Nadia Hamdan, KUT

Credit Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Nadia Hamdan is a reporter, producer and host at Austin's NPR station, KUT 90.5.

Her reporting has been heard on NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Here & Now and the BBC World Service, among others.

Nadia received her bachelor's in International Relations & Global Studies at the University of Texas at Austin.

She once conducted an entire interview while riding a mule through downtown Austin.

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Moyo Oyelola

Government leaders in Texas often tout the state as the best in the country for business, and they have some data to back that up. Texas is home to some of the fastest-growing cities in the U.S. But a new documentary debuting this week at South by Southwest asks viewers to look at the human cost of that growth.

Larry D. Moore CC BY-SA 3.0

Updated 6:10 p.m., March 5 

Lawyers for a woman who says she was sexually assaulted in Austin are asking a court to force Travis County prosecutors to answer questions and provide evidence after learning of a prosecutor’s phone call that they say defames the woman.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Austin likes to think of itself as a progressive city. For many, the liberal label is a point of pride, but for others, it doesn't ring true.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

A new group that aims to improve the response to sexual assaults in Austin and Travis County was announced yesterday. Its formation comes after public concern over how investigations have been handled. But that concern isn't new: There has been a group in place for nearly three decades tackling these issues, and the work hasn't been easy. 

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Travis County Judge Sarah Eckhardt and former state Sen. Wendy Davis announced the creation of a Sexual Assault Prevention and Healing Work Group today in response to concerns about how sexual assaults are handled in Travis County.

The group will focus on collecting data about sexual assaults to better advocate for survivors.

Gabriel C. Pérez

City Council Member Alison Alter posted a resolution today that would direct the city manager to find a third-party investigator to look at how sexual assault cases are handled in Austin.

Courtesy of Anne Helen Petersen

Think about your to-do list.

Now, think about how many things on that list have rolled over from last week ­­­– or maybe even last month. It could be something as easy as dropping off a package at the post office, but for some reason it just sits there on that ever-growing list of errands, haunting you.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

It’s a beautiful Sunday morning in Austin and I’m struggling with a recorder in one hand and a mic in the other. The rest of me is riding a mule. That’s right: a mule.

The scene gets weirder. The man riding another mule next to me is dressed as Santa Claus. His name is Sam Grey Horse.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Shareholders of Round Rock-based Dell Technologies voted Tuesday to take the company public after operating for five years as a private company. The closing of the roughly $23 billion move will happen at the end of the month.

Julia Reihs / KUT

UT Austin’s two university unions are set to offer free tampons and pads for students who may struggle to afford them.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Austin led Texas in the number of hate crimes reported last year, according to FBI data. The FBI’s 2017 hate crime statistics data show the state capital had 18 total incidents, marking the third year in a row the city saw hate crimes in the double digits.

Nathan Bernier / KUT

The City of Austin and the Austin police union have reached a tentative agreement for a new labor contract.

The agreement reached last night would give officers a pay raise and allow the city to expand its efforts on civilian-led police oversight. During negotiations Thursday, Austin Police Association attorney Ron DeLord expressed frustration with the process, calling it “theater.”

Nadia Hamdan / KUT

Ever since Austin issued an order to boil water, many residents have wondered how long it'll be before the city has clean drinking water. That's a question the Gazelle Foundation has been asking for years – just not about Austin.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The ride-hailing company Uber launched its new JUMP e-scooters in Austin today.

Uber's JUMP e-bikes have been in Austin since the summer, but now the company is getting in on the city’s growing scooter culture. Uber plans to initially drop a few hundred of the scooters across the city. They can be found and reserved through the Uber app.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon

An overnight spike in silt in Austin's tap water triggered an official boil-water notice from state regulators.

The water briefly exceeded the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality’s regulatory standards for drinking water quality, surpassing a limit of 5 turbidity units. The city's earlier boil-water notice was only precautionary.

Andrea Garcia for KUT

The UT Austin program aimed at expanding masculinity is back from a five-month hiatus after conservative media outlets accused it of treating masculinity as a mental health issue.

In 2015, the MasculinUT program was created within UT’s Counseling and Mental Health Center. Its goal was to engage the community in challenging stereotypes surrounding masculinity, with a goal of reducing interpersonal violence and sexual assault.

Twitter via @TravisCOSW

The Lower Colorado River Authority is advising residents along Lake Travis to be wary of rising water as levels at Lake Travis are forecast to reach near-record highs.

Jason Hlavenka/Flickr

An advisory committee is expected to recommend today that the Texas State Board of Education remove the word "heroic" from social studies curriculum when referring to defenders of the Alamo.

Courtesy of SKAM Austin

SKAM Austin is a typical teen drama in a lot of ways. There are hookups, breakups, cattiness and plenty of awkwardness. But, while the drama itself may walk a well-tread path, the path the show takes to reach its viewers is anything but. 

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

President Trump’s decision to roll back Obama-era guidelines supporting race-based college admissions could mean another legal challenge for UT Austin.

Since the university began factoring race and ethnicity into its admissions in 2003, UT says it has increased student body diversity.  But it has also been embroiled in a continual court battle over the legality of affirmative action – a battle that could end if Brett Kavanaugh fills the soon-to-be-vacant seat on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT News

Round Rock-based Dell Technologies is going public again after operating for five years as a private company. The $21.7 billion deal, announced Monday, was approved by the boards of Dell and VMware on Sunday night. VMware is the networking software company Dell acquired when it bought EMC.

Julia Reihs / KUT

Capital Metro recently ended a pilot program that would improve the way blind people use the bus system. It involves an app that uses voiceover technology to give people real-time transportation information while guiding them step-by-step to the nearest bus stop.

Montinique Monroe for KUT

Homeowners in a Del Valle suburb learned last month that their insurance rates could go up as much as $1,000 this year because they're too far from the nearest fire station.

Concerns about the rising rates has jumpstarted a push to get fire stations built across the city. The Austin City Council voted in 2016 to build five new stations in underserved neighborhoods, but little has been done since then to fulfill that promise.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Young women molested by Larry Nassar, the disgraced former USA Gymnastics team doctor, called on Texas to pursue criminal and civil charges against the owners of the Karolyi Ranch, a Huntsville facility that hosted the women's national team for decades.

Andrea Garcia for KUT

A UT Austin program aimed at expanding ideas of masculinity has been put on hold after conservative media outlets accused it of treating masculinity as a mental health issue.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

At 3 percent, the unemployment rate in Central Texas is one of the lowest in the country. But most of the jobs driving that low rate require higher skilled workers, and roughly two-thirds of job seekers here don't fall into that category.

Julia Reihs / KUT

You can't not notice the trees that line the paths on Austin's many hike and bike trails. But have you ever noticed a fair amount of them are numbered? They're on small metal tags nailed to the trunks.

Writer Will Neely noticed them while he was running along the Butler Hike and Bike Trail, so he asked about it for our ATXplained project, a series where KUT answers questions about life in Austin.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The University of Texas released a study last year that detailed how prevalent sexual assault and misconduct was on campus. UT President Greg Fenves called the report “a wake-up call” and promised to make improvements.

A year later, the school is focusing more on helping students navigate the process. 

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

An oxygen-deprived “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico would take decades to reverse, according to a study from the University of Waterloo in Canada.

Montinique Monroe for KUT

Roughly 10,000 people marched from Austin’s City Hall to the steps of the Texas State Capitol on Saturday, rallying in response to a student-led movement demanding stricter gun laws. It was one of more than 800 “March for Our Lives” protests happening across the country. 

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