Abortion Rights

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. for KUT

Four Austin City Council members want the city to help low-income women obtain abortions – without the city actually paying for the procedure.

Missouri is within days of losing its last remaining health center that provides abortions. Unless a court intervenes, it will become the first state in the nation without such a clinic.

Planned Parenthood officials say they are filing a lawsuit in state court Tuesday, asking for a restraining order to prevent its St. Louis clinic from being forced to stop offering the procedure after a state license expires Friday.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

State lawmakers started this year’s legislative session with the intention of tackling bipartisan issues — namely, education and property taxes. Last week, though, abortion politics complicated that goal.

Cheryl Gerber for The Texas Tribune

NEW ORLEANS ­— The federal Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals heard arguments Monday morning about whether Texas should be able to ban doctors from performing the most common second-trimester abortion procedure, called dilation and evacuation.

Callie Richmond for The Texas Tribune

State and reproductive rights attorneys are going head to head again in federal court on Monday to argue whether Texas should require health providers to cremate or bury fetal remains.

“It’s a tough case for everybody,” U.S. District Judge David Alan Ezra said Friday during a pretrial hearing. In January, he had granted an injunction blocking a state fetal remains burial rule, but he said last week that the previous decision is no indication of how he would rule in the trial.

Bob Daemmrich for The Texas Tribune

Texas women would have to pay a separate health insurance premium to get coverage for non-emergency abortions — what an opponent dubbed "rape insurance" — under a bill given early approval by the Texas House on Tuesday.

Bob Daemmrich for The Texas Tribune

Texas is heading to court over a state law going into effect in September banning the most common second-trimester abortion procedure.  

The Center for Reproductive Rights and Planned Parenthood announced on Thursday they're suing over a provision in Texas' Senate Bill 8 bill that outlaws dilation and evacuation abortions. In that procedure, a doctor uses surgical instruments to grasp and remove pieces of fetal tissue. SB 8 only allows the procedure to be done if the fetus is deceased.

From Texas Standard:

When the Texas Legislature passed the Woman’s Right to Know Act, abortion rights advocates decried what they saw as a paternalistic attitude on the part of majority-male sponsors of the law. The law requires patients seeking an abortion to wait 24 hours before the procedure and to be informed of potential medical risks. It also tightly regulates where abortions can be performed. 

This session, at least one legislator has decided to fight fire with ... irony?

Allison Shelley for Texas Tribune

From The Texas Tribune: As he considers a final ruling on the state's fetal remains burial rule, U.S. District Court Judge Sam Sparks is delaying the start date of the rule for at least another three weeks.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

Texas abortion providers are facing off against state officials in court today.

In hearings today and Wednesday,  providers will ask a federal judge to strike down the state's fetal burial rule, which requires medical providers to bury or cremate fetal remains following a miscarriage or abortion, regardless of how long a woman has been pregnant.

Eric Schlegel for the Texas Tribune

The Center for Reproductive Rights announced it is filing a federal lawsuit today against the State of Texas over a rule set to go into effect Dec. 19. The rule requires abortion providers and hospitals to bury or cremate fetal remains from miscarriages and abortions – regardless of gestation time or a woman’s wishes.

Kevin Lamarque/REUTERS

Texas could be on the hook for more than $4.5 million as part of its failed legal battle to defend its 2013 abortion restrictions, which the U.S. Supreme struck down as unconstitutional in June.

Miguel Guitierrez Jr. for KUT News

For many women in Texas, abortions are getting harder to obtain.

The cost of the procedure is increasing, and so are the distances people have to travel to get one.

For some, that’s making it almost impossible to get an abortion, but there are groups here in Austin working to transport women to clinics far from home and help them cover the costs.


MIguel Gutierrez Jr. for KUT News

More than half of Texas’ abortion clinics have closed in the past few years, thanks to the state’s controversial abortion law House Bill 2. As a result, the distance some women have to travel to get the procedure has increased fourfold. That’s according to a new study from the Texas Policy Evaluation Project.

Allison Shelley via Texas Tribune

The U.S. Supreme Court is blocking a Louisiana law that requires doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital. Friday’s decision came just days after the court heard oral arguments regarding a similar Texas law. And the ruling points to the larger ramifications of an expected ruling on the Texas case before the court.

Planned Parenthood Sues Texas Over Medicaid Removal

Nov 23, 2015
Tamir Khalifa/Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune: Planned Parenthood’s Texas affiliates on Monday filed a federal lawsuit to keep state health officials from booting them from the state’s Medicaid program.

Following Texas’ announcement in October that it would stop funding any care for poor women at Planned Parenthood clinics — a response to what state officials called “acts of misconduct” revealed in undercover anti-abortion videos — the women’s health organization is asking the courts for a reprieve.