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00000175-b316-d35a-a3f7-bbdefeea0000Each week on Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke, explore different aspects of human behavior and the brain.In conversations hosted by producer Rebecca McInroy, the two renowned psychologists cover everything from the effects of sugar on the brain, to what's happening in our minds while we sleep, and much, much more.Listen to the Two Guys every Friday at 7:51 a.m., 1:49 and 4:51 p.m. on KUT-FM. You can always dig into the posts below or checkout and subscribe to podcasts via iTunes. We'd love to know what you're curious about! Email us your topics and suggestions at twoguys@kut.org. And follow Two Guys on Twitter: @2GoYH

Are We Wired to Need Greed?

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Is greed good?  Is greed a human instinct?  Why are some people inclined to hoard?

For some individuals, greed and selfishness are much more commonly displayed than generosity. So, it might be fair to say greed feels more natural for some. On the other hand, most might say they favor unselfishness.

In this installment of "Two Guys on Your Head" Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke discuss whether greed is instinctual or not.

This discussion depends largely on the social nature of humans. Sure, we're all individuals with our own prerogatives, but we can often gain more by cooperating within our community.  Working together with the people around us is usually mutually beneficial for all.

There is an inherent conflict between selfish behaviors (like greed), and the equity instinct – an instinct among most communal animal species, not just humans. Believe it or not, that conflict  suggests we are naturally programmed to have an instinct to share resources equally.

Now that's something worth pondering.

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