Odessa Shooting

Former El Paso Congressman Beto O'Rourke
Michael Minasi for KUT

Beto O'Rourke may not be running for statewide office anymore, but it's been difficult to tell in recent days.

Carlos Morales / Marfa Public Radio

Twenty-nine people died in two mass shootings in Texas last month. What is the response from Texans and their political representatives? Will these latest violent episodes move the needle on gun policy?

Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick
Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / The Texas Tribune

Two usual political allies — Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick and the National Rifle Association — traded rhetorical blows Friday after Patrick continued to advocate for requiring background checks for stranger-to-stranger gun sales.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott
Jesus Rosales for The Texas Tribune

Gov. Greg Abbott on Thursday issued eight executive orders in response to last month’s mass shootings in El Paso and Odessa.

A line of white crosses dotted an empty lot on an otherwise busy road in south Odessa. The memorial went up several days after a shooting rampage killed seven people and wounded about 25 more in Odessa.

Somber groups of visitors trickled in to pay their respects. They quietly left flowers and balloons and wrote words of encouragement on the crosses in permanent marker. 


A memorial for victims of a mass shooting
Mitch Borden / Marfa Public Radio

Democrats in the Texas House are calling on Gov. Greg Abbott to convene a special legislative session to address gun violence — a move designed to place even more pressure on the state’s top GOP official to act in the wake of two deadly mass shootings just weeks apart.

Shooting suspect Seth Ator's house near Odessa.
Mitch Borden / Marfa Public Radio

The gunman in a West Texas rampage that left seven dead obtained his AR-style rifle through a private sale, allowing him to evade a federal background check that blocked him from getting a gun in 2014 due to a “mental health issue,” a law enforcement official told The Associated Press.

Mitch Borden/Marfa Public Radio

From Texas Standard:

Odessa Mayor David Turner says the aftermath of the mass shooting in his city has been difficult and community members are in shock, but they have also jumped into action to support each other.

Sen. Jane Nelson, Sen. Larry Taylor, Gov. Greg Abbott and Rep. Greg Bonnen
Callie Richmond for The Texas Tribune

After the second Texas mass shooting in a month, Gov. Greg Abbott tweeted Monday night that "we're working on a legislative package right now" and that "expedited executions for mass murderers would be a nice addition."

Law enforcement in Texas released more information Monday afternoon about the investigation into this weekend’s mass shooting which killed seven people and injured 23.

At a press conference Sunday in Odessa, Texas, FBI Special Agent in Charge Christopher Combs said that the nation is now averaging an active shooter incident “every other week,” a broad term used by the FBI to describe someone “attempting to kill people in a populated area.

Not all of these incidents escalate to the level of a mass shooting.

The shooter who opened fire after a routine traffic stop Saturday in Texas, killing seven people and injuring 22, was fired just hours before the deadly shooting.

Seth Aaron Ator, 36, who lived in the Odessa area, had been fired from his job at Journey Oilfield Services after a disagreement, according to Odessa Police Chief Michael Gerke. The shooting rampage, which appears to have been random, ended when Ator was killed by police.

Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, Gov. Greg Abbott and House Speaker Dennis Bonnen
Marjorie Kamys Cotera for The Texas Tribune

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott tweeted Monday that the gunman in Saturday's mass shooting in Midland and Odessa had previously failed a gun purchase background check and did not go through a background check to buy the gun used Saturday.

Camille Phillips / Texas Public Radio

From Texas Standard:

Brooks Landgraf, who represents Odessa in the Texas House, says the last couple days have been “absolutely heartbreaking.” But, he says, he's also heartened by how people came together to show support for the victims of Saturday's mass shooting.

Vigil for victims of a mass shooting in Odessa.
Mitch Borden / Marfa Public Radio

Hundreds of residents from across the Permian Basin came together as the sun began to set Sunday, to pray and honor the victims of this weekend’s mass shooting that left eight people dead — including the gunman — and more than 20 others injured.

8 New Gun Laws Take Effect In Texas Today

Sep 1, 2019
Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT News

At least seven people were killed and another 20 were injured in a mass shooting that stretched in and around Midland and Odessa, Texas, Saturday. The incident was the second mass shooting in that state in less than a month, following a shooting in El Paso, on Aug. 3.

Updated at 3:22 p.m. ET

The death toll from a mass shooting carried out by a gunman in the West Texas cities of Midland and Odessa has risen from five to seven, and 22 others remain injured, officials said on Sunday.

Authorities said a man armed with an "AR-type weapon" was killed by police just moments before heading toward a crowded movie theater, preventing what investigators said could have been an even deadlier rampage.