Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools - Part II

Aug 3, 2016

Dr. Monique W. Morris is an author and social justice scholar with more than 20 years of experience in the areas of social justice & civil rights.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. concludes his conversation with Dr. Monique W. Morris, Ed.D., education scholar, co-founder of the National Black Women’s Justice Institute, and author of ‘PUSHOUT: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools.’

PUSHOUT: is a discussion about the experiences of African American girls across the country whose intricate lives are misunderstood, highly judged–by teachers, administrators, and the justice system–and degraded by the very institutions charged with helping them flourish.

Morris shows how, despite obstacles, stigmas, stereotypes, and despair, African American girls still find ways to breathe remarkable dignity into their lives in classrooms, juvenile facilities, and beyond.

Each year, millions of U.S. students face expulsion or suspension. According to research from the Department of Education Civil Rights Data Collection, seven million of the almost 50 million U.S. students faced in-school or out-of-school suspension in 2011- 2012, the most recent year for which data is available. About 130,000 were expelled.