Education

Austin ISD, the University of Texas, Austin Community College, Texas A&M University, charter schools, legislative issues, and anything else related to K-12, public education, higher education and workforce development in Central Texas, Travis County, and Austin.

Photo by Nathan Bernier, KUT News

We received a few emails from people asking to know specifically which members of the Austin school board voted for and against a proposal to establish an in-district charter school program at Allan Elementary and Eastside Memorial High School.

We neglected to list the specific trustees in our story on the 6-3 vote to contract with South Texas-based IDEA Public Schools, so here’s how the vote panned out:

Screen capture of Twitter

A Twitter post by the president of the University of Texas at Austin College Republicans was “offensive and embarrassing,” according to the University of Texas dean of students Soncia Reagins-Lilly.

Cassandra Wright Tweeted early on Sunday morning: “My president’s black, he snorts a lot of crack. Holla. #2012 #Obama.” Her account has since been made private.

“We embrace free speech and encourage the open exchange of ideas,” Reagins-Lilly said in a news release. “But we also urge all students, alumni and friends to act respectfully and adhere to The University of Texas at Austin honor code which calls for ‘integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community.’”

Photo by Nathan Bernier, KUT News

A divided Austin school board has approved a controversial proposal to bring a charter school into the district. AISD says it will help improve academic performance at some of its struggling Eastside schools. But opponents of the charter school project have vowed to keep fighting.

Immediately after last night’s vote, which came shortly before 1 a.m., some community members shouted “Shame!” at school board members.

The board voted 6 to 3 to sign a contract with IDEA Public Schools – a charter school operator from South Texas. Superintendent Meria Carstarphen said the urgent need to improve low performing schools merited bold action.

Photo by Todd Wiseman, Texas Tribune

For Bill Powers, 2011 has been a year full of upheavals.

Certain issues were foreseeable for the president of the University of Texas at Austin, the state’s largest and arguably most prestigious public university. State lawmakers were heading into a legislative session with budget axes at the ready, and nationally there were questions about the value of higher education.

Then, in early February, when he should have been testifying at the Capitol about the university’s financial needs, Powers suffered a pulmonary embolism. He was in the hospital for a week.

It was the first struggle in a year marked by high-profile battles involving Powers — to some, the university’s very own Dumbledore; to others, a particularly large bee in the bonnet of higher education reformers.

Photo by Nathan Bernier, KUT News

So much community and media attention was focused last night on Austin ISD’s controversial proposal to outsource an East Austin college prep program to a South Texas charter school operator that we didn’t have time to tell you about other sweeping overhauls the school board approved for next year.

Here’s a recap of what the board approved.

Austin ISD Superintendent Meria Carstarphen says she doesn't know if enough school board members will support her controversial proposal to create an in-district charter school program. The board is scheduled to vote tonight on the deal.

"I actually probably don't spend a lot of time trying to count votes or influence our trustees in that kind of way," Carstarphen said in a press briefing with reporters. You can see her full response by watching the video above.  

Board members appeared split on whether to adopt the issue at a work session last Monday. Board members Robert Schneider, Annette LoVoi and Tamala Barksdale were as vocal in their reservations as they were in prior meetings.

Carstarphen needs at least five of the board’s nine members to vote in favor of the IDEA charter school proposal for it to pass. All board members are present for tonight's meeting. 

Photo by Nathan Bernier, KUT News

As far as school board meetings go, tonight's should be among the most exciting of the year. Trustees are set to vote on a roster of plans that could bring significant changes to the school district in 2012-13. Here’s a quick guide to the evening:

Photo by Joel Martinez, The Texas Tribune

A crucial vote is scheduled for Monday by the Austin ISD school board. Trustees will decide whether to contract with a charter school operator from the Rio Grande Valley to develop an in-district charter school for children in East Austin.

Some school board members have expressed hesitation about a partnership with IDEA Public Schools. One of Trustee Annette LoVoi’s concerns focused on the transparency of governance at IDEA compared to the Austin ISD.

“We are a school board. We are transparent. We hold open meetings. We disclose all sorts of things,” LoVoi said. “I’d like to see a version of that undertaken by any entity that we contract with.”

Photo courtesy laffy4k http://www.flickr.com/photos/laffy4k/

Education Austin has been the lone organization representing AISD staff for the past twelve years, but now Superintendent Meria Carstarphen is opening the door to changing that, and the teacher’s association is not happy about it.

"This is an attempt to marginalize our voice. And we're disappointed that the district is taking this path," Education Austin co-president Ken Zafaris told the Austin American-Statesman. He accuses Carstarphen of seeking to punish Education Austin for its opposition to a proposal to create an in-district charter school in East Austin.

