Sid Miller

Gabriel C. Pérez/KUT

From Texas Standard:

Political pundits, pollsters and activists have been saying for a while that the 2018 midterm elections are likely to result in some upheaval in the ranks of incumbent officeholders. Already, in special elections in other states, Democrats have run strong in reliably Republican areas, and here at home, one senator, and several members of Congress face enthusiastic opposition. But statewide officeholders – Republicans Gov. Greg Abbott, Attorney General Ken Paxton and Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller – face somewhat easier paths to reelection. Still, Democrats are campaigning aggressively.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

From Texas Standard.

Facing potential new tariffs with China, some Texas agricultural producers say they’re concerned about extra taxes on the products they ship to China. But the state’s Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller says most Texas producers won’t be affected.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

From Texas Standard.

There’s a whole lot of potential change right now on the Texas political landscape. Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller has a challenger for his office from fellow Republican Trey Blocker, a longtime lobbyist who will take on the colorful incumbent. It’s the most serious intra-party challenge to a sitting statewide official – at least so far.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

From Texas Standard:

By now, most Texans are familiar with Sid Miller. Famous for his ever-present cowboy hat, the state agriculture commissioner – who's also a rancher and a Republican – has generated his share of controversy in recent months. But this week he's making news on his own terms with a commentary written for TribTalk, the editorial wing of the Texas Tribune.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

From Texas Standard:

Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller announced a trade agreement Wednesday between the state and a group of settlers on the West Bank of Israel. Neither the U.S. government nor the United Nations recognizes the settlements.

Combs: Laura Skelding/Miller: Bob Daemmrich/Bonilla: Youngcl89/Murano: Texas A&M

President-elect Donald Trump has picked former Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue to be U.S. agriculture secretary, bypassing four Texans who had been seen as candidates for the job, Fox News reported Wednesday.

Bob Daemmrich / Laura Skelding

From the Texas Tribune: The race to be President-elect Donald Trump's agriculture secretary is heating up, and two Texans appear to be at the center of it.

Update (Dec. 12) – Commissioner Miller joined Chad Hasty of KFYO in Lubbock to discuss both the Tribune's analysis of his Facebook activity and KUT's interview with him last week and to offer some criticism of KUT's interview with him last week.

As with most interviews aired on KUT, our interview with Commissioner Miller was edited to fit our news magazine program. Our 16 minute interview with Miller was edited down to about eight minutes, which is close to our maximum length for an interview during All Things Considered.

Todd Wiseman, Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune:

Thousands of Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller's followers on social media might believe that terrorists are — in his words —preparing "for their jihad against the state and our nation” from a training compound outside of Houston.

Bob Daemmrich/Texas Tribune

From Texas Standard:

Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller called Hillary Clinton a sexually explicit and obscene epithet – publicly, on Twitter.

He says a staffer posted it, but does that mean he shouldn’t be held responsible?

 


Brett Buchanan/Texas Tribune

From Texas Standard:

With his cowboy hat and boots in a suit, few Texas politicians cut the figure Sid Miller does. Part of his job is being de facto ambassador, promoting Texas-made food and the like.

But when an investigation by the Houston Chronicle alleged Miller's trips to Oklahoma and Mississippi – paid for by state and campaign money – weren't all business, the Texas Rangers stepped in to investigate.

 


Bob Daemmrich/Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune:Texas Gov. Greg Abbott believes allegations that Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller misused state funds when he took two out-of-state trips a year ago should be investigated, a spokesman for the governor said on Thursday. 

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT

From Texas Standard:

Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller's recent visit to Mississippi has him bucking big criticism.

Miller went to compete for prize money – netting over $800 in winnings for calf-roping – and paid for the whole thing using a combination of state and campaign funds.

facebook screenshot/Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune: Don’t expect Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller to apologize over a social media post that appeared to call for the atomic bombing of “the Muslim world” – despite an outcry from critics.

Miller, who is currently on a trade mission to China, did not personally share a controversial photo that appeared on his campaign Facebook account and has since been removed, Todd Smith, the Republican's campaign spokesman, said Monday. The commissioner has no plans to figure out which of his staffers shared the controversial posting, or to apologize, Smith said.

“We’re not going to apologize for the posts that show up on our Facebook page,” said Smith, estimating that 18 people have access to the campaign account. “I don’t know who did it, but I’m not going to start a witch hunt to find out who did.” 

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

From the Texas Tribune: Students eager to purchase soda and fried foods when they return to school in the fall may be disappointed, despite Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller's recent announcement that both will be welcome back on Texas public school campuses after a 10-year ban. 

To the dismay of nutritionists and public health experts, Miller reversed the department's ban on soda machines and deep fat fryers in mid-June as part of a new state nutrition policy calling for more local foods, community engagement and training to help schools serve meals that are "attractive and taste great." 

But many large school districts aren't warming to Miller's initiative.