Politics

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From Texas Standard:

The changing news landscape has been a struggle for many local papers. The Associated Press cites a study that found some 1,800 newspapers have shut down in just the last 15 years. Many of those were community weeklies.

That's bad news for the newspaper industry, but Texas A&M professor Johanna Dunaway says it's also impacting our politics. She co-authored a study in the Journal of Communication that found newspaper closures polarize voting behavior, as evidenced by a decline in split-ticket voting.

ESPN

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks Howard Bryant, senior writer for ESPN.com and ESPN The Magazine,  sports correspondent for NPR's Weekend Edition, and author of The Heritage: Black Athletes, a Divided America, and the Politics of Patriotism.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Dr. Mary Frances Berry, the Geraldine R. Segal Professor of American Social Thought, professor of history at the University of Pennsylvania, former chairwoman of the United States Commission on Civil Rights, and author of History Teaches Us to Resist: How Progressive Movements Have Succeeded in Challenging Times.  

NASA

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Dr. Mary Frances Berry, the Geraldine R. Segal Professor of American Social Thought, professor of history at the University of Pennsylvania, former chairwoman of the United States Commission on Civil Rights, and author of History Teaches Us to Resist: How Progressive Movements Have Succeeded in Challenging Times.  

Dr. Brittney Cooper

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. concludes his conversation with Brittney Cooper, assistant professor of Women's and Gender Studies and Africana Studies at Rutgers University and author of Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower.

Copper talks about race and gender in popular culture, politics on campus, and why feminism needed Beyonce.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with the Honorable Michael Tubbs mayor of Stockton, CA.

During the 20th century, Stockton was a commercial hub between Sacramento and San Francisco. It had military installations and was regularly used as a Hollywood set. But when Tubbs grew up there in the 1990's, gunshots whizzed in the streets and more than half of the city’s high schoolers dropped out before graduation.

Michael Stravato for The Texas Tribune

President Donald Trump is completing his first 100 days in office with an upside-down approval rating in solid-red Texas. 

Courtesy of Matthew Dowd

From Texas Standard:

As the U.S. becomes increasingly divided along party lines, many are losing faith in the American political system. ABC News analyst and Texas resident Matthew Dowd says that despite current partisan struggles, trust in the system can be restored. He explores the topic in his new book, “A New Way: Embracing the Paradox as we Lead and Serve.”

Vice President Pence used a private AOL account to conduct official business in his former position as the governor of Indiana, according to public records. And at one point, the account was hacked and used to send fraudulent emails seeking money from his contacts.

Thomas Hawk/Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Both houses of the Texas Legislature have unanimously approved an overhaul of how the state cares for its most vulnerable kids. It's a sign they're moving quickly to address what a federal judge deemed a "broken" foster care system.

Gage Skidmore via Wikimedia Commons

From Texas Standard:

He didn’t say the word "Texas" – but the Lone Star State was woven throughout President Donald Trump’s first address to Congress. From a hint at a shift in immigration policy to a border wall to increased military spending and beyond.

Texas Standard host David Brown spoke with two Texas congressmen: Rep. Pete Sessions (R-Texas) and Rep. Joaquin Castro (D-Texas) to gauge their reactions to Tuesday’s speech.

Austin Students Share Concerns, Advice for Trump

Jan 19, 2017
Miguel Gutierrez Jr./KUT

In September, we visited Kealing Middle School’s Presidential Politics class to see what students were thinking about the 2016 presidential election. Most of the students wanted Hillary Clinton to win, and many said they didn’t take Donald Trump seriously.

We checked back in with some of the students to see how they are feeling ahead of Trump's inauguration. Here's what they said:

Courtesy Texas Tribune
Pictures from campaign and professional websites

Despite announcing her plan six weeks earlier to resign instead of serving another term, state Rep. Dawnna Dukes handily won re-election earlier this month.

Beth Cortez-Neavel/Flickr (CC BY-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

It's the first day for Texas lawmakers to file bills for the upcoming session at the Statehouse. Competing for the attention and votes of state lawmakers are issues of education funding and safety for the most vulnerable Texans – foster kids.

Lauren McGaughy, who'll be covering the 85th Legislature for the Dallas Morning News, says bill filers often "front-load" so a lot of bills are filed on the first day.


Gage Skidmore/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Something about the events of the past few days suggests there's a word we'll be hearing a whole lot more in coming months, if not years: nationalism.

Jeremi Suri, a professor at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin, says the period between World War II and September 11 was a period of globalism.

 


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From Texas Standard:

If you're a news junkie, it might seem like the presidential election was the only thing worth covering for the past 18 months. But plenty of stories went under- or unreported. What stories have flown under the radar while the nation recoiled at this year's campaign outrages and sat riveted to the horse race?

