Mobility

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

Austin is in the process of adopting several plans that will guide the future of development and transportation in the region. The city revealed a new guide Tuesday for the future of street design.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. for KUT

For Austin visitors, it’s hard to beat the iconic view of the Texas Capitol from Congress Avenue. But for those who live and work along the corridor, the streetscape could use some improvements. 

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT News

Could streets be like doctors? A streetlight that diagnoses an ulcerous colon, or sidewalk that administers chemotherapy?

That question is what Austin City Council Member Delia Garza leveled at the oft-optimistic Mayor Steve Adler during the last Council meeting before members broke for the month of July.


Spencer Selvidge / KUT

In the photo, a curly-haired woman stares into the camera wearing a red lifeguard bathing suit, holding a long, red rectangular flotation device over her shoulder.

KUT News

Employees of a Colorado-based non-profit will soon move to Austin to begin studying the city’s various commuting woes as part of a partnership finalized Thursday.

"Americans now walk the least of any industrialized nation in the world," says writer Tom Vanderbilt. To find out why that is, Vanderbilt has been exploring how towns are built, how Americans view walking — and what might be done to get them moving around on their own two feet.

Talking with Morning Edition co-host Steve Inskeep about what is wrong with Americans' relationship with walking, Vanderbilt says, "The main thing is, we're just not doing enough of it."