of negotiations, City Council members unanimously approved a four-year and $44.6 million contract between the city and the local police union. Police reform activists celebrated the contract as a step toward more transparency – including the ability to file complaints online and anonymously.

Kirsten Leah Bitzer for KUT

Austin is growing and it’s getting more difficult for middle-income people to afford the city. But Austin is not alone; cities across the country are facing similar issues. KUT’s Audrey McGlinchy traveled to Seattle, Denver and Portland to find out how each city is dealing with rapid growth – and how each is trying to make sure every resident benefits from it.

Roving-Aye/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Austin is growing and it’s getting more difficult for middle-income people to afford the city. But Austin is not alone; cities across the country are facing similar issues. KUT’s Audrey McGlinchy traveled to Seattle, Portland and Denver to find out how each city is dealing with rapid growth – and how they're trying to make sure every resident benefits from it.

Gabriel C. Pérez

Most mornings, Dave Sullivan bikes from his house in Clarksville to the University of Texas. He then hops on an express bus to his job as a researcher at the J.J. Pickle Research Campus.

During the election season, his daily commute served as a sort of poll of voters – albeit, with a miniscule sample size.

Eddie Gaspar for KUT

Steve Adler won re-election as Austin mayor in a landslide victory Tuesday and will serve another four years in office as voters came out in record numbers in Travis County.

Adler earned 59 percent of the vote and overpowered his biggest challenger, former Austin City Council Member Laura Morrison, and five other candidates.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

It took two years and millions of dollars, but thousands of sexual assault evidence kits collected in Austin and stuck in backlog have finally been tested.

The Austin Police Department confirmed it completed the testing in late September.

Julia Reihs / KUT

Take all the people who live in New York City. Multiply that by two, and you'll get the number of passengers who are expected to travel through Austin's airport this year: 16 million.

IndyAustin screengrab

One of Austin’s more prolific political action committees has apologized after releasing a video ad featuring Pepe the Frog, a cartoon frog used by anti-Semitic and alt-right groups.

Audrey McGlinchy / KUT

Update: Austin's boil-water notice has been lifted. Find out more here.

Original story:

Austin Water officials say the water utility is on track to end its boil-water notice by Sunday evening at the latest.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

A Californian who attempted a 2016 presidential run. A staffing and finance company with offices in Austin, Dallas, Houston, Seattle and Denver. Men in California and New Jersey. These are some of the funders of political action committees behind two local ballot initiatives – Propositions J and K.

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