Donald Trump

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From Texas Standard:

Over the weekend, President-elect Donald Trump took a controversial call from Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen.

Daniel Reese for KUT News

To say President-elect Donald Trump's incoming administration has public health and environmental advocates worried may be an understatement.  Like a lot of Republicans, Trump wants to roll back environmental protections and some people are already protesting his positions in the streets.

But, beyond protest, how will these groups push their agendas under the next administration? 

At a rally in Cincinnati on Thursday night, President-elect Donald Trump said he would select retired Marine Corps Gen. James Mattis to lead the Defense Department, filling a key role in the incoming administration. Mattis, 66, is famous for both his blunt talk and his engaging leadership in recent U.S. conflicts.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

Despite the results of this year’s election, there are still Republicans who say the party needs to appeal to a more diverse group of voters if they want to win the White House in the future. Specifically, they say the party needs to attract Hispanic voters.

And the case study some Republicans are pointing to when they make this argument is solidly-red Texas.

In a series of tweets Wednesday morning, President-elect Donald Trump tried to tamp down growing concerns that he will not separate his vast global business interests from his role as head of the U.S. government.

Trump is promising to hold a "major news conference" in two weeks to talk about how he's turning his empire over to his children.

Rep. Tom Price, a Georgia Republican, is President-elect Donald Trump's pick for Secretary of Health and Human Services. He is currently chairman of the powerful House Budget Committee.

Price, an orthopedic surgeon for nearly 20 years before coming to Congress, has represented the northern Atlanta suburbs in the House of Representatives since 2005.

Bob Daemmrich / Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune: A Texas Republican elector is resigning over the election of Donald Trump, saying he cannot "in good conscience" vote for the incoming president. 

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry is meeting Monday morning with President-elect Donald Trump.

Perry arrived at Trump Tower in New York City at 11:07 a.m., according to a pool report. He did not respond to requests for comment before entering an elevator.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

In the wake of the presidential election, several Austin City Council members have decided to speak out in support of the city’s minority populations. 

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Attempts to eliminate so-called sanctuary cities has begun anew with another Texas legislative session and new national leadership that has singled out these municipalities. And while Austin is often labeled a sanctuary city, it’s not clear that the city indeed is one.

Photo by Keystone Pipeline System

After last week’s presidential election, the company that owns the Keystone XL pipeline said it was interested in finishing out the project. The pipeline was originally planned to carry oil from the tar sands of Canada to the Texas Gulf Coast, but the part linking up the pipe on the U.S. border with Canada was stopped by President Obama.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

President-elect Donald Trump told "60 Minutes" in an interview this weekend that he plans to immediately deport roughly two to three million undocumented immigrants upon taking office. That announcement is something many immigrants here in Austin have been fearing since election night.

On Sunday morning, hundreds of people gathered at City Hall to show support for the city’s immigrant community, where city lawmakers also pledged local support. 

Less than a week after his election, Donald Trump has begun to fill out the team he plans to bring with him to the White House. The president-elect announced Sunday that he has selected Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus to serve as chief of staff in his incoming administration.

In the same announcement, Priebus' appointment shared top billing with the news that Trump campaign CEO Stephen K. Bannon will serve as chief strategist and senior counselor to the president.

Guy Gorek/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

In late October, before President-elect Donald Trump won the electoral college, he released his plan for his first 100 days in office.

The election just ended and the new president doesn't even take office until Jan. 20. But the transition planning starts now.

Who's going to be President-elect Donald Trump's secretary of state? His chief of staff? His education secretary? Now that the news of Trump's election has settled, speculation over how the president-elect will fill out his administration has consumed Washington.

Keeping in mind the truism that nobody who knows is talking, and those who are talking don't really know, here are some of the names being floated, leaked and speculated about.

Stephanie Tacy for KUT

Protesters have been marching in major cities across the U.S.  –including here in Austin – in opposition to Donald Trump’s election on Tuesday.

On Wednesday, protesters in Austin rallied at UT Austin and then marched down to the Texas State Capitol.

Here's what some of them had to say.


It was perhaps the unthinkable: President Obama meeting with his successor at the White House in the first step to carry out the peaceful transition of power in the American republic — and that successor is Donald Trump.

But that's exactly what happened Thursday morning in what amounts to one of the more surreal moments in American political history.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Jessica Foulke teaches seventh grade social studies at a North Austin charter school. She says her students started texting her early on Election Night as the results came in. Many of them were worried because Hillary Clinton was losing.

