Americans With Disabilities Act

Executive Office of the President of the United States / Public domain

From Texas Standard:

On July 26, 1990, President George H.W. Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act.

The landmark law turns 30 this Sunday. The ADA bars discrimination against people with disabilities in housing, public accommodation and employment. It provides protections that many may assume have always been the law of the land. But before the ADA, many people with disabilities lived in institutional settings, often found it difficult to  enter public places and had no recourse when denied a job. 

Someone in a wheelchair
Pixabay

From Texas Standard:

A new investigative report finds that each day, airlines lose or damage 29 wheelchairs or electric scooters used by people with disabilities. And new data released this week by the U.S. Department of Transportation shows that airlines damaged or lost nearly 8,000 mobility aids during the first nine months of this year.

Maryland GovPics/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

The  U.S. Census Bureau estimates that around 40 million Americans, or about 12 percent of the population, are living with a disability. Over the years, the federal government has instituted a number of laws to aid in access, employment, and education for those individuals. But a new bill passed by the U.S. House Thursday will roll back those protections.

Ilana Panich-Linsman/KUT

UPDATE: Through the All Access challenge, Archer Hadley raised over $82,000 to go towards automatic doors for Austin High School, doubling his initial goal.

Original post (Oct. 28, 2014): An Austin High School senior with cerebral palsy is inviting students and staff at Austin High to challenge themselves, and each other, to spend one school day in a wheelchair. The goal is to raise enough money to install five automatic door openers at the school. 

Inspired by the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, senior Archer Hadley created the challenge in which each participant is nominated and pays $20. If you deny the challenge, that’ll also cost you $20. It lasts for the next two weeks, and Austin High students and staff can challenge anyone to participate.

Lex Frieden
Image courtesy the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

The University of Texas system is filled with experts researching a wide range of topics, but coordinating them to help the tens of thousands of Texans living with physical disabilities is no easy task. Just ask UT Health professor Lex Frieden. He was handed that responsibility at the beginning of the month. But says he is up for the job. Lex has lived in a wheelchair most of his life, and was one of the architects of the Americans with Disabilities Act.