CodeNEXT

After the 2012 Imagine Austin plan, the City of Austin began efforts to revamp its land development code in a process called CodeNEXT. The new code will tell us what can be built and where in Austin, and will likely determine how the city will look for decades to come. 

For more on CodeNEXT, check out the CodeNEXT Hub, a partnership that aggregates coverage from The Austin Monitor, The Austin American-Statesman, KLRU, The Austin Business Journal, The Austin Chronicle, Community Impact and KUT.

Julia Reihs / KUT

The city has proposed allowing for denser housing while loosening parking requirements in its latest revamp of rules dictating what can be built in Austin and where. 

East Austin looking downtown at dusk
Julia Reihs / KUT

The City of Austin is unveiling a new version of its land development code Friday, the latest in an eight-year and more than $10 million process.

A land code determines what can be built and where it can go. Austin hasn’t rewritten its entire code since 1984.

Martin do Nascimento for KUT

Austin’s yearslong effort to rewrite the city’s rules for what can be built where is going to take a bit more time.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Environmentalists in Austin worry about methane emissions from Texas oilfields, plastic pollution clogging up creeks and rivers or nuclear waste being shipped through the state. But one thing they rarely worry about is each other – at least until recently, when an initiative called Proposition J landed on the ballot.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The Texas Supreme Court has denied petitions from two Austin residents asking that the city rewrite a pair of November ballot measures.

Julia Reihs / KUT

For the second time in a week, the City of Austin has been sued in the Texas Supreme Court over the wording of a question headed to the November ballot. This time, petitioners are challenging how the city wrote a proposition regarding whether residents should have the power to reject land-use rewrites like the now-defunct CodeNEXT.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The Austin City Council added two items to the November ballot early this morning. The first asks voters about how much say they should have in Austin’s land development process, while the second asks whether to initiate a comprehensive city audit. Both made it to the ballot through public petitions.

Julia Reihs / KUT

The Austin City Council voted unanimously today to scrap CodeNEXT, the controversial overhaul of the city's land development code.

In a resolution, the council said "due to a combination of significant disruptions to the process, CodeNEXT is no longer a suitable mechanism to achieve its stated goals or address the critical challenges currently facing our City."

Martin do Nascimento for KUT

Austin Mayor Steve Adler wants the city to scrap CodeNEXT and start over. 

In a post to the Austin City Council message board Wednesday, Adler asked that the city manager come up with a new process for updating the city’s 34-year-old land-use code. The mayor bemoaned “misinformation” surrounding the yearslong discussion.

Martin do Nascimento for KUT

A district judge has ordered the Austin City Council to put a petition on the November ballot that, if passed, would require land development code rewrites, such as CodeNEXT, to be approved by voters. 

Callie Hernandez for KUT

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is seeking to remove eight of the 13 members of Austin’s Planning Commission. The commission is responsible for making and amending a master city plan, making recommendations to the City Council on proposed zoning changes and weighing in on land use decisions.

ATXN screenshot

Austin City Council members are fine-tuning their goals for a new land-development code at a meeting Tuesday, and they’re trying to do it in a respectful manner. 

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The road that leads to Blanca Torres' home isn't much of a road at all. It's a half-mile stretch of gravel and mud, surrounded by tall grasses. In certain parts, the road dips into stark potholes, and in others, large white rocks protrude from the earth.

Montinique Monroe for KUT News

Austin residents expressed strong feelings for and against CodeNEXT today at the first public hearing on the final draft of the rewrite of Austin’s land development code.

Martin do Nascimento / KUT

Austin City Council members have voted against putting a CodeNEXT petition to a public vote, instead allowing a threatened lawsuit to proceed and a judge to determine whether the city is required to do so.

Montinique Monroe for KUT

Austin City Council members early this morning did not accept the changes asked for in a citizen-led petition that would have required all comprehensive zoning changes, including CodeNEXT, be put to a public vote. Now council must decide before Aug. 20 whether to put the petition on a November ballot.

Montinique Monroe for KUT

A petition to put rewrites of Austin’s land development code, including CodeNEXT, to a public vote was deemed valid by the City Clerk on Monday.

Audrey McGlinchy / KUT

Activists filed a petition with the City Clerk on Thursday in an effort to put all land development code rewrites, including CodeNEXT, to a public vote.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The Austin City Council is trying to figure out how the latest draft of the proposed land development code, known as CodeNEXT, could shape the future of affordable housing.

Audrey McGlinchy / KUT

An anti-CodeNEXT group says it has enough signatures to ask residents whether they should have the right to vote on major changes to Austin's land development code.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Has a foreign government infiltrated the CodeNEXT process?

Well, no one’s saying that. But in his annual State of the City address on Tuesday, Austin Mayor Steve Adler said the "alleged Russian infiltration" on our nation’s politics has inflamed divisions across the country – and highlighted rifts at the local level, as well.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Hispanic families in Central Texas don’t have the same opportunities to access health care, employment and early childhood education, according to a new report from the Austin Community Foundation.

Montinique Monroe for KUT

The City of Austin has released its third draft of CodeNEXT, the ongoing overhaul of the rules governing what can be built where. Staff held an open house Monday at City Hall on the proposed land development code, inviting residents to view the new zoning maps and ask questions.

Martin do Nascimento for KUT

Less than a week out from the release of the latest version of CodeNEXT, city commissions are weighing in on what they’d like to see in this latest draft of Austin’s land development code.

The Zoning and Platting Commission laid out its plan last night for gathering public feedback on the new rules, which would regulate everything from parking requirements to the types of housing that can be built in Austin. Commissioners want to hold at least two public meetings in different parts of town, possibly holding a combined hearing with the city’s Planning Commission.

Jon Shapley for KUT

A group of local nonprofits, government agencies and private companies are taking part in what’s called the Affordable Housing Accelerator to address Austin’s housing affordability issues.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Part 1 of a two-part series on tiny homes

As Austin’s housing prices continue to climb, developers are tapping into the trend of building tiny homes.

Kasita CEO Martyn Hoffmann says the Austin-based company is hoping to make home-ownership affordable for more residents through its space-saving designs.

Martin do Nascimento / KUT

The third draft of CodeNEXT is set to be released next month, after months of delay. City staff gave an updated look at the schedule for the process at last night’s meeting of the Zoning and Platting Commission.

The group’s chairwoman, Jolene Kiolbassa, raised a question that seemed to be on many commissioners’ minds: When is the City Council going to take action?

Andrew Weber / KUT

As the year comes to a close, we're looking back at the stories that defined 2017.

In the Texas Legislature, there were fights: over the so-called bathroom bill and sanctuary city policies. At City Hall, there were more fights: over CodeNEXT and the latest police contract. And on the streets, there were even more fights: over an unorthodox new president and women's rights, ICE raids and immigration policies, and Confederate statues and symbols.

On Thursday, KUT aired a story, reported by Syeda Hasan and edited by myself, about the language used in the debate around CodeNEXT, Austin’s re-write of its land development code.

We’ve gotten a good deal of reaction to that story — much of it negative.

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