Mass Shooting

WhatsApp/Houston Public Media

From Texas Standard.

After another school shooting in Texas, this time in Santa Fe, calls for action have come from various places along the political spectrum. Some believe that beefed-up school security is the answer, while others advocate gun regulation. Texas lawmakers are talking about how to move forward, including Republican Jason Villalba, a member of the Texas House from the Dallas-Fort Worth area, and Rep. Chris Turner, chair of the Texas House Democratic Caucus.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT

From Texas Standard.

Schools have been top of mind recently, especially when it comes to safety. Staff at Marjory Stoneman Douglas high school in Parkland, Florida are returning to their campus today to prepare to restart a school year that was interrupted by the shooting that left 17 people dead on February 14.

Mengwen Cao/KUT

From Texas Standard.

The U.S. House has passed a bill allowing gun owners with licenses to carry firearms to carry those firearms weapons across state lines. It’s a bill the National Rifle Association has dubbed a “legislative priority.”

Following the deadly mass shootings in Sutherland Springs and Las Vegas, legislators in Washington are also looking for a consensus on improving the national background check system for gun purchases, as well as banning a device known as “bump stocks.”

Diego A/Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

From Texas Standard.

The investigation into what led a gunman to kill 26 people at the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs is ongoing, and law enforcement are still trying to access a key piece of evidence – his phone.

Nicolas Henderson/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

In the aftermath of the Sutherland Springs church shootings, just how far can – or should – other churches go to protect themselves from something similar?

Lynda Gonzalez for KUT

From Texas Standard:

It is impossible to calculate the loss suffered by the survivors of the shooting at Sutherland Springs. Even if victims tried to sue for damages, the most obviously culpable person – the shooter – is dead. That’s often the case at the end of such tragedies.

Mose Buchele / KUT

While the small Texas town of Sutherland Springs struggles to come to terms with the mass shooting at First Baptist Church on Sunday, another Texas community is also reeling.

David Schott/Flickr Creative Commons

From Texas Standard:

At least a dozen of those killed in Sunday’s mass shooting at the First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs were children, and some of them attended the school districts surrounding the small town.

Officials from local districts made the decision to go forward with classes on the Monday after the shooting, far from certain as to how many empty seats there might be in some classrooms, or how students might be affected by the trauma the whole area is experiencing.

Lynda Gonzalez for KUT

The man who killed 26 people at a church in Sutherland Springs on Sunday was in a "conflict" with his ex-mother-in-law, Department of Public Safety officials said at a press conference today.

"The shooter was at odds with his in-laws," Texas Rangers Major Freeman Martin said. "There was conflict between the two families."

Lynda Gonzalez for KUT

From Texas Standard.

Several news outlets have reported that Devin Patrick Kelley, the suspect in a deadly mass shooting in Sutherland Springs, bought the weapon used in the attack from an Academy Sports and Outdoors store in San Antonio. Given Kelley’s history of domestic violence, some are saying he shouldn’t have been allowed to buy a firearm in the first place.

Lynda Gonzalez / KUT

Twenty-six people are dead after a mass shooting at a church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, about 30 miles east of San Antonio.

Gov. Greg Abbott called it "the largest mass shooting in our state's history."