Black Lives Matter

Austin Price for KUT

June 19 marks Juneteenth, a celebration of the de facto end of slavery in the United States.

For hundreds of thousands of African-Americans stuck in pretrial detention – accused but not convicted of a crime, and unable to leave because of bail – that promise remains unfulfilled. And coming immediately after Father’s Day, it’s also a reminder of the loss associated with the forced separation of families.

Julia Reihs / KUT

Hundreds of community activists from across Texas gathered on the steps of the state Capitol on Tuesday to call on Republicans and Democrats to pass legislation to overhaul the criminal justice system here.

Federal Bureau of Investigation/Wikimedia Commons (Public domain)

From Texas Standard:

Federal law enforcement officials are concerned about what they believe is a new threat within the United States. It's not white supremacists or neo-Nazis, but another politically motivated group.

The agency says "black identity extremists" could be the next domestic terror threat.

But some say the FBI's move is less about law enforcement and more about Trump administration rhetoric and a history of tamping down minority political activism.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Central Texans are expressing solidarity and concern after Saturday’s deadly white supremacist and neo-Nazi rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Courtesy of Kara Henderson

Fatima Mann operates under a simple premise: change doesn’t always come from the top. So when she decided to start a group to advocate for equality in Austin– specifically, equality for black women – she decided to keep it local.

sarowen/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Outside the Memorial Student Center at Texas A&M University a group called “Texas A&M Anti-Racism” practiced protest chants.

Their October 6 “No More Emails March” was one of several demonstrations this semester. This one was in response to multiple mass emails from university President Michael K. Young addressing on-campus racism – action protesters such as Emilio Bernal say doesn’t go far enough.

 


Miguel Gutierrez Jr./Texas Standard

From Texas Standard:

Political wonks and reporters converged on the University of Texas at Austin campus for the 2016 Texas Tribune Festival and your favorite daily Texas news show was there. We spoke to mayors and former mayors from around the state, political figureheads, and two of this year's third-party presidential candidates.

Mengwen Cao/KUT News

From Texas Standard:

Americans use social media for a variety of reasons – to stay connected to family and friends, to share something funny, and increasingly, to get news and express political opinions.

Now, a new study from the Pew Research Center suggests that the way that Americans use and consume social media is closely tied to race. It found that there's a significant difference between the way that black and white adults use social media when it comes to race-based content. Black social media users were about twice as likely as their white counterparts to say that the content they see on social networks is race-related. A similar gap appeared when asked about their own posting habits.

 


Twitter/ayo unreal

From Texas Standard:

Black Lives Matter: we’ve heard it a lot lately in the wake of more police shootings of black men. It came up – in different ways – at both the Republican and the Democratic National Conventions. It’s also showing up in places where there are not a lot of black lives – places like the Rio Grande Valley – with a black population of just one percent.

KUT News

The violent arrest of an elementary school teacher after a traffic stop is being investigated by Austin police. There are questions about the arrest itself, and the way police officers’ supervisors handled the incident.

The arrest of 26-year-old Breaion King, an African American woman, happened last summer. But it was not until this week that Austin Police Chief Art Acevedo saw the police car video of the arrest.

Robert Hart / Texas Tribune

Gov. Greg Abbott wants the targeted killing of a police officer to be deemed a hate crime in Texas and urged lawmakers to send him such a bill to sign during next year's legislative session. Abbott announced Monday his plan to lobby for adding his Police Protection Act to Texas law. 

Vigil Honors Fallen Dallas Police

Jul 15, 2016
Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

Law enforcement officials, legislators and citizens formed a sea of blue Thursday night at the state Capitol, raising blue glow sticks in the air during a vigil to honor the lives of the five police officers who were killed in Dallas one week ago.

Kahron Spearman/Facebook

From Texas Standard.

Philando Castile. Alton Sterling. Brent Thompson. Patrick Zamarripa. Michael Krol. Michael Smith. Lorne Ahrens.

Bob Daemmrich / Texas Tribune

Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick joined a handful of other Texas Republican officials Friday in blaming former Black Lives Matter protests for the shooting in Dallas Thursday night that left at least five police officers dead. 

"I do blame people on social media with their hatred towards police," Patrick said during an interview on Fox News on Friday. He added that, despite the "peaceful" nature of last nights protests, he blames former Black Lives Matter events for the incident. 

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT

Roughly two thousand people, wearing blue shirts and “Police Lives Matter” stickers, crowded in front of the Austin Police Department on Saturday morning. 

Updated: At around 1 p.m. a group of demonstrators walked onto I-35 at Exit 284B at 12th St., blocking traffic, and remained there for about ten minutes. 

Austin Police set up barricades and got the crowd to back off the freeway, at which point they started to walk on 10th St. toward downtown.