Jimmy Maas, KUT

Host and Reporter

I grew up in Austin and studied journalism at the University of Texas.  I began my radio career making fun of headlines on Austin sports and news-talk shows. I moved to New York City to be a comic. Found some pretty good "day jobs” managing a daily news radio show for the Wall Street Journal and later, producing business news for Bloomberg Television.  Now I bring you sports, business and oddball stories from around town, host afternoons and help with special projects. 

Ways to Connect

Today is October 21, 2015, a day fans of the 1980s Back To the Future movie franchise have been waiting for all year: the day Marty McFly stumbles upon his older self, and discovers hoverboards, after traveling 30 years in the future in a flux capacitor-enabled DMC-12.

As it turns out, the company behind that time-traveling car has roots right here in Texas, thanks to a recent legal settlement. 


Ilana Panich-Linsman/KUT

The second weekend of the Austin City Limits Festival is upon us.

If you don’t go to ACL, you may just view the two-weekend music event as a headache that consumes a lot city attention and resources. But, the thousands of visitors it brings to the city pump millions of dollars into the Austin economy – $194 million last year, according to C3 Presents. 

Tom Pennington/Getty Images

In football, there are positions, like quarterback, that get you a lot of attention. They get the glory, the endorsements, and the scrutiny when things go wrong. Take, for example, the heap of blame Russell Wilson took for that last-minute interception in the Super Bowl.

However, one of the most anonymous positions in football, if not in all of sport, is the long snapper. But an ex-Longhorn who's battled the odds throughout his career in football — from learning to long snap on YouTube to joining the Special Forces to becoming a walk-on at UT — is raising the profile of the position in his quest to become the NFL's oldest rookie.

Television icon Regis Philbin and comedy legend Don Rickles have been performing live shows together for a while now. Philbin, who's been half of more than one famous entertainment team, working with people like Joey Bishop and Kelly Ripa, says that Rickles tops his list of favorite co-performers.

"First of all, he's the funniest guy of all the comedians that Hollywood ever had," says Philbin, who was working as an entertainment reporter in Los Angeles when he met Rickles.

Minnesota Public Radio/flickr

For fifty years, Fred Willard has been entertaining America. He is one of the more prolific working actors of our time. He’ll be in town tonight for a taping of the public radio show, “Wits.” Spanning genres from ground-breaking comedies to tween sitcoms to animation voice work, he has more than 275 film and TV credits as an actor and more than 130 appearing as himself. Willard could be the embodiment of the improv comedy "Yes, and..." credo.

Minnesota Public Radio/flickr

Wits, the live public radio show that brings comedians, actors and musicians to the stage, is coming to Austin's Paramount Theater this week.

Host John Moe has managed to combine two of his interests – acting on stage and creating public radio — into what has become a pretty good gig. He talked with KUT’s Jimmy Maas this week about how it all began while he was still the host of “Marketplace Tech” based in Minneapolis.

Brian Khorey/AP

Update 4:45 p.m. Governor Greg Abbott today declared a state of disaster in Bosque, Clay, Denton, Eastland, Gaines, Montague and Van Zandt counties, authorizing further mobilization of state resources to assist affected communities. Additional counties may be added to the declaration as the situation develops.

Current state forecasts indicate the continuation of possible severe thunderstorms, large hail, damaging winds, flash flooding, river flooding and tornadoes across the state throughout the week. 

Sarah Jasmine Montgomery/KUT

This week, it finally ends for the handful of shops still operating in what’s left of Highland Mall. The mall closes to the public for good Thursday after years of decline. Austin Community College will soon take over the rest of the site.

Walking around the giant, mostly empty space, with Captain and Tennille playing in the background, you might think this is a relic of conspicuous consumption’s past.

But this isn’t about what Highland Mall is now. This story is about what it used to be.

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