Dallas Police Shooting

A grand jury has declined to bring charges against Dallas police officers responsible for the death of a sniper who had killed five officers during a downtown rally.

Kendalyn Aldridge

From Texas Standard:

As the sun was setting on the city of Dallas on July 7, 2016, few noticed the SUV parked sideways on Lamar Street, its flashers blinking.

The street was virtually empty, cleared out for a protest in response to the police shootings of two black men a few days earlier in Louisiana and Minnesota. The Dallas protest was one of many scheduled in big cities across the nation.  

Robert W. Hart for The Texas Tribune

From Texas Standard:

After the tragic sniper shooting of police officers on July 7, Dallas Police Chief David Brown was thrust into the national spotlight. Brown's tenure as Dallas' top cop has been tumultuous at times. But after the shootings, the 33-year veteran of the Dallas Police Department suddenly became a rock for the city's recovery.

Courtesy Justin Bohannon

From Texas Standard:

Two shootings in July: one in Dallas, the other in Baton Rouge. First, a sniper shot down five police officers at a protest. A few weeks later a man ambushed and killed three police officers.

It’s been over a month since the two shootings, and there are still a lot more questions than answers. You can’t talk about one without mentioning the other – both incidents were eerily similar. There were two different shooters, both of them black, both upset about recent police violence. There is also another similarity, one that hasn’t been mentioned a lot – they were both black veterans.

The facts immediately bring up a lot of questions, ones about post-traumatic stress disorder, collective trauma and race. But there's one question we haven't found the answer for yet: What would push someone to commit such an act?

Justin Bohannon is a combat vet from the Army. At the time of his deployment he was also one of the few black soldiers in his unit. Bohannon said he experienced racist jokes, tougher punishments and a general sense of isolation. I asked him how he overcame racism on the front lines – he said he didn’t.

 


Flickr/Elvert Barnes (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Police across the country are reeling after the shooting of police officers in Dallas and now most recently in Baton Rouge. Now officers say that they are stepping up security measures - more patrols, a heightened sense of awareness, and now - possibly a new law.

Robert Hart / Texas Tribune

Gov. Greg Abbott wants the targeted killing of a police officer to be deemed a hate crime in Texas and urged lawmakers to send him such a bill to sign during next year's legislative session. Abbott announced Monday his plan to lobby for adding his Police Protection Act to Texas law. 

Flickr/dallashabitatphotos (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Police departments across the country, and especially across Texas, have been reeling from last week's police shooting in Dallas – mourning officers lost, but also operating on a heightened sense of alert.

Vigil Honors Fallen Dallas Police

Jul 15, 2016
Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

Law enforcement officials, legislators and citizens formed a sea of blue Thursday night at the state Capitol, raising blue glow sticks in the air during a vigil to honor the lives of the five police officers who were killed in Dallas one week ago.

Bob Daemmrich / Texas Tribune

From the Texas TribuneLt. Gov. Dan Patrick is heading to the White House to participate in a town hall discussion on race relations with President Barack Obama.

The event comes in the aftermath of the shooting at a protest in Dallas that left five police officers dead and seven wounded. Patrick spokesman Keith Elkins said the lieutenant governor will be among those interacting with the president at the town hall, which will be broadcast Thursday evening on channels including ABC and ESPN. 

Kahron Spearman/Facebook

From Texas Standard.

Philando Castile. Alton Sterling. Brent Thompson. Patrick Zamarripa. Michael Krol. Michael Smith. Lorne Ahrens.

President Barack Obama says the shootings of five Dallas police officers would appear to have exposed the "the deepest fault line of our democracy" but that Americans must reject such despair.


Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

It’s been one week since Baton Rouge police officers shot and killed Alton Sterling, a black man selling CDs outside a convenience store. Just a day later, Philando Castile was shot and killed by police outside St. Paul, Minn.

Then last Thursday, a lone gunman killed five Dallas police officers as protestors were winding down what was, by many accounts, a peaceful rally. The following day, the Austin Police Department ushered 37 new police officers onto the force.


Raymond Wambsgans/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

While police, media, and citizens piece together the details of the shooting of police officers in Dallas last week, we still are left with many questions. One of which surrounds the use of police tactics. In a never-before-seen measure, Dallas Police Negotiators used a robot armed with a bomb to end a prolonged standoff with the shooter. That tactic has now called into question the legality of such weapons and their deployment.

The man who fatally shot five police officers in Dallas may have had plans for a wider attack, the city's police chief said Sunday. Dallas Police Chief David Brown provided new details about the tense two-hour standoff that police had with the gunman before he was killed.

"We're convinced that this suspect had other plans," Brown told CNN, adding that the shooter "thought that what he was doing was righteous and believed that he was going to target law enforcement and make us pay for what he sees as law enforcement's efforts to punish people of color."

Flickr/dallashabitatphotos (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Five officers were killed and seven others were injured Thursday night as a downtown Dallas protest was ending.

Bob Daemmrich / Texas Tribune

Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick joined a handful of other Texas Republican officials Friday in blaming former Black Lives Matter protests for the shooting in Dallas Thursday night that left at least five police officers dead. 

"I do blame people on social media with their hatred towards police," Patrick said during an interview on Fox News on Friday. He added that, despite the "peaceful" nature of last nights protests, he blames former Black Lives Matter events for the incident. 

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

Austin Police Chief Art Acevedo spoke with KUT's Kate McGee this morning, saying that the department will assist the Dallas Police Department in any necessary capacity and that APD will remain on high-staffing levels for the remainder of the summer. At a press availability this afternoon, he reiterated that staffing plan, but also denounced comments from Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick that blamed the Black Lives Matter movement for Thursday night’s shootings.


This is a developing story. Last updated 7:23 p.m. ET

Officials say a gunman shot and killed five police officers Thursday at a Dallas protest against police shootings of black men, in a bout of violence that didn't end until the suspected gunman was killed by police using explosives delivered by a robot. Seven other officers and two civilians were also injured.