But Carstarphen denies anything of the sort, telling the Statesman that most AISD staff chose not to be represented by Education Austin, and she wants an organization that will serve more employees.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera, Texas Tribune

University of Texas System Chancellor Francisco Cigarroa was one of a dozen higher education leaders from around the country invited to the White House on Monday for a meeting with President Obama about the issues facing colleges and universities.

Cigarroa told the Tribune on Tuesday that the president spent roughly an hour with his guests, including Carnegie Mellon University President Jared Cohon, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill Chancellor Holden Thorp, and Jamie Merisotis, the president and CEO of the Lumina Foundation for Education, among others.

“There’s no doubt that he has a significant interest in higher education,” Cigarroa said of Obama. “He’s very concerned about the increase in student loan debt.”

Image courtesy NAEP

Students in the Austin Independent School District are outscoring other large urban districts – including Houston and Dallas – in one of the most-watched math tests in the country. The National Assessment of Educational Progress’s (NAEP) report tested fourth and eighth grade students in 21 urban districts across the United States.

Photo by Nathan Bernier, KUT News

A plan by the Austin Independent School District to set up a pre-kindergarten program in a cluster of portable buildings at Webb Middle School – something the district calls a “Pre-K Village” – is receiving a cold shoulder from the Austin ISD board member whose district includes the campus.

“I just have difficulty with having four-year-olds in portables in inclement weather, the cafeteria being a portable, and the physical education space being a portable,” Trustee Cheryl Bradley said during last night’s school board meeting. “Even the design I’ve seen gives me heartburn.”

AISD is facing a district-wide problem of elementary school overcrowding. But this proposal focuses on the elementary schools in north central Austin – Barrington, Cook, Graham and Hart – that are overcrowded, even with portables. In some cases, lunch has to start at 10 a.m. and end at 1:30 p.m. just to give all the kids a chance to eat in the cafeteria.

Photo by Nathan Bernier/KUT News

Austin school board members will meet tonight to talk about six major proposals for next school year. One plan would change how AISD operates its two disciplinary schools.

Students at Austin ISD’s disciplinary school for 6th to 12th graders, the Alternative Learning Center (ALC), are absent one out of every four days, on average.  The district average is one in 20.

ALC students are more likely to be black or Hispanic. They are more likely to be poor. And they tend to require more special education services.

AISD superintendent Meria Carstarphen says that needs to change. Her recommendation is for the district to contract with an outside provider to run the program. She also wants to reduce the number of students sent to disciplinary campuses, by providing more counseling and guidance services.

It's not everyday you see the superintendent of a large urban school district perform a song and dance routine in front of the city's education and business leaders, but that's what Austin ISD Superintendent Meria Carstarphen did last Monday with the students at McCallum Fine Arts Academy as part of her State of the District address.

AISD just uploaded the video to YouTube, so you can watch the show and get Carstarphen's assessment of how well the district is educating its 86,000 students

Nathan Bernier, KUT News

The Austin Independent School District’s superintendent says there will be no layoffs this school year. Meria Carstarphen made the announcement this morning during her 2011 State of the District Address inside McCallum High School's new performing arts center.  Carstarphen said she will ask the school board to lift the financial emergency declaration made back in February.

Photo by Jeff Heimsath for KUT News

If previous years are any indication, don’t expect big surprises during Austin schools Superintendent Meria Carstarphen’s State of the District address tomorrow. She is likely to talk about AISD’s efforts to improve academic performance at struggling schools and how those endeavors align with the district’s desire to better manage its 12 million square feet of facilities. 

Photo by Nathan Bernier, KUT News

Austin parents had a chance to sound off last night on proposed changes to the school district, such as partnering with IDEA Public Schools to launch charter programs in East Austin and sending 6th graders in north central Austin to their feeder middle schools in an attempt to ease overcrowding.

Jeff Heimsath, KUT News

A panel of students, faculty and administrators is asking the University of Texas at Austin to raise in-state tuition by 2.6 percent for each of the next two years. The Tuition Policy Advisory Committee (TPAC) delivered its recommendation to UT president Bill Powers today.

The increase would mean the average costs per semester for an undergraduate from Texas would raise $127 to $5,023 next school year. Those costs would increase by $131 to $5,154 for the 2013-14 school year.

At the same time, TPAC is recommending increases of 3.6 percent per year for non-resident undergraduate students and both in-state and non-resident graduate students.

How do you feel about the Austin school district’s proposal to open in-district charter schools in East Austin? What about reassigning North Central Austin sixth graders to their respective middle schools? Or expanding two-way dual language programs to four more schools?

If you have answers to any of those questions, the Austin Independent School District says it wants to hear from you tonight at a public hearing on its Facilities Master Plan.

A framework for the plan was adopted by the board last Monday. The Facility Master Plan creates a process for the school board to make major decisions about the district’s 12 million square feet of classrooms, office space, athletic facilities and other property.

