Sangita Menon, KUT

Sangita Menon is a general assignment reporter for KUT. Before switching over to journalism in 2017, she was a circuit designer for a high-tech company in Austin. She has a degree in electrical engineering and computer science from UCLA. Sangita was born in India, grew up in California, lived in Oregon and finally made her way to Texas in 2007.  She lives in Austin with her husband and two daughters.

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Jessica Lo Surdo and Ross Marklein do stem sell research for the FDA
U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Austin is a “hot spot” for clinics marketing stem-cell treatments directly to consumers. In 2017, 100 of the 716 clinics in the U.S. that promoted the regenerative properties of stem cells to treat everything from dental problems to neurological diseases were in Texas. But there is limited research to prove the safety and efficacy of some of those treatments, and new research suggests there are unqualified people administering them.

Cockrell School of Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin

Researchers at UT Austin have designed a device that can measure both the electrical and mechanical pulses of the heart using a sensor so thin and stretchable they're calling it an "electronic tattoo."

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The Austin City Council voted unanimously Thursday to add 400 properties along Lake Austin onto the city’s tax rolls.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

People across the state will be able to fish in any public water body without a fishing license during the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department's 30th annual Free Fishing Day on Saturday.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

A bill before the Texas Senate would allow felons to seek public office only if they have received a pardon.

Current election code says a candidate who has been convicted of a felony must either be pardoned “or otherwise released from the resulting disabilities” – but it doesn’t define “resulting disabilities.” Senate Bill 466 would remove that clause.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

A dozen community activists assembled outside Andrews Elementary School in East Austin on Monday to demand the school district do more about Andrews' principal, who is accused of discriminating against immigrant parents.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

African-Americans are 20 percent more likely to experience serious mental health issues than the general population, according to Integral Care, which provides mental health care in Travis County.