Donald Trump

Shelby Tauber/Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

Republicans from across the country have made their way to the national convention in Cleveland. And even though their home state candidate isn’t the nominee, Texans are still set to leave their mark on the festivities. That includes Sen. Ted Cruz, who's snagged a coveted prime-time speaking slot.

    

Donald Trump laid out his plan for the economy, criticizing globalization and policies that promote free trade, in a speech in Monessen, Pa., on Tuesday.

NPR's politics team has annotated Trump's speech. The portions we commented on are bolded, followed by analysis and fact check in italics. We will update further.

The speech follows:

Michael Stravato and Shelby Tauber / Texas Tribune

Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump leads Democratic rival Hillary Clinton by 8 percentage points in Texas, according to a University of Texas/Texas Politics Project Poll released Monday.

Trump is ahead of Clinton 41 percent to 33 percent in a head-to-head matchup, the poll found. Nineteen percent indicated support for "someone else," and 8 percent said they "haven't thought about it enough to have an opinion."


Shelby Tauber / Texas Tribune

Now that each party has a presumptive presidential nominee, fundraising for the November election has kicked into high gear. That’s why it’s not surprising Republican Donald Trump will be in Texas this week for three fundraising events in Dallas, Houston and San Antonio. The Lone Star State has always been a reliable ATM for the GOP, but strategists say Trump has a lot to make up for with Republicans here – and that includes donors.


Flickr/Gage Skidmore (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

A political analyst outlines three aspects of LBJ's campaign in 1964 against Republican nominee Barry Goldwater that could easily apply to Clinton's coming campaign against Trump.

 


Graphic by Gage Skidmore / Todd Wiseman

From the Texas Tribune: Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton's office sent a cease-and-desist letter Friday to a former official who has claimed his bosses nixed a lawsuit six years ago against Trump University, the beleaguered school tied to presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump. 

Flickr/Michael Vadon (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

When Texas Gov. Greg Abbott was the state's attorney general, he worked on a lawsuit against GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump – then a Republican businessman entering the political sphere on another bid for the highest office in America.

It was 2012 and the top law enforcement official in the state was overseeing a consumer protection team building a suit against Trump University, which had bilked Texas taxpayers out of $2.6 million.

The consumer protection team built a $5.4 million dollar case against Trump, but Lauren McGaughy of the Dallas Morning News says the lawsuit was never filed.

 


Gage Skidmore/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Donald Trump has consolidated much of the Republican party behind him since he went from frontrunner to expected nominee. But there are still plenty of Republicans here in Texas who aren't ready to support him.


Bob Daemmerich/Texas Tribune

Long before Trump University fell in the crosshairs of Democratic presidential frontrunner Hillary Clinton, one of Donald Trump's fellow Republicans drew a bead on the now-defunct school: Texas Gov. Greg Abbott.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

About a year ago, Texas Supreme Court Justice Don Willett posted a haiku on Twitter:

Who would the Donald/Name to #SCOTUS? The mind/reels. *weeps — can't finish tweet*

Maybe those were tears of joy. 

Gage Skidmore / Moritz Hager via Texas Tribune

Former Gov. Rick Perry, who had called Donald Trump a "cancer on conservatism," is now endorsing the presumptive Republican presidential nominee.

Perry, a former candidate who had backed U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas until he dropped out Tuesday, gave Trump his endorsement in an interview Thursday with CNN. 

Rhona Wise / AFP/Getty Images

The Ted Cruz and John Kasich campaigns announced apparent coordinated strategies to combat Donald Trump in select upcoming primaries — an effort to force an open convention when the Republican National Committee gathers in Cleveland in July.

Paul Sancya for AP

The 11th Republican presidential debate reached a fever pitch on Thursday, with Republican rivals piling on Donald Trump as he slung back vulgar insults.

Photo illustration by Todd Wiseman/TexasTribune

Presidential candidates have primaries in two more states this week before turning their full attention to the hundreds of delegates up for grabs on the March 1 Super Tuesday primaries, but what's at stake in the Texas primaries?

Republicans head to Nevada tomorrow. Then, their thoughts and money turn to the South.