At the end of October, Donald Trump spoke in Gettysburg, Pa., and released a plan for his first 100 days in office.

Stephanie Tacy for KUT

Hundreds of Austinites have gathered to protest the election of Donald Trump.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT

From Texas Standard:

It’s the final full day of the 2016 presidential campaign, but in Tyler, Texas, it's not politics on the minds of most folks today. It is, rather, the story of ten-year-old Kayla Gomez-Orozco, the subject of a statewide Amber Alert since she went missing after a church service last Tuesday night.

Her body was found Sunday morning behind a home in Bullard, Texas. About 300 people turned out last night at Kayla's elementary school for a vigil. A family member has been arrested and is being held in the Smith County Jail on a federal Immigration Customs detainer. The suspect had been deported in 2014 but returned to Texas a short time later.

The daily newspaper there devotes its entire front page to Kayla's story and how parents are struggling to talk with their own kids about the incident. This is happening at a time when Tyler and the rest of the nation are settling in for an historic election.

Here's our last statewide editors' roundtable before the 2016 election, with editors from Tyler, El Paso and Odessa.


Beth Cortez-Neavel/Texas Standard

From Texas Standard:

With one week until Election Day, one of the country's most well-known Texans has a suggestion for the rest of the country: start thinking about the day after.

Veteran broadcast journalist Dan Rather, whose documentary debuts tonight on Mark Cuban's AXS network, poses a quandary: even assuming a Clinton victory, why should Americans of all stripes continue to care about the Trump phenomenon?

 


Emily Albrecht/Texas Tribune

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump held a three-percentage-point lead over Democrat Hillary Clinton on the eve of early voting in Texas, according to the latest University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll.

Trump and his running mate, Mike Pence, had the support of 45 percent of likely Texas voters, compared with 42 percent for Clinton and Tim Kaine; 7 percent for Libertarian Gary Johnson and William Weld; and 2 percent for the Green Party’s Jill Stein and Ajamu Baraka. The remaining 5 percent said they would vote for someone else for president and vice president.

Gage Skidmore/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

After last night's debate, dictionary maker Merriam-Webster reported that searches for "hombre" spiked 120,000 percent, as did look-ups for its homonyms ombre and ombré.

Jennifer Mercieca, a professor at Texas A&M and rhetoric analyst, says Trump's use of hombre was a "cartoonish portrayal of immigrants."

 


Gage Skidmore/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

So Texas – had enough yet? Landing blows, calling names, flinging zingers.  If Frank Capra were to make a movie of this, he might call it “Jerry Springer goes to Washington.” Presidential debates are important to be sure, but when debates descend into parodies of debates, what are we getting? Is it a reasonable idea to just say no to a third debate?

For a debate on whether a third debate is necessary, the Standard spoke to two professors of politics.

 


Phil Gingrey/Wikimedia Commons (Public Domain)

From Texas Standard:

With compounding reports of Donald Trump’s alleged sexual abuse of women, it’s easy to forget his earlier outrageous claims. Case in point – the border wall.

The San Antonio Express-News spent the last month exploring just how real a border wall could be and reporter Jason Buch, who worked on the project, says wall rhetoric doesn’t often match reality.

 


KUT Austin/Texas Standard

From Texas Standard:

How are undecided Texans gearing up for their presidential pick? This is part two of a series following four voters through the last month before Election Day.


Marjorie Kamys Cotera/Texas Tribune

Top Texas Republicans are condemning lewd comments Donald Trump made about women — but not backing off their support for their party's presidential nominee.

"These comments are disturbing and inappropriate, there is simply no excuse for them," tweeted U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, who recently endorsed Trump after a months-long holdout. "Every wife, mother, daughter — every person — deserves to be treated with dignity and respect." 

Jamelah E./Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Undecided voters are no myth. So who are they?

Blanca Morales, like 84 million others, tuned in last week to watch the first debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. But it didn’t help her decide who she’ll pick on Election Day. If anything, it complicated matters.

 


We don't really know what Donald Trump paid in taxes, because unlike every other major presidential candidate in the last four decades, the GOP nominee has refused to release his tax returns. But the New York Times offers a tantalizing theory that Trump could have legally escaped income tax liability on hundreds of millions of dollars, thanks to staggering losses from two decades ago.

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