Coronavirus

For more on COVID-19, the respiratory disease caused by the coronavirus detected in 2019 in China, go here.  

There's a COVID-19 outbreak at the Southeast Nursing & Rehabilitation Center.
Dominic Anthony / Texas Public Radio

A San Antonio nursing home has seen nearly 70 of its residents test positive for COVID-19. The outbreak at Southeast Nursing & Rehabilitation Center has sent shockwaves of alarm throughout local and county government and attracted national attention.

A Capital Metro bus displays a public health message during the coronavirus pandemic.
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

We'll be updating this story throughout the weekend with the latest local news on the coronavirus pandemic. If you'd like to go through a roundup of COVID-19 news from Friday, read it here. If you have a news tip or question, email us at news@KUT.org.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

A new interactive map on the City of Austin's website is aimed at helping people experiencing homelessness identify locations to get aid during the coronavirus pandemic.

The empty hallway at Dawson Elementary
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

School buildings will remain closed for an "indefinite period of time," Austin Independent School District Superintendent Paul Cruz announced Friday.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

With courts largely shut down because of the coronavirus pandemic, attorney Steve Brand wasn't working at his usual breakneck clip.

Then on Sunday, that peace was disturbed.

It was the governor who disturbed it. Specifically, a statewide order on Gov. Greg Abbott's letterhead.

Independence Brewings sells beers to-go during the coronavirus pandemic.
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

The stay-at-home order that’s kept Austinites spending most of their time at home for the last couple weeks has also increased demand on the “essential” businesses left to supply them with goods. That includes grocery stores and restaurants, but also breweries.

Election signs at the corner of Manor and Airport.
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The Texas Secretary of State’s office sent local election officials an advisory Thursday that was meant to give them guidance on how to handle elections during the COVID-19 pandemic.

NASA Johnson/Flickr (Public Domain)

From Texas Standard:

Being confined and socially distanced from others during the COVID-19 pandemic is difficult for many people. But it may help to know that some have lived in quasi-isolation successfully, and even managed to learn valuable lessons from the experience.

Construction workers work on a building in Austin last week.
Julia Reihs / KUT

When Austin Mayor Steve Adler issued a stay-at-home order last week, he laid out the “essential” businesses and activities that could still be done — as long as people maintained proper physical distance from each other. But there was confusion about whether construction projects could continue.

Austin ISD employee Rosa Montalvo hands lunch to parents parked outside Dawson Elementary School. The district has been offering meals while schools are closed.
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

We'll be updating this story throughout the day Friday with the latest local news on the coronavirus pandemic. If you'd like to go through a roundup of COVID-19 news from Thursday, read it here. If you have a news tip or question, email us at news@KUT.org.

UT freshman Andrew Dareing moves his belongings out of the Jester-West dorm after campus shut down to help prevent the spread of the coronavirus.
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Andrew Dareing is from Mertzon, Texas – a town with 743 people, where the only stoplight is a four-way blinking yellow light.

A "closed" sign on a business on South Congress
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Unlike the last time there was a nationwide recession, folks who lose their jobs during the coronavirus pandemic – and the health insurance that comes with them – may have a backup.

Anabel with her dog Howie at her home in Austin.
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Muchos de nosotros estamos contando el tiempo: los días que llevamos en casa. Los días que hemos estado trabajando desde casa. Los días desde que fuimos a la escuela o desde que perdimos un trabajo. 

Las personas en recuperación están acostumbradas a contar el tiempo como una forma de medir su sobriedad. 

Han pasado 1,308 días desde que Anabel (quien pidió a KUT no revelar su apellido) ha usado drogas o alcohol. Trece años desde que Chris Marshall dejó de beber. Dieciséis meses desde que Kevin Dick ha usado drogas.

A sign outside a Quaker meeting house in Austin encourages people to worship at home during the coronavirus pandemic.
Julia Reihs / KUT

Click here to read in English. 

Cuando el Gobernador Greg Abbott emitió el martes su orden ejecutiva restringiendo las actividades no esenciales, se aseguró de señalar que los servicios religiosos se considerasen esenciales.

Julia Reihs / KUT

UT Austin says a total of 44 students have tested positive for COVID-19 after chartering a flight to Cabo San Lucas, Mexico over spring break.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

This post has local news on the coronavirus pandemic from Thursday, April 2. Read live updates from Friday here. If you'd like to go through a roundup of COVID-19 news from Wednesday, read it here. If you have a news tip or question, email us at news@KUT.org.

