Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

The four Americans who were part of a prisoner exchange between the U.S. and Iran have been released by Iran, a senior administration official confirms, and those who wished to depart the country have left.

A fifth American was released separately from the exchange.

The release of the prisoners was the result of "tireless" work by American diplomats, on the sidelines of nuclear negotiations with Iran, President Obama said Sunday.

"I've met with some of the families. I've seen their anguish — how they ached for their husbands and sons," Obama said.

SAUL LOEB/POOL GETTY IMAGES via NPR

In a prime-time speech from the Oval Office Sunday night, Obama said that the United States would defeat the threat of terrorism — without compromising American values.

Obama began his third Oval Office address by remembering the 14 Americans who died in Wednesday's attack in San Bernardino, California.

One year after President Obama announced new executive actions on immigration, his administration is asking the Supreme Court to weigh in on the new policies.

The executive actions in question — the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents, or DAPA, as well as an expansion of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program, or DACA — would have affected millions of immigrants.

Jordan Spieth, 21, has won the Masters with a record-tying score, 18 under par.

Spieth led from the first round of the tournament in Augusta, Ga. — a feat last achieved by Raymond Floyd in 1976.

On Sunday, reports the AP, no other contender truly threatened Spieth's dominance:

No one got closer than three shots of the lead all day. Spieth shot a 2-under 70 to hold off Justin Rose and Phil Mickelson.

Rose, the 2013 U.S. Open champion playing in the final group of the major for the first time, and Mickelson were four shots back.

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