Food Banks

Gabriel C. Pérez/KUT

From Texas Standard:

The Surplus Agricultural Products Grant is a program Feeding Texas CEO Celia Cole describes as a “win-win-win.” It’s been around for 20 years and Cole says it helps food banks across Texas like those within the network she leads. She says providing food keeps people healthy, which reduces other costs for the state and, she says, it helps specialty crop farmers by paying them for donated produce.

Julia Reihs/KUT

From Texas Standard:

Companies have been awarded $1.2 billion in contracts by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, or USDA, to redirect millions of pounds of food waste to food banks across the country. The excess food has accumulated as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. 

But a report in Politico says some of these companies have little experience in food distribution or working with food banks and farmers – raising concerns over whether they can meet the needs of the organizations they've been contracted to supply.

Unprecedented Demand Strains Texas Food Banks

Apr 21, 2020
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT

From Texas Standard:

With so many Texans out of work because of COVID-19 stay-at-home orders, food banks are the state’s newest first responders. And the soaring demand is pushing Texas food banks to the limit as they, too, wait for sorely needed state and federal aid to arrive.

Julia Reihs/KUT

From Texas Standard:

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, food banks across the country are tasked with serving those in need from all walks of life. And many people are using food bank services for the first time.

In Texas, food banks are doing what they can to help those facing food insecurity, but they face many challenges.

Screenshot from Twitter/@NtfbVoice

From Texas Standard:

Representatives from Texas food banks will gather at the Capitol on Tuesday to talk with legislators about food insecurity and lobby for ways the state can help. Food insecurity is a bigger problem than some may think. The term doesn't just describe people who are going hungry; it also describes people who don’t have the household resources to consistently buy healthy food.