Anabel with her dog Howie at her home in Austin.
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

A lot of us are counting time: Days we’ve been sheltering in place. Days we’ve been working from home. Days since we went to school or since we lost a job. 

People in recovery are used to counting time as a way to measure their sobriety. 

A sign outside a Quaker meeting house in Austin encourages people to worship at home during the coronavirus pandemic.
Julia Reihs / KUT

When Gov. Greg Abbott issued his executive order Tuesday restricting nonessential activities, he made sure to note religious services are considered essential.

But in a time when people aren’t supposed to gather, what can and can’t houses of worship do? The governor’s office and the Office of the Attorney General released some guidance Wednesday.

Inmates chat inside a cell block at the Harris County Jail.
Caleb Bryant Miller for The Texas Tribune

Gov. Greg Abbott’s order restricting the release of some Texas jail inmates during the coronavirus pandemic is being challenged in federal court. Civil rights attorneys filed a court motion Wednesday arguing the order unconstitutionally discriminates against poor defendants and also takes away judges' power to make individual release decisions.

Gabriel C. Pérez/KUTX

From Texas Standard:

When social distancing and self-quarantine became common practice recently, all kinds of cultural phenomena emerged on social media. From virtual happy hours to dance parties to live concerts from musicians' homes, creative people are doing whatever they can to stay active, stave off boredom and stay connected with others.

When tours were canceled for Austin-based rock quartet White Denim, they decided to give themselves a slightly different task: to write, record, mix and master a full-length album in just 30 days.

Julia Reihs/KUT

From Texas Standard:

The coronavirus pandemic has become a catalyst for the rapid expulsion of people crossing into the United States illegally at the southern border. Under emergency immigration measures put in place by the Trump administration, U.S. Border Patrol agents have been sending migrants back into Mexico at a rapid clip, according to The Washington Post.

Rep. John Bucy loads a car with donated food to be delivered to households in need in House District 136.
Courtesy of Bucy's office

Many residents in Texas House District 136 got a robocall last week – but it wasn’t a campaign message. 

In an effort to help the community’s most vulnerable residents during the coronavirus pandemic, some local leaders are turning to the political tool, which is typically reserved for campaign season.

The downtown Austin skyline during the coronavirus pandemic.
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

This post has local news on the coronavirus pandemic from Wednesday, April 1. Read Thursday's live updates here. If you'd like to go through a roundup of COVID-19 news from Tuesday, read it here. If you have a news tip or question, email us at news@KUT.org.

Julie Walder, a licensed professional counselor, offers therapy sessions through video conferencing, while Austin follows social distancing rules to curb the spread of the coronavirus.
Michael Minasi / KUT

Mental health care providers in Austin say they're finding it hard to provide telemedicine services to a big chunk of their patients – particularly those with large employer health plans from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Texas.

Planned Parenthood office
Martin do Nascimento / KUT

Click here to read in English.  

El Tribunal de Apelaciones del Quinto Circuito ha suspendido temporalmente el fallo de una corte inferior que bloqueaba la prohibición de abortos en Texas durante la epidemia de coronavirus. 

Updated at 7:40 p.m. ET

America must brace for 100,000 or more people to die in the coming months in the coronavirus pandemic, the White House's response team warned Tuesday.

"As sobering a number as that is, we should be prepared for it," said Dr. Anthony Fauci, a top immunologist helping to steer White House policy on the disaster. "No one is denying the fact that we are going through a very, very difficult time right now."

Spencer Selvidge/KUT

From Texas Standard:

Rural hospitals in Texas face many challenges to staying in business, even when they aren't having to manage the effects of a pandemic.

Three such hospitals are doing whatever they can to prepare for a potential surge of patients as the coronavirus spreads across Texas.

The Texas Capitol Building in downtown Austin during the coronavirus pandemic.
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Gov. Greg Abbott issued an order Tuesday requiring Texans to limit personal interactions that could lead to the spread of COVID-19. The order states schools will remain closed until at least May 4.

Planned Parenthood office
Martin do Nascimento / KUT

The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals has temporarily halted a lower court ruling that stopped Texas officials from banning abortions during the coronavirus outbreak.

Austin Public Health says, along with UT Health and University Health Services, it's investigating 70 people who chartered a plane to Mexico for spring break. Twenty-eight have tested positive for COVID-19.
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Seventy young adults are being investigated for COVID-19 exposure after taking a chartered plane to Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, for spring break roughly 10 days ago, Austin Public Health says.

Of those 70, 28 have tested positive for COVID-19, and dozens are under investigation by the public health authority; four had no symptoms.

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