Austin City Council

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Austin’s Equity Office is considering how to make good on a report published last April that laid out more than 200 recommendations for how the city can combat institutional racism.

Martin do Nascimento for KUT

Austin’s police union says it’s ready to resume contract negotiations after the City Council rejected a new five-year contract in December. 

Courtesy of the City of Austin

When incoming City Manager Spencer Cronk moves to Austin next month, he'll have some help. 

Austin City Council members are scheduled to vote Thursday on a compensation package for Cronk, who is coming from Minneapolis and starts Feb. 12.

Campaign finance reports reveal that Austin Mayor Steve Adler is the only member of the City Council who has begun seriously fundraising for re-election.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. for KUT

The Austin Police Association says it won’t renegotiate its contract with the city before it expires at the end of the month. After months of negotiation, the Austin City Council voted last week to reject the contract, which dictates pay, discipline and oversight for police officers.

Callie Hernandez for KUT

The Austin City Council is scheduled to decide today who will fill the highest ranking unelected position at city hall. Spencer Cronk and Howard Lazarus are the two remaining candidates for city manager.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

The Austin City Council is moving forward with plans for the region’s first-ever fair housing assessment. The effort aims to shed light on issues of housing discrimination across Central Texas.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Austin City Council members voted unanimously to send a five-year contract between the city and the local police union back to the negotiating table late Wednesday. 

Martin do Nascimento / KUT

Austin City Council will not release the names of the finalists vying for the vacant city manager position today.

Council members went to great lengths to keep the selection process secretive last week. After criticism, the council, candidates and the search firm tasked with finding a city manager agreed to make the names public by no later than today. Mayor Steve Adler said that reveal will have to wait – as one of the five candidates has dropped out of the running. 

Martin do Nascimento / KUT

After jumping in an airport shuttle last week in an attempt to maintain secrecy, Austin City Council members agreed Thursday to release the names of second-round candidates for the vacant city manager position.

Up to five names of candidates will be made public no later than Monday.

Martin do Nascimento / KUT

Austin City Council members have been meeting this week with candidates to be Austin’s next city manager — which is among the most powerful positions at City Hall. But the city's gone to great lengths to keep this selection process secret. 

It's declined to name the candidates, and council members appear to have gone to great lengths to conceal their identities.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

A popular shopping center in Northwest Austin could be redeveloped to include hundreds of apartments.

The 17-acre site, owned by Great Hills Retail Inc., currently includes a shopping center, restaurants, a movie theater and a bank. It will be up to Austin City Council to decide whether to allow for new types of development there.

U.S. House of Representatives

In a strange twist of fate, Austin City Council – which currently includes members who’ve been vehemently resistant to President Trump's policies – could get a long-lost wish granted today when the administration releases more than thousands of files related to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Internal emails between U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials show that Austin-area immigration officials tried to highlight the most “egregious” cases of suspected undocumented immigrants picked up during two days of immigration raids in February. 

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

In a unanimous vote, the Austin City Council ended the city's late-night curfew for minors last night.

The ordinance, which made it a Class C misdemeanor for anyone under 17 to be out in public from 11 p.m. to 6 a.m., was on the books for 27 years.

Austin Price / KUT

This post has been updated.

Austin City Council approved a new labor contract Thursday that determines pay, discipline and promotions for Austin firefighters.

Syeda Hasan / KUT

Austin City Council has voted to sue the state of Texas over a law that blocks the city from enforcing an anti-discrimination housing ordinance.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Expand the Austin Convention Center, a city task force recommended to City Council on Tuesday.  

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Austin homeowners could see higher property tax bills next year. 

Under the city's proposed $3.9 billion budget, most residents with a median-value home ($305,510) would pay an additional $118 in property taxes compared to last year. Utility fees would rise, too – with median-value homeowners seeing an additional $60 annually in fees.

The proposed budget also aims to increase the city’s permitting capacity, while maintaining current service levels across the board.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Austin City Council is set to take up a measure Thursday to encourage affordable housing to be more evenly dispersed throughout the city.

Martin do Nascimento / KUT

The Austin City Council has approved some changes to the review process for the city’s new land development code, known as CodeNEXT, allowing for additional scrutiny at City Hall before its planned adoption in April of next year.

Mary Kang for KUT

As rents for residents and businesses continue to climb, Austin City Council has approved a plan to help the city’s artists afford to keep their venues and creative spaces.

Jeff Heimsath for KUT

For much of her life as a homeowner, Joan Reames never noticed the drainage charge on her monthly utility bill. Then the city revised the system in 2015. 

Reames said the monthly fee for her condo complex suddenly increased by more than $2,000. The city bills her homeowner’s association and then the cost is split among the residents.

Martin do Nascimento / KUT

Early on June 24, 2016, Austin City Council Member Delia Garza checked her watch.

“We’re making a decision about $720 million at 1:35 in the morning after lengthy discussions,” Garza told her colleagues. “After, in my opinion, no real agreement on this.”  

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Austin City Council members are hoping to make good on promises to create a more affordable Austin. Or, at the very least, ratify a plan to.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

Have you ever looked up at construction cranes around town and wondered why it takes so long for things to get built in Austin? Developers will quickly say the city's permitting process has a lot to do with it. Now the city is about to start a new program to hopefully speed things up, but with speed comes a new set of rules.

Marufish/Flickr

Imagine a house. Now imagine the roof. What do you see? Some shingles. Maybe a chimney? But really there’s so much more.

District 7 City Council Member Leslie Pool has sponsored a resolution to make more Austin homes solar-ready. Part of that means leaving roof space on new construction without the pipes and vents that prevent solar panels from being installed.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Attend the Mayor Steve Adler's annual State of the City address with a group of 20- and 30-somethings and you’re likely to catch at least one reference to NBC’s comedy “Parks and Recreation.” In the show, comedian Amy Poehler plays the excitable head of a small city’s parks and recreation department. As Amy Stansbury, 26, knows, the image the show paints of local government is less than flattering.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

When Austin welcomed its first district-based city council in 2015, it was one of the most diverse councils in the city’s history: majority female, its first-ever Latina council member, plus three fiscal and, at times, social conservatives.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

From the Austin Monitor: If City Council Member Don Zimmerman is unhappy about losing the seat he has held for two years, he’s not showing it.

After losing re-election to Jimmy Flannigan – the same candidate he beat to earn his spot on the then-new 10-1 Council in 2014 – Zimmerman said he accepts the will of the voters, particularly in light of how well Hillary Clinton performed in the traditionally conservative northwest suburbs that Zimmerman represents.

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