Texas Sen.Ted Cruz had hoped South Carolina would be the state that cemented his place as a front-runner after winning the Iowa caucuses.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon for KUT News

Latino voter groups say they are seeing an uptick in legal residents applying for citizenship so they can vote in this year’s presidential election.

The organization Mi Familia Vota held citizenship workshops in six different states this year, including Texas. The group says those events are more popular than ever.

Bob Deammrich

DES MOINES, Iowa — U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas won Iowa's GOP presidential caucuses on Monday, edging out billionaire Donald Trump for the top spot in the first-in-the-nation nominating contest. 

With 99 percent of precincts reporting, Cruz led Trump by 28 percent to 24 percent, according to unofficial returns. U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida posted a stronger-than-expected showing at 23 percent. 

Finally, after more than 10 months of campaigning from more than a dozen presidential candidates, voters get to weigh in. Iowa Republicans and Democrats will caucus Monday night, and the results could at long last provide some clarity to the Republican and Democratic nominating contests — or not.

Here are five things we're watching:

Bob Daemmrich for KUT News

As he pursues the GOP presidential nomination, a key part of Texas Sen. Ted Cruz’s Iowa strategy has been to visit all 99 counties in that state — a strategy called "the full Grassley,” named after an Iowa U.S. Senator who visits each county every year. 

But, some have criticized the Cruz campaign for spending more time last week in rural parts of the state in an effort to hit every county, instead of going to the Hawkeye State’s population centers.


Screenshot from Fox News via Youtube

Texas Senator Ted Cruz took the stage last night in Iowa as the frontrunner – the highest polling candidate in attendance, because Donald Trump refused to show up. So how did Cruz handle the spotlight?


Image via Wikipedia Commons (CC BY 4.0)

From Texas Standard:

One of the most difficult, but edifying, exercises in following the news is trying to get a handle on how what's happening today will be understood in the future. What really matters versus what doesn't. What we think we know right now can seem awfully near-sighted, once those same facts show up in the rearview mirror.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon for KUT News

Voters in primary states begin casting ballots for a new president starting next week.   

So far, many of the presidential front-runners owe their success to their ability to appeal to voter frustration and anger, but other voters say the negative feelings fueling this year’s election are an even bigger concern.

Ben Philpott for KUT News

Texas Senator Ted Cruz has always worn his faith on his sleeve. So it was no surprise when he staked his claim with evangelical voters as a Presidential candidate. Now, those faith voters in Iowa are pushing his campaign to the top.


Photo via Flickr/Gage Skidmore (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

There are only nine days left until decision day in Iowa. It’s the first shot that will set the stage for the rest of the presidential nominating process.

On the Republican side, the U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz is still within striking distance of the juggernaut that is Donald Trump. Although, a recent issues of the National Review has a roster of 22 major conservatives all coming out strongly against Trump.

 


Screenshot from Fox News via Youtube

With two weeks to go before the Iowa Caucuses, Texas Senator Ted Cruz is running neck-and-neck with Donald Trump to win the first state voting for the GOP nominee. Cruz was on FOX News Sunday to try to strengthen his position in Iowa, but he spent much of that appearance defending his campaign rhetoric and Senate record.

KUT News

From the Texas Tribune: Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz has taken his first-ever lead in an early state poll, surging past billionaire Donald Trump to the no. 1 spot in Iowa. 

In a Monmouth University poll released Monday, the Texas senator leads Trump 24 percent to 19 percent among likely caucus-goers. His support in the survey has spiked 14 percentage points since October. 

Gage Skidmore via flickr

From Texas Standard

Some say the crowded contest for the 2016 GOP presidential nod is more spectacle than substance. While there are plenty of candidates to cover, the lion’s share of the spotlight has fallen on someone who’s never even held elected office: Donald Trump.

Huffington Post editors say that Trump's run is more entertainment than politics, so they recently announced that there will be no more Trump in the politics section. Instead, they say, news about Trump and his campaign will go straight to the entertainment section.

Ryan Grimm, Washington bureau chief for the Huffington Post, says the online publication has always been a mix of high- and low-brow news. 

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