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Politics

2021 San Marcos election results: Gleason and Prather win races; most charter amendments pass

 San Marcos City Hall
Gabriel C. Pérez
/
KUT

Lee esta historia en español.

Voters in San Marcos reelected Mark Gleason to City Council and chose Jude Prather to join him in Tuesday's election. They also overwhelmingly approved amendments to the city's charter that set term limits for City Council members and the mayor.

Here are the election results.

City Council

Place 5: Mark Gleason

Incumbent Gleason picked up 54% of votes, while Zach Sambrano garnered about 46%. Gleason began his tenure on the City Council last December and had served on the planning and zoning commission before that.

Zambrano was born and raised in San Marcos and currently serves on the planning and zoning commission.

Place 6: Jude Prather

Prather won the vote by just 50.42% over Mark Rockeymoore. The race came down to a handful of votes. Prather is an officer for the Hays County Veteran Services Office and served on the City Council from 2010 to 2016.

Rockeymoore served on the City Council from 2018 to 2020.

City Charter Amendments

Proposition A: Approved by 76.82% of voters.

Proposition A would reorganize the "Statement of Goals" section in the city charter by the following categories: people, place, environment, economy and public services.

Proposition B: Approved by 80.6% of voters.

Proposition B would set term limits for City Council members. Council members who have served three consecutive terms of office must wait two years before running for Council again. They can still run for mayor.

Proposition C: Approved by 81.53% of voters.

Proposition C would set term limits for the mayor, who would also have to take a two-year break after four consecutive terms.

Proposition D: Approved by 90.24% of voters.

Proposition D would require all regular City Council meeting agendas to have a citizen comment period and question-and-answer session with the press, listed on the agenda.

Proposition E: Approved by 55.67% of voters.

Proposition E would allow for City Council members to remove the city manager with a vote from four City Council members instead of five.

Proposition F: Approved by 50.05% of the vote.

Proposition F would remove the requirement for City Council members to approve assistant city manager appointments.

Proposition G: Approved by 53.73% of voters.

Proposition G would remove the requirement for City Council to approve the appointment of assistant city clerks.

Proposition H: Approved by 60.25% of voters.

Proposition H would change the residency requirement for the city clerk to include all of Hays County and outside city limits. Currently the city clerk must live in San Marcos.

Proposition I: Approved by 51.18% of voters.

Proposition I would remove the requirement for City Council to approve the appointment of a municipal court clerk and assistant clerks.

Proposition J: Rejected by 68.27% of voters.

Proposition J would remove the residency requirement for the presiding judge of the city municipal court.

Proposition K: Rejected by 53.16% of voters.

Proposition K would remove the requirement for City Council to approve the appointment of assistant city attorneys.

Proposition L: Approved by 79.9% of voters.

Proposition L would make it so that no action from the planning and zoning commission could go into effect without five or more votes from commission members.

Proposition M: Approved by 91.2% of voters.

Proposition M would require the charter review commission to create and present a final report of its recommendations to City Council.

Voter Turnout

Nearly 12% of 155,158 registered voters in Hays County cast ballots. There were also elections in Buda, Kyle, and Wimberley ISD. Visit the county website for the full list of results.

Updated: November 3, 2021 at 4:17 PM CDT
This post has been updated to show Prop H squeaked by with 50.05% of the vote.
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