Austin Police Department

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The Austin City Council passed a resolution today preventing the police department from selling used guns to the public.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

A week ago interim Austin Police Chief Brian Manley was tapped by City Manager Spencer Cronk as the sole finalist to be the city’s new permanent police chief, and now Cronk and the city are engaged in a public input process before possibly bringing on Manley full-time.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Austin is one step closer to getting a new police chief.

City Manager Spencer Cronk says Brian Manley is the sole candidate to take over the reins at the Austin Police Department. Manley served as the longtime second-in-command to his predecessor, Art Acevedo, and was tapped to serve as interim chief after Acevedo’s departure in November 2016. 

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

For more than a year, Brian Manley has been serving as Austin’s interim police chief. Now, voices are growing louder to make that role permanent. So loud, in fact, that Austin’s city manager has said he expects to update people about the chief’s job in the near future.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Members of the Austin City Council want to formally appoint interim Police Chief Brian Manley as the city's permanent chief. If a resolution is approved, City Manager Spencer Cronk would need to make the final hiring decision.

Shortly after the announcement yesterday of the death of Austin's serial bomber, City Council Member Delia Garza made the call to hire Manley permanently.

Andrea Garcia for KUT

More than 400 Austinites gathered Thursday night at Greater Mount Zion Baptist Church, less than a mile from the home of 17-year-old Draylen Mason, who was one of two people killed in three package bombings in Austin this month.

Syeda Hasan / KUT

On Haverford Drive in North Austin, the front door of the home where Anthony House lived has been boarded up with plywood. Save for that, there’s nothing to indicate what happened on this quiet residential street March 2.

Courtesy of the Hispanic Bar Association of Austin

On Monday, 17-year-old Draylen Mason was killed by a package explosion at his home on Oldfort Hill Road. It was the second in a string of three attacks in the past two weeks that the Austin Police Department says are related.

By all accounts, Draylen was a remarkable kid, and there have been hundreds of remembrances in the past couple  days that testify to that.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The Austin Police Department says it has received 265 calls about suspicious packages after two package bombings in Austin yesterday. None has turned out to be dangerous, APD said.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

"We will leave no stone unturned," interim Austin Police Chief Brian Manley said today in response to three package explosions in Austin over the past 10 days. 

Martin do Nascimento / KUT

On Feb. 8, 2016, Austin Police Officer Geoffrey Freeman fatally shot 17-year-old David Joseph. Four months later, a Travis County grand jury declined to indict the officer for his death.

Martin do Nascimento / KUT

By March, all Austin patrol officers will be wearing body cameras, according to estimates by the Austin Police Department. Currently, 658 body cameras are in use; another 200 will be added.

“After that, we’ll be looking to [give them to other] units throughout the department,” said Cmdr. Brent Dupre, who heads the department’s technology unit.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. for KUT

The Austin Police Association says it won’t renegotiate its contract with the city before it expires at the end of the month. After months of negotiation, the Austin City Council voted last week to reject the contract, which dictates pay, discipline and oversight for police officers.

Martin do Nascimento / KUT

Vanessa Bissereth learned of her cousin’s death in the newspaper.

“Of course it made headlines – ‘Teenager Killed’ – but there was no name,” she said. Her aunt had been calling her for five days to tell her what happened, but Vanessa hadn’t answered.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Austin City Council members voted unanimously to send a five-year contract between the city and the local police union back to the negotiating table late Wednesday. 

Kate Groetzinger for KUT

Interim Police Monitor Deven Desai opened negotiations between the city and police last week with a nod to a crowd of activists gathered in one corner of the room. 

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

The Austin Police Department is taking its fleet of more than 400 Ford Explorers out of service amid concerns of carbon monoxide leaking into the cabins.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

From Texas Standard:

The men and women of law enforcement are known for putting themselves at risk to protect their communities, but the Austin Police Department is now facing a new, invisible danger.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Lunchtime is wrapping up at Austin High School, just west of downtown. As students walk back inside, Austin ISD Police Officer Chris Roddy walks out. He heads toward the MoPac highway underpass, where there are some trails. He patrols the area daily for kids who may be skipping school.

Audrey McGlinchy / KUT

Following the announcement of Chief Art Acevedo's retirement, Austin Police Department Chief of Staff Brian Manley has been named as interim police chief. Manley's assignment will take affect Dec. 1.

flickr/snre

Update: The Austin City Council has approved a $3.6 million, six-year contract with Dallas County to send the evidence there for testing. 

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT

Decades ago, the area around the intersection of 12th and Chicon streets was a central corridor in historically black East Austin, but over the years, drugs became a presence at the corner. Prostitution and other illegal activity happened in broad daylight there, and in 2012, Austin police took a new approach to the problem – what’s called a drug market intervention.


While the implementation of a planned deployment of body cameras on Austin Police Department officers is on hold until at least late November, city leaders and public accountability advocates are still working out the issue of how the city will decide when to release video footage from those cameras for public review.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

In today’s politically charged environment, it’s not often you get together with a group of strangers and talk about racial profiling and prejudice. But this week the Austin Police Department is doing just that with a series of community discussions designed to improve interactions with police.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

Austin Police Chief Art Acevedo spoke with KUT's Kate McGee this morning, saying that the department will assist the Dallas Police Department in any necessary capacity and that APD will remain on high-staffing levels for the remainder of the summer. At a press availability this afternoon, he reiterated that staffing plan, but also denounced comments from Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick that blamed the Black Lives Matter movement for Thursday night’s shootings.


Miguel Gutierrez Jr. for KUT

According to the City of Austin’s latest annual performance review released June 22, the time it takes Austin police officers to respond to high-priority calls has been steadily increasing over the past five years.

Miguel Guitierrez Jr./KUT

More power over more highways.

That’s part of what the Austin Police Department hopes to attain in its effort to reverse last year’s record number of fatal car accidents, which resulted in 102 deaths, and limit the number of pedestrian deaths, which totaled 30 last year.


ACLU of Washington via Texas Tribune

Local police agencies outfitting their officers with body cameras may have the option to store their data with the state. On Monday, Dale Richardson, chief operating officer of the Texas Department of Information Resources, told members of the House Select Committee on Emerging Issues in Texas Law Enforcement that his agency was working on opening its state-run storage data centers to local agencies.


Michael Tefft/Texas Tribune

Open carry of handguns will be legal in Texas starting in 2016. The Austin Police Department has been prepping for the fact that, most likely, more people will be carrying holstered guns in public view.

ACLU of Washington via Texas Tribune

The Austin Police Department held an AMA (short for Ask Me Anything; it's a Q&A forum) on reddit Friday morning to take questions about officer body cameras. Technology Commander Ely Reyes fielded the questions submitted on the forum, many of which focused on who'd be able to access footage, and how. Redditors also wanted to know more about how the footage would be stored, and how the department planned to insure that officers turned cameras on and off at appropriate times.

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