Election Updates: Gandhi Concedes To Siegel, Casteñada Grabs Spot On Railroad Commission Ballot

Jul 14, 2020

It's Election Day in Texas for the primary runoff elections. We'll be sharing photos and updates on the election throughout the day Tuesday. If you have a tip, send it to us at news@KUT.org. Find election results here

Voters at Joslin Elementary School in Austin on Election Day.
Credit Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Malhotra almost certain to keep judgeship on Travis County's domestic violence court

Incumbent Dimple Malhotra beat challenger Margaret Chen Kercher in the Democratic primary runoff for Travis County Court at Law No. 4. The court deals almost exclusively with misdemeanor domestic violence cases.

There is no Republican in the race in November, so Malhotra is almost guaranteed to win the seat. She was appointed last fall to fill a vacancy on the court, so this will be her first full term.

– Matt Largey

Donna Imam will face John Carter in U.S. House race

Donna Imam will be the Democratic nominee in Texas’ 31st Congressional District election this fall. Her opponent Christine Mann conceded the primary runoff to Imam, who had a significant lead in votes.

The tech engineer will face longtime Republican incumbent John Carter in November. Drawing from her background in the nonprofit sector, she has been outspoken in reforms of Texas' health care infrastructure and racial justice.

— Allyson Ortegon

Isaac declares victory in Republican primary runoff for Texas House District 45

Carrie Isaac beat Hays County native Kent “Bud” Wymore in the Republican primary runoff for Texas House District 45. 

Isaac will take on incumbent state Rep. Erin Zwiener, who was elected in 2018 as the first Democrat to win the seat since 2010, in the swing district that GOP leaders are targeting this year.

The district covers parts of Hays and Blanco counties.  

— Riane Roldan

Pete Sessions and Rick Kennedy get on November ballot for U.S. House seat

Pete Sessions will be the Republican nominee for Texas' 17th District in November after his opponent, Renee Swann, conceded the race. Sessions will face Rick Kennedy, who won the Democratic nomination against David Jaramillo in the runoff.

Sessions and Kennedy are competing for the seat left vacant when Rep. Bill Flores retired. Sessions served as a representative in Congress for 22 years in District 5 and District 32 before losing his reelection bid in 2018. The Waco native has been outspoken in his support of President Trump, especially on immigration policy, and emphasized his pro-gun and pro-life values.

Kennedy also returned after a failed bid against Flores in 2018. The software engineer from Pflugerville has focused on health care reform and addressing climate change. 

– Allyson Ortegon

Pritesh Gandhi concedes to Mike Siegel in Democratic runoff

Mike Siegel will be the Democratic candidate for Texas’ 10th Congressional District election in November. Siegel will be up against Republican Michael McCaul, who has held the seat for 16 years.

Siegel ran against McCaul in 2018 and lost by only four points, which has made this longtime Republican seat a national race to watch.

Siegel’s progressive politics got him endorsements from Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren. He beat Pritesh Gandhi, an Austin-based doctor, in Tuesday’s runoff.  

— Claire McInerney

Castañeda grabs seat on ballot in November for Railroad Commission

Chrysta Castañeda is the presumed winner of the Democratic primary runoff for Railroad Commission of Texas. Despite its name, the railroad commission regulates the Texas oil and gas industry.

Castañeda is a Dallas-based energy lawyer whose campaign focused on environmental issues, including reducing the flaring of natural gas in Texas oilfields. If results hold, she will face Republican Jim Wright in the general election for a chance to serve on the three-member Railroad Commission.

Wright, who owns an oilfield service company, beat incumbent Railroad Commissioner Ryan Sitton in the Republican primary in March.

– Mose Buchele

37,000 voters have cast a ballot as of 6 p.m.

More than 37,000 people voted on Election Day in Travis County as of 6 p.m., Travis County Clerk Dana DeBeauvoir said in a tweet.

Polls close at 7 p.m. If you're in line by then, you'll be able to vote.

Short lines at most Austin-area polling locations

As of 3:21 p.m., only three polling locations on Travis County's wait time map are showing up as "yellow," meaning a 10-20 minute wait. The three locations — two in Northwest Austin and one in Bee Cave — are all showing 15 minute waits.

Every other polling location in the county is currently showing up as a short (up to 10 minutes) or nonexistent wait time.

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