In Black America Podcast: Dr. Richard J. Reddick Reflects on Michael Brown’s Death

Oct 13, 2014

Dr. Richard J. Reddick, Ed.D.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Dr. Richard J. Reddick, associate professor and coordinator at the University of Texas at Austin's College of Education, and a member of the 100 Black Men of Austin.

With the recent events in Ferguson, professor Reddick felt is was necessary for him to express his views in an op-ed piece, writing that "nearly twice a week in this country, a White police officer killed an African American person from 2005 to 2012. Nearly nine percent of Whites killed during this period were under the age of 21, compared to 18% of African Americans."

Michael Brown’s tragic fate has a depressing sense of familiarity to it. The unimaginable pain of a family and community’s loss, the necessary press reaction, and the fading of a young man’s memory have become tragically routine.  

The overall concept of the 100 Black Men began in New York in 1963 when a group of concerned African American men began to meet to explore ways of improving conditions in their community. The group eventually adopted the name, “100 Black Men, Inc.” as a sign of solidarity. These men envisioned an organization that would implement programs designed to improve the quality of life for African Americans and other minorities. They also wished to ensure the future of their communities by aiming an intense number of resources toward youth development.

The 100 Black Men of Austin strives to create an environment where Black men, regardless of socioeconomic status or educational background, can grow and take an active role in improving our own quality of life, enhancing the educational and economic opportunities for all African Americans through mentoring and collaborating with other organizations.