Coronavirus testing

Cars line up at CommUnityCare's drive-thru testing site in Hancock Center on Thursday morning.
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

It was a little after 8 a.m. on Monday when Austin resident Emma VanDelinder arrived at a CommUnityCare COVID-19 testing site. But when she drove up, she saw a handwritten sign and realized she was out of luck. Testing was over.

Gabriel C. Pérez/KUT

From Texas Standard:

Experts have long predicted that a so-called “second wave” of the coronavirus could hit in the fall. That is especially concerning because, if that happens, it would coincide with the regular flu season.

A mobile coronavirus testing site off I-35.
Michael Minasi / KUT

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People without internet access can now call a hotline to sign up for a free COVID-19 test. Those without transportation can soon get tested at home.

Demonstrators face off with law enforcement in downtown Austin in solidarity with nationwide demonstrations and protests in honor of George Floyd of Minneapolis and, locally, Mike Ramos.
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

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Austin Public Health officials say people who participated in recent large gatherings — like protests against police violence — should sign up to get tested for COVID-19, even if they don’t have symptoms.

The city is expanding eligibility for people without symptoms to get tested for free at drive-thru sites.

A busy South Congress Street on Friday, the first day bars were allowed to reopen in Texas.
Michael Minasi / KUT

Latinos account for three-fourths of all COVID-19-related hospitalizations in the area – a "substantial" increase in the last week, according to health officials.

A man in protective gear takes down information from a driver at a drive-thru coronavirus testing site.
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Texas has seen a noticeable increase in the number of coronavirus tests being reported by the Department of State Health Services over the past week. The state saw its largest one-day total for reported tests to date Wednesday – at more than 49,000 tests, about four times as many tests reported the day before.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The rate of COVID-19 hospitalizations is nearly double among the Latinx population in Austin and Travis County, health officials say.

After 16 days in the hospital, 10 of which were spent on a ventilator, Tracey Sengele says she is feeling much better. But she says the experience of having COVID-19 taught her not to take anything for granted.
Courtesy of Tracey Sengele

Tracey Sengele, 44, has asthma, so she didn't think it was all that unusual when she started feeling bad and having breathing problems during the second week of March.

She didn't realize at the time that she was one of Hays County's first cases of COVID-19.

A line of customers, spaced apart from one another in accordance with social distancing guidelines, wait to enter an HEB grocery store in South Austin during the coronavirus pandemic.
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The first thing you should know about contact tracing is that it’s time-tested. It’s been around for a long time — one of the original weapons in the public health arsenal for fighting infectious diseases. It was used before vaccines. Before antibiotics. Before we knew most of what we know now about infectious disease.

Gabriel C. Pérez/KUT

From Texas Standard:

In this installment of Ask a Doctor, UT Health San Antonio physician Fred Campbell answers Texas Standard listeners' most pressing questions about the new coronavirus.