Photo by Nathan Bernier, KUT News

All but one of the nine members on the Austin school board voted in favor last night of adopting the Facility Master Plan framework – a document that will guide decision making over how to manage AISD’s more than 100 schools and 12 million square feet of space.

Trustee Vince Torres, the vice president of the school board, offered a full-throated defense of the document, which was brought to the board after a lengthy and at times combative two-year process.

“Is it going to need tweaking? Absolutely,” Torres said. “But we need to start somewhere. I encourage us to start with this particular document.”

Photo by Nathan Bernier, KUT News

The Austin school district is considering an $11 million plan to open two single-sex middle schools at Pearce and Garcia Middle Schools, and on Saturday morning, district officials will be available at LBJ High School to explain their proposal.

Photo by Britney Schmidt/Dead Pixel VFX/University of Texas at Austin

Europa, one of Jupiter’s many moons, appears to have a body of water the size of the North American Great Lakes beneath its icy surface, according to a new study by a researcher from the University of Texas at Austin. The study was published today in the scientific journal Nature.

“It’s a lake that’s trapped inside the ice shell,” lead author Dr. Britney Schmidt said of the discovery. “It’s formed by warm material moving up from the bottom, causing the middle of the ice shell to melt. That presence of the water below breaks up the surface, and makes it look like icebergs and floating broken up ice.”

“It was just a huge ‘a-ha’ moment for us,” she said of the discovery.

Nathan Bernier / KUT

The Austin Independent School District is negotiating a deal with IDEA Public Schools, a charter school district based in the Rio Grande Valley, to run an in-district charter school in East Austin that targets AISD students classified as “economically disadvantaged.” But a new study suggests IDEA’s educational outcomes may not be much better than traditional public schools.

The study was conducted by Dr. Ed Fuller. He used to work as at the University of Texas’ College of Education. But earlier this year Fuller was hired by Penn State University to direct a research center.

Fuller examined student level data he obtained from the Texas Education Agency and published a study online that makes three critical claims.

Photo by Jeff Heimsath for KUT News

 

Despite the arguments of critics in recent months, Marc Musick, the University of Texas at Austin’s College of Liberal Arts associate dean of student affairs, makes the case in a new faculty productivity report that his institution provides “an incredible return on investment for the state.”

Photo by Judy Baxter http://www.flickr.com/photos/judybaxter/

Social studies standards adopted by the Texas State Board of Education will leave students unprepared for college, according to a new report by a professor of history at the University of Texas El Paso.

The report was prepared by Keith Erekson for the Social Studies Faculty Collaborative, an organization funded by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB). The report’s findings have not been reviewed by the Faculty Collaborative or the Coordinating Board.

“The end result for the students in the classroom is that it’s going to be a lot harder to go to college,” said Erekson, who directs a teacher education program and a center for history and learning at UTEP.

Photo by Nathan Bernier, KUT News

Teachers in Austin Independent School District have not received a raise since 2009, and some school board members are talking openly about the possibility of raising taxes to finance one. Such a tax rate increase would require approval of voters. 

At a meeting last night, AISD chief financial officer Nicole Conley-Abram explained how the district still expects a shortfall of around $20 million next school year. She presented board members with some options under consideration, including a pay raise for staff, without specifying how much that pay raise could cost.  

“Where were we going to get the money to do this?” Trustee Lori Moya asked.

Satellite view of Riojas Elementary school

A group of parents in Pflugerville Independent School District is upset over how they believe the district is responding to accusations of bullying at Riojas Elementary School. They will meet with the district on Thursday night to go over their concerns about campus safety.

The situation for one family boiled over in September when a boy accused of bullying accidentally stabbed an eight-year-old student in the eye with a pencil during a scuffle near the pencil sharpener.

The eight-year old was sent home with an eye-patch. But his parents rushed to Dell Children’s Hospital, where he required surgery to have a small piece of led removed from this eye.

As school board members at the largest district in Central Texas gather tonight to talk about fixing elementary school overcrowding and improving grades at the worst performing schools, they’ll have something else to consider: the Austin Independent School District’s budget next year.

AISD financial chief Nicole Conley-Abram, who recently received an award from the state for budget transparency, will lay it all out for board members tonight.

Photo by Erika Aguilar for KUT News.

Some Austin parents such as Norma Sanchez worry a college education will be the most costly expense for their families. A college fair Saturday at Travis High School was hosted by Con Mi Madre, a non-profit active in Austin schools that encourages Hispanic mothers to seek a college education for their daughters.

Liang Shi/KUT News

Texas public school districts have an estimated 32,000 fewer employees than they may have had if the state hadn’t cut more than $5 billion in public education spending during the legislative session. That includes almost 12,000 fewer teachers.

The numbers are from this report released by an Austin-based school finance consulting firm. Moak, Casey & Associates recently surveyed school districts across the state. 60 participated.

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