Nathan Bernier

Host, All Things Considered

Nathan Bernier a KUT reporter and the local host during All Things Considered and Marketplace. He grew up in the small mountain town of Nelson, BC, Canada, and worked at commercial news radio stations in Ottawa, Montreal and Boston before starting at KUT in 2008. 

Nathan has won numerous journalism awards including a National Edward R. Murrow Award, Texas Associated Press Awards, Lonestar Awards from the Houston Press Club, and various other awards and recognitions.  

Ways to Connect

Favor

The Austin-based delivery company Favor has doubled its service zone, and it now covers an area stretching from Cedar Park to Slaughter Lane. The app-based service delivers everything from tacos to dry cleaning for a flat $5 fee, plus driver tip, and boasts an average 35-minute arrival time.

Favor has grown to serve more affluent and suburban areas, but the tech firm still provides relatively limited service in the less wealthy, minority neighborhoods of East Austin, Southeast Austin and Northeast Austin. Much of its delivery zone east of I-35 serves the most rapidly gentrifying neighborhoods.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr./KUT News

Homeless advocates in Austin got a $1.1 million infusion from the federal government to advance a relatively new, market-based approach to getting people off the streets.

Texas Department of Transportation

I-35 was closed for about nine hours overnight at Slaughter Lane so the Texas Department of Transportation could begin tearing down an almost 60-year old overpass. TxDOT opened the highway ahead of schedule Saturday at 8 a.m.

A closure of I-35 is scheduled again from 11 p.m. Saturday night to 10 a.m. Sunday morning, weather permitting. Drivers will be directed off the road at the Slaughter lane exit and can pass the area via the frontage road.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT

Austin is trying to end homelessness among veterans. Homeless advocates say the city has already attained “functional zero” veteran homelessness, and they’re awaiting formal recognition from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

The term “functional zero” could be confusing, because Austin still has veterans living on the street. So what does it mean?


Austin is facing its first weekend in more than two years without Uber or Lyft. Both companies pulled out Monday to protest voter rejection of Proposition 1, which would have eliminated mandatory fingerprint-based background checks.

Opponents of Prop 1 responded to Uber and Lyft’s threat to leave by arguing that if there is money to be made on ride-hailing in Austin, other companies will replace them. The city’s taxis are not able to meet demand during peak hours and special events, according to one study, but anyone who’s tried to call a cab on a Saturday night prior to the arrival of Uber and Lyft could tell you that.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon for KUT News

Near the intersection of Red River and Cesar Chavez, a large construction project is underway. A $370 million luxury hotel is being built there, the Fairmont Austin. A year ago, this construction site was a parking lot, rented out as a venue during South by Southwest. 


TexasMonthly.com

The people behind a forthcoming brewery in North Austin called the Flemish Fox broke ground on the project today. The brewery's founder is the daughter of the late Pierre Celis, who has made his mark on brewing in Austin and in the Belgian city of Hoegaarden.

KUT's Nathan Bernier learns more from Texas Monthly drinks columnist Jessica Dupuy


KUT

City of Austin officials are trying to keep events during South by Southwest near the same level of activity as 2015. More amplified sound permits were issued this year, but overall, the city has maintained the dialed-back approach it adopted after 2014 – the year Rashad Owens crashed his car through a crowd of people on Red River Street, killing four. 

Image via NASA (Public Domain)

From Texas Standard:

Today in 1986, the Challenger space shuttle broke apart over the coast of Cape Canaveral, Florida. Just 73 seconds after the shuttle's lift-off, its seven crew members were dead.

Charlotte Carpenter for KUT News

A group of parents, teachers and people who live around Robert E. Lee Elementary school are sending a formal message to the Austin school board: rename the school after someone who was not a prominent member of the Confederate States of America.


Todd Wiseman/Texas Tribune

Texas broke the seal on marijuana legalization this year when lawmakers voted to make available a non-intoxicating marijuana extract for patients with severe epilepsy in 2017. And, a national advocacy group for the legal marijuana industry is pledging to push even harder in Texas for a change in pot regulation.


Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

A member of the Austin City Council says he wants to prevent Syrian refugees from coming to Austin, which is putting him at odds with the mayor.

Do512 https://flic.kr/p/pJ6kUT

Fun Fun Fun Fest takes over Austin, plus shows by Igor and the Red Elvises, Robert Cray, Nic Armstrong and more this weekend. KUT's Nathan Bernier asks KUTX program director Matt Reilly for his live music selections. 


Nathan Bernier, KUT News

Wednesday 9:08 a.m. The FAA has reopened the top level of its permanent air traffic control tower at Austin-Bergstrom International Airport. This allowed airport officials to open the second runway. The radar at the base of the tower still isn't working. You should still check with your airline before heading to the airport. 

EarlierAustin-Bergstrom International Airport will be down to one runway likely until the end of the week, and even then, it could take a while longer before flight schedules return to normal.

ABIA's air traffic control tower flooded last week after almost 15 inches of rain fell on the airport. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) officials cut electricity to the tower to evaluate the damage and clean-up. 


David Burke https://flic.kr/p/i3erK7

It's Halloween weekend! Which live music performances should you show up to in costume? KUT's Nathan Bernier asks KUTX program director Matt Reilly. 


