High School Football

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

Last week in Waco, two teams met to play for the Texas Association of Private and Parochial Schools’ (TAPPS) six-man football division final. The paths they took to get there couldn't be more different.

Martin do Nascimento/KUT

Texans display their obsession with football on Fridays during the fall with "Friday Night Lights" – the nickname for the high school games that take place across the state. The games are a gathering place for fans to show school spirit for beloved local teams. But a husband and wife who used to live, eat and breathe high school football are now speaking out against the sport after their son suffered a severe concussion.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The new school year is well underway, and that means the new football season is, too. And midterm elections are coming up soon. It seems like whether our team or our candidate loses, people have a harder time being good sports – or gracious losers – these days.

Martin do Nascimento for KUT

A lack of referees may make Thursday – and even Saturday – games a regular occurrence – in a state known for "Friday Night Lights."

The gap in refs may be attributable to a seemingly mythical prospect in Texas: There's too much football, so high schools share stadium space.

Muenster ISD.

From Texas Standard.

2017 was a year to remember in Muenster. The Texas city is about 15 miles south of the Oklahoma border, and in 2017, its public high school did something that no other Texas school has ever done: win three state championships in a calendar year.

Natalie Krebs

From Texas Standard.

On a recent chilly Friday night at Fort Davis ISD’s football field, the stands are nearly empty. No more than a half-dozen parents sat in the visitors section at the rural west Texas school to cheer their team: the El Paso Christian Home School Panthers.

Courtesy of the Prairie View Interscholastic League Coaches Association

For many communities in Texas, Friday means high school football.

But when Texas high schools were segregated, black athletes didn’t play under Friday night lights. They played on Wednesday and Thursday nights, while white high schools played Friday nights.