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Politics

It's Election Day. Here’s what Central Texans need to know.

A person walks up some stairs with a "Vote" sign in the foreground.
Gabriel C. Pérez
/
KUT
A voter walks up to a polling site in Travis Heights neighborhood of Austin on Election Day.

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Today is Election Day in Texas. Eight state constitutional amendments are on the ballot, as well as a couple of city ballot measures, including a proposition to set mandatory police staffing levels in Austin.

Here’s what you need to know if you haven't voted yet.

Make sure you’re registered to vote

Go to this Texas Secretary of State website to check your registration status. The deadline to register to vote was Oct. 4.

Here’s what’s on the ballot

There are eight state constitutional amendments on the ballot. See what they're all about here. Austin residents also have two city-related propositions on their ballots. Proposition A mandates minimum staffing levels for the Austin Police Department. Prop B would allow the city to swap city-owned parkland for waterfront property.

In Williamson County, voters will weigh in on bonds for the Leander and Georgetown school districts.

Travis County voters can find out what their ballot will look like at VoteTravis.com. Scroll down to “Voter Lookup,” type in your information and hit “Look Me Up.” You’ll then see an option to “View My Ballot.”

Hays County voters can find their sample ballots here. Williamson County residents can find theirs here.

Here’s where and when you can vote

Polls open at 7 a.m. and close at 7 p.m. If you're in line to vote before 7 p.m., you can still vote after that time.

You can vote at any polling location within your county.

Don’t forget your ID

Make sure to bring a photo ID. The ID should be up to date or expired up to four years. Voters 70 or older can bring a photo ID that has been expired for any length of time.

If you had trouble getting an ID and can’t get one, here are some alternatives:

  • government document showing your name and an address, such as your voter registration certificate
  • current utility bill
  • bank statement
  • government check
  • paycheck
  • birth certificate

If you use one of these, you’ll have to sign a form that says you had a reasonable impediment to getting an ID.

Submitting a mail-in ballot?

It's too late to request an application for a mail-in ballot, but if you already have your mail-in ballot, you should mail it in or hand deliver it as soon as possible. If mailing, the ballot must be postmarked on or before Election Day and received no later than 5 p.m. the next day.

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