Laura Skelding, Austin American-Statesman

Austin has more Italian options than ever. KUT's Nathan Bernier asks Austin American-Statesman restaurant critic Matthew Odam about his review of a relatively new addition, Juliet Ristorante. 


Rodolfo Gonzales, Austin American-Statesman

Austin's restaurant scene continues to boom along with the city's economy, but who has time to keep track of the constant openings and closings?

At least one man does. Austin American-Statesman restaurant critic Matthew Odam is out with his annual dining guide. KUT's Nathan Bernier asks him about it. 

 

Check out the guide here

Hole in the Wall Could Close, or Not

Sep 11, 2015
Ben Philpott/KUT News

Hole in the Wall, a 41-year-old bar and music venue on The Drag that’s provided a stage for local performers for decades, may be the next venue in Austin to shut its doors forever, according to the Hole in the Wall’s manager Will Tanner.

Gage Skidmore https://flic.kr/p/e38G55

Did everyone pray in U.S. public schools prior to 1962 and was the Bible the principle textbook? Yes, according to Sen. Ted Cruz's father, Rafael Cruz, in an interview with the Austin American-Statesman. KUT's Nathan Bernier asks PolitiFact Texas reporter Gardner Selby what the Truth-O-Meter says

Photo by Rodolfo Gonzalez, Austin American-Statesman

A new European restaurant in the downtown Austin brings an open-kitchen dining experience to the space formerly occupied by Garrido's. Is it worth the price of admission? We asked Austin-American Statesman restaurant critic Matthew Odam about his review of Prelog's


Mary Kang/KUTX

In Austin’s Red River Cultural District, the 9-year-old venue Red 7 is closing at the end of September. The venue’s management could not come to terms with the owner on a new lease.

The venue and bar space at 611 E. 7th St. is listed at $14,000 a month, and the current managers were paying "around $10,000," Red 7 partner and Transmission Events co-owner Graham Williams says. 

"That's the nature of the beast," Williams says. "I was born and raised here. I've seen a hundred clubs open and close. Some of my favorite places to see bands when I was younger are no longer here, yet there's a bigger music scene than there ever was."

Ralph Arveson https://flic.kr/p/r1VdfC

Hear some of the artists in Austin this weekend as we ask KUTX program director Matt Reilly about some of the shows on his radar. 

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

The plaintiff at the heart of last week's historic Supreme Court ruling legalizing same-sex marriage is trekking the country on a multi-state tour that brought him to Austin today. Jim Obergefell is the named plaintiff in Obergefell v. Hodges.

Bill Oriani https://flic.kr/p/gxvmP5

Rising rents in Austin's Red River Cultural District are prompting the closure of Holy Mountain, a music venue that opened in 2012 at 617 East 7th Street. Holy Mountain's last show will be September 27.

The venue's operating group took over a four-year lease from the former tenants, Beauty Bar. The lease expires at the end of September, and general manager James Taylor says the landlord wants to raise the rent from $5,500 a month to $8,000, not including taxes, insurance and maintenance. 

https://flic.kr/p/eDkTDS

The Republic of Texas biker rally brings rock legends Lynyrd Skynyrd to town, along with members of Creedence Clearwater Revival. But there are also shows by Houston rap godfathers the Geto Boys and the San Antonio Smiths-influenced band Girl in a Coma.

 

KUT’s Nathan Bernier speaks to KUTX program director Matt Reilly about what’s happening on live music stages this weekend.


nasahqphoto/flickr

Neil deGrasse Tyson may be the biggest celebrity astrophysicist working today. In addition to hosting the reboot of the TV series “Cosmos,” he is also active on Twitter, where he makes science jokes, ruminates on the universe, and offers up physics-related facts. Now, Tyson is taking his ideas on the road. He'll be appearing across Texas this month, and today, he spoke with Nathan Bernier about the upcoming tour.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

The lakes that supply Austin with water - Travis and Buchanan - have risen dramatically over the past few days, but city of Austin officials are not ready to lift water restrictions just yet.

Before this most recent round of rains, the lakes were 39 percent full, combined. Now, they're 55 percent full

The Lower Colorado River Authority's vice president for water, John Hoffman, says they're happy the reservoirs are rising, but they still see it as a glass half empty. 

johanl/flickr

From Texas Standard:

Last year, music streaming services like Pandora and Spotify generated more revenue than CD sales. Musicians say they aren’t happy with how much they’re getting in return, especially now that streaming companies like Amazon, Google, and even NPR, have formed a lobbying group to try to lower the amount they pay to musicians. 

Perry-Castañeda Library Map Collection

Austin is becoming known for a lot more than just barbecue and Tex-Mex these days, but what were people in this city feasting on 125 years ago? The first cookbook published in Austin is helping to answer that question. 

The cookbook was compiled in 1891 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, which still exists. Mike Miller, director of the Austin History Center, dug it out of the archives and researched some of the people behind it for his new book, Austin’s First Cookbook: Our Home Recipes, Remedies and Rules of Thumb

"Cookbooks at that time, they weren't the recipes of everyday food," Miller says. "Most of the women who did that knew the recipes, and they were passed down orally from mother to daughter."

"These [recipes] are for special occasions," he says. Listen to our interview with Miller and read on to see some of the recipes. 

KMeron https://flic.kr/p/8LxTSz

We check in with KUTX program director Matt Reilly about some of the live shows on his radar, including performances by Of Montreal, Stevie Wonder and Stars.

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