American History

Savana Dunning/Texas Standard

From Texas Standard:

The American West isn’t a fixed idea; its scope and definition can change depending on whom you ask. So how does Texas fit into it? University of Texas historian H. W. Brands tries to answer that question and more in his new book, “Dreams of El Dorado: A History of the American West.” In it, he invites readers to rethink the West, how Texas fits into it, and what the West meant to Americans in the past and what it means to them today. 

book cover, "The Meanest Man in Congress"
Shelly Brisbin/Texas Standard

From Texas Standard:

The list of notable Texans to serve in the U.S. House is a long one. Names like Sam Rayburn, "Cactus Jack" Garner, Barbara Jordan and Lyndon B. Johnson have been lionized through history. But that parade of names often leaves someone out: Congressman Jack Brooks.

From Texas Standard.

In the present moment, all eyes are on the separation of families at the U.S.-Mexican border. However, Vance Blackfox can’t help but look back and remember the separations of his people in years past.

Colin M. Lenton

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Amy Hill Hearth, journalist and author of Streetcar to Justice: How Elizabeth Jennings Won the Right to Ride in New York.

Hearth talks about Elizabeth Jennings’ refusal to leave a segregated streetcar in Manhattan, how the African-American community of New York came together to fight segregation in public transportation, and how a future president represented Jennings in court.

LBJ Library photo by Yoichi Okamoto

From Texas Standard.

In September of 1971, hundreds of thousands of people packed Texas Stadium in Irving over 10 days. It wasn’t for a Dallas Cowboys game. They were there to see Christian evangelist Billy Graham.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. presents a tribute to the late Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Featured on the program are former United Nations Ambassador Andrew Young, the Rev. Jesse Jackson, former President Barack Obama, and D’ Army Bailey.

Barbara Brannon/Flickr Creative Commons

From Texas Standard.

The streets in front of the State Capitol building will be blocked off this weekend to make room for white tents and long tables piled high with books. Think of that new book smell – that’s the smell of the upcoming Texas Book Festival.

Some of the most celebrated authors in the world will be descending on Austin. The whole event is free, from browsing books to attending author signings.

Lois Kim, the festival’s executive director, says over 300 authors are coming to the event – including Tom Hanks, the Bush sisters, Dan Rather, and celebrity chef Mark Bittman. She says they’re also expecting literary stars like Walter Isaacson and Jennifer Egan.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with the Honorable Michael Tubbs mayor of Stockton, CA.

During the 20th century, Stockton was a commercial hub between Sacramento and San Francisco. It had military installations and was regularly used as a Hollywood set. But when Tubbs grew up there in the 1990's, gunshots whizzed in the streets and more than half of the city’s high schoolers dropped out before graduation.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. concludes his conversation with Isaac Newton Farris, Jr., former CEO at the King Center, grandson of Rev. Martin Luther King Sr. and nephew of Dr. King Jr.

In this new foreword to the book, King, Sr.’s grandson Isaac Newton Farris, Jr. shares what "Daddy King" meant to him as a family member, and discusses the far-reaching legacy of King, Sr.’s activism for civil rights and racial justice. 

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Jeff Ballou, Al Jazeera Media Network News editor, and the 110th president of the National Press Club.

Ballou is the first African American man to hold the position, and will mark the first time someone from a non-U.S. and non-Western-based television network has been elected president of the National Press Club.

On This week’s program, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr speaks with Margot Lee Shetterly, author of ‘Hidden Figures: The American Dream And The Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Help Win the Space Race.’

U.S. NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. presents a tribute to the late Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

During the less than 13 years of King’s leadership of the civil rights movement, from December 1955 until April 4, 1968, African-Americans achieved more genuine progress toward racial equality in America than the previous 350 years had produced. King is widely regarded as America’s preeminent advocate of nonviolence and one of the greatest nonviolent leaders in world history.

jpegthedesultorylifeandtimes.blogspot

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with late Dr. John Hope Franklin, Ph.D.

Cornell University

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Dr. Edward E. Baptist, Professor in the Department of History, and House Dean, Becker House at Cornell University.

Americans tend to cast slavery as a pre-modern institution—the nation’s original sin, perhaps, but isolated in time and divorced from America’s later success. But to do so robs the millions who suffered in bondage of their full legacy.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with the late Alex Haley.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Dr. Aldon Morris, Leon Forrest Professor of Sociology and African American Studies at Northwestern University, and author of ‘The Scholar Denied: W.E.B. Du Bois: The Birth of Modern Sociology.’

Cornell University

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Dr. Edward E. Baptist, Professor in the Department of History, and House Dean, Becker House at Cornell University.

Americans tend to cast slavery as a pre-modern institution—the nation’s original sin, perhaps, but isolated in time and divorced from America’s later success. But to do so robs the millions who suffered in bondage of their full legacy.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Clarence Page, syndicated columnist with the Chicago Tribune and author of "Culture Worrier."

Twice a week, Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Page addresses the social, economic and political issues affecting Americans. Writing with passion and style, Page delivers lively commentary on today's pressing issues, such as crime, education, housing, hunger and bigotry.

The Legacy of African American Entrepreneurship

Apr 28, 2014
The University of Texas at Austin

  On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Dr. John Sibley Butler, Ph.D. Butler holds the J. Marion West Chair in Constructive Capitalism and the Herb Kelleher Chair in Entrepreneurship at the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin. Also, he is director of the Herb Kelleher Center for Entrepreneurship and a professor of Management and Sociology.

facebook.com/theshoeburnin

It started one night with a box of shoes. 

Some Alabama artists ran out of firewood and, they surmised, a box of shoes seemed an appropriate enough substitute for traditional kindling. So began the first shoe burning — a well-kept Southern literary tradition of telling stories for each sole burned.  

In Shoe Burnin': Stories of Southern Soul over a dozen authors and songwriters collected their tales in a combination of musical and literary sojourns.

John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with late Dr. John Hope Franklin, Ph.D.