Audrey McGlinchy | KUT

City Hall Reporter

Credit Martin do Nascimento / KUT
Audrey McGlinchy is the City Hall reporter at KUT, covering the Austin City Council and the policies they discuss. She comes to Texas from Brooklyn, where she tried her hand at publishing, public relations and nannying. Audrey holds English and journalism degrees from Wesleyan University and the City University of New York. She got her start in journalism as an intern at KUT Radio during a summer break from graduate school. While completing her master's degree in New York City, she interned at the New York Times Magazine and Guernica Magazine.

Ways to Connect

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Eureka Holdings, the Dallas-based company that has remained mum about plans for the more than two-dozen properties it has purchased on East 12th Street, has unveiled some initial goals for the area.

The plans offered by Austin-based consulting firm Lionheart, give a conceptual look at what could come to the historically black, bustling commercial street in East Austin, but offered few specifics.

Tristan Ipock for KUTX

A collection of 26 music venues, theater spaces and art galleries are getting as much as $50,000 each in one-time funds from the City of Austin to cover rent and other property costs.

Housing in East Austin
Julia Reihs / KUT

The latest iteration of the city’s new land development code could allow builders to put up as many as 397,000 new housing units in Austin, according to a presentation city staff made to Council members Tuesday.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The City of Austin on Friday released another iteration of its land development code; these rules dictate what can be built in the city, how much can be built and where. The process has taken nearly eight years and cost more than $10 million.

Julia Reihs / KUT

The city has proposed allowing for denser housing while loosening parking requirements in its latest revamp of rules dictating what can be built in Austin and where. 

East Austin looking downtown at dusk
Julia Reihs / KUT

The City of Austin is unveiling a new version of its land development code Friday, the latest in an eight-year and more than $10 million process.

A land code determines what can be built and where it can go. Austin hasn’t rewritten its entire code since 1984.

Julia Reihs / KUT

The City of Austin’s new fiscal year starts Oct. 1, and with it comes new city fees. That can mean anything from what it costs to swim at Barton Springs Pool to the fees associated with construction permits.

An intersection on UT campus
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

The City of Austin is unlikely to reach its goal of zero traffic deaths or serious injuries by 2025, according to a new report from the city auditor.

Willie and Earlene Williams
Julia Reihs / KUT

One wall in Earlene and Willie Williams’ living room in Southeast Austin is covered almost entirely with family photos – something that’s easy to do when you have 11 kids, 14 grandkids and more than two dozen great-grandchildren.

“Matter of fact, I had so many pictures I couldn’t even put them up on the wall,” said Earlene, 73.

UT Austin students hold signs in support of sexual assault survivors.
Salvador Castro for KUT

The City of Austin will pay a Washington, D.C.-based research firm up to $800,000 to evaluate how Austin police officers investigate sexual assault cases. Last year, a string of reports revealed that the Austin Police Department had misclassified rape cases, raising questions about the integrity of these investigations.

Mose Buchele / KUT

A new report from a California-based market research firm finds that Austin ranks fifth in a list of cities facing the highest reconstruction costs due to potential wildfire damage.

Researchers with CoreLogic found that 53,984 Austin residents live within an area designated as having a high-to-extreme wildfire risk, representing the potential for roughly $16 billion in reconstruction costs.

Margaret Moore, the Travis County District Attorney, at a Travis County press briefing in 2017.
Martin do Nascimento / KUT

A lawsuit filed in federal court in Austin on Wednesday claims  Travis County District Attorney Margaret Moore and an employee in her office lied to the public about a sexual assault victim.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The Austin City Council approved a record $4.2 billion budget Tuesday, directing more money toward services for people who are homeless and to hire more police officers.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Bri Rodriguez buckled her son Rocky into his car seat. “Little grumps,” she said, teasing the 1-year-old as he scrunched up his face, unhappy at having to be in the car.

Nathan Bernier / KUT

The Austin Police Department released information to federal immigration officers 581 times in 2018 and asked one detained person about their immigration status, according to a report from Austin Police Chief Brian Manley.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Texas lawmakers on Thursday advanced a bill that would prevent a city from requiring private employers to give their workers certain benefits, such as paid sick leave.

The Jeremiah Program Moody Campus is a 35-unit affordable housing development in East Austin that houses single mothers.
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Some buildings in Austin reflect the city's zoning restrictions more than others.

Take the 35-unit affordable housing complex just south of East 12th Street. The building, which houses low-income single mothers and provides on-site child care, looks a bit like a tiered cake.

Hazel O'Neil for KUT

Nearly 30 people leaned against the railing on the second floor of a bar made out of shipyard containers. It was a warm Saturday night in September. Down the street, people sat on the front porch of Icenhauer’s, which pours grilled-pineapple-infused tequila.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The Austin Police Department agrees with most of the results of a state audit that found police wrongly classified a number of rape cases in 2017, according to a letter Police Chief Brian Manley sent the Texas Department of Public Safety on Monday.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The City of Austin will conduct an independent review of sexual assault investigations handled by the Austin Police Department. The Austin City Council voted unanimously Thursday to undertake the audit, which was spurred by community concerns over how the department classifies and investigates cases.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

If you’ve ever aspired to get your face on public access TV, this guide to testifying before council members at City Hall should make it pretty easy.

Martin do Nascimento / KUT

If you’ve ever attended an Austin City Council meeting, you know public testimony can sometimes drag on for hours.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Austin shouldn’t expect the housing market gains it has seen in the past couple of years.

That was the prevailing sentiment delivered by Eldon Rude, principal with 360 Real Estate Analytics, at the Homebuilders Association of Austin’s annual housing forecast today. Developers joined elected officials and local government staff to eat breakfast and hear about what to expect in 2019.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The Austin Police Department has ordered a third-party audit of sexual assault investigations after state auditors found it misclassified certain rape cases.  

F Delventhal/Flickr

Prak Property Management Inc. has been digging into savings to keep some of its low-income properties in Austin running.

“It’s like a savings account that every month we are required to put a certain amount of dollars into for things like roofs, appliances, that sort of thing,” said Brad Prak, a management agent with the Texas-based company.

KUT

When Austin Police Chief Brian Manley announced last week that state auditors had found problems with how police classify rape cases, some people were not shocked by the news.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Road deaths in Austin dropped slightly in the city’s second full year of a campaign for traffic safety.

Seventy-four people died on city streets in 2018, according to numbers from the Austin Police Department. That's two fewer deaths than the year before.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

State auditors have found that the Austin Police Department inaccurately classified more than two dozen rape cases from three months in 2017, according to Police Chief Brian Manley.

The results are preliminary. At a news conference Monday, Manley said a full report from the Texas Department of Public Safety would be released later this month.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

When the Texas Legislature reconvenes Jan. 8, lawmakers will already have on their desks bills aimed at undoing City of Austin rules.

The city-state conflict is nothing new. Last time they met in 2017, state lawmakers passed bills overturning Austin ordinances affecting ride-hailing companies, like Uber and Lyft, and passed a "sanctuary cities" bill.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The bureaucratic stars over City Hall may just align in 2019.

Next year, the city will weigh four ambitious plans that aim to achieve the long-sought goal of making Austin more affordable.

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