David Uberti, staff writer at the Columbia Journalism Review, says the way news is distributed puts much of the coverage power in the hands of the news consumer.


Gage Skidmore/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

We're just one day away from putting the 2016 election in the record books – so we thought we'd take a few minutes to highlight the top five Texas moments that shaped the election.

Kevin Diaz, Washington correspondent for the Houston Chronicle, says many of these top five Texas-related moments involve the state's junior senator and one-time presidential candidate, Ted Cruz.

 


Phil Gingrey/Wikimedia Commons (Public Domain)

From Texas Standard:

With compounding reports of Donald Trump’s alleged sexual abuse of women, it’s easy to forget his earlier outrageous claims. Case in point – the border wall.

The San Antonio Express-News spent the last month exploring just how real a border wall could be and reporter Jason Buch, who worked on the project, says wall rhetoric doesn’t often match reality.

 


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From Texas Standard:

Dark money. Sounds evil, doesn't it?

For the past several years, the Texas Ethics Commission has been mired in an investigation of a group called Empower Texans, a right-leaning organization that pushes a limited government agenda and supports candidates who share its values but does not disclose its donors.

As the clock has ticked on a high-profile complaint against the group, concerns have grown over whether the Ethics Commission has what it takes to do its job of policing campaign money. 

 


Kenneth C. Zirkel/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

From Texas Standard:

He was a businessman who liked to brag about his financial success, cracked rape jokes around reporters and kissed "just about every woman within arms' reach."

She was a Democrat who shattered many ceilings, with real-world political experience and demanded that her opponent disclose his taxes.

These two also wouldn't shake hands.

 


Left: Gage Skidmore/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)/Right: Third Way Think (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

It used to be that people concerned about the state of political coverage in America worried about the constant obsession with who's ahead.

This year, both sides are fixated with landing the nastiest punch, one blow that will decisively take out the other. It almost happened in 1988, during the Vice Presidential debate when Texas Sen. Lloyd Bentsen, a Democrat, quipped to his Republican rival, Sen. Dan Quayle of Virginia: "Senator, you're no Jack Kennedy."

 


Ilana Panich-Linsman/KUT

From Texas Standard:

Numbers show a much tighter presidential race than anyone might imagine in what's often considered to be the reddest of red states. The Texas Lyceum released its closely watched polling results yesterday, showing that the race to the White House is still neck-and-neck.


Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

Over the weekend, Texas Democrats met in San Antonio ahead of this year’s presidential election. A question on almost everyone’s lips was whether this year’s election has set the groundwork for Democratic gains in the state.

yourblackworld.com

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. concludes his conversation with Erin Aubry Kaplan, journalist, columnist, educator and author of ‘I Heart Obama.’

Kenneth C. Zirkel/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

From Texas Standard:

One phrase often heard this year: There's never been a political year like 2016. But that’s not exactly true.

Image via Flickr/Kim Davies (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

President Barack Obama delivered his final State of the Union Address this week – and yet still there are those in this country who would argue he was never eligible to be president. These so-called "birther" arguments are now haunting GOP Presidential hopeful Ted Cruz, who was born in Canada to an American mother and a Cuban father. Cruz says it's a non-issue, but one particularly outspoken opponent disagrees.

 


Image via Twitter/Padgett4Texas

From Texas Standard:

The Texas Constitution says there's no religious test for office holders – provided that "he acknowledge the existence of a Supreme being."

So much for prohibitions on religious tests – not to mention female candidates.

The "supreme being" clause went unchallenged for years, until three decades ago. It was then Texas' Attorney General agreed there's no way to enforce any real or imagined constitutional ban on atheist office-holders.

 


On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. presents an encore presentation of a conversation he had with the late Shirley A. Chisholm.

Chisholm was the first African American woman elected to Congress and an outspoken advocate for women and minorities during her seven terms in the U.S. House of Representatives. She was known as a politician who refused to allow fellow politicians, including the male-dominated Congressional Black Caucus, to sway her from her goals.

Image via Hannah McBride/Texas Standard

From Texas Standard:

In times like these, the arc of history is often invoked to make sense of the present. So the narrative goes, the so-called Islamic State arose in the vacuum left after America’s misadventures post-9/11.

Recently, Jon Meacham’s book has been in the news for revelations that George Herbert Walker Bush – Bush 41 – thought his son, W. – Bush 43 – was badly served by Donald Rumsfeld and Dick Cheney. That’s news, especially since the narrative used to be that 43 was just doing his father’s bidding, retribution for an unfinished war.

 


Image via Flickr/Gage Skidmore (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Earlier this month, a lineup in the U.S. Senate press room showed Democrats and Republicans standing together showing rare agreement over a comprehensive criminal justice bill.


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