Super Bowl

John Bauld and Georges Biard/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

From Texas Standard:

Across traditional and social media, there's been a mixture of celebration and criticism following Sunday's Super Bowl halftime show. Some have called Jennifer Lopez's – also known as J-Lo – and Shakira's performance a dazzling spectacle, while others deemed it inappropriate for its skin-bearing costumes, seductive dance moves and political overtones.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Danny Ezechukwu moved to Austin in the spring after his wife got a job with Oracle. He's been working odd jobs around town while he looks for full-time employment.

One of those odd jobs was helping Shannon McCormick prepare for some home remodeling.

growlermag.com

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Chris Montana, owner and head distiller Du Nord Craft Spirits, located in Minneapolis, Minn. 

Montana talks about waking up one morning and deciding he wanted to make booze, being the only African-American craft distiller, and mixing his wife's rural upbringing with his urban experience to create a family business.

Courtesy of RISE

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. presents highlights of Rise and NFL 3rd annual Super Bowl Town Hall featuring NFL players and executives. 

Founded in 2015 by Miami Dolphins owner Stephen M. Ross, the Ross Initiative in Sports for Equality (RISE) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to harnessing the unifying power of sports to improve race relations and drive social progress.

proplayerinsider.com

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. presents highlights of the 31st Super Bowl Breakfast, in which Baltimore Ravens tight end Benjamin Watson received The Athletes in Action/Bart Starr Award. Bart Starr Jr. and former NFL head coach Tony Dungy were also guests at the event.

In his acceptance speech, Watson talked about his family, his faith and his community.

Screenshot via @DanHanzus/Twitter

Turns out, Tom Brady can’t have everything.

The New England Patriots’ quarterback cemented his place in NFL history last night – becoming the first quarterback to win five Super Bowls and bringing the Pats back from a historic deficit to defeat the Falcons in the first overtime Super Bowl ever.

But, while Brady was celebrating the team’s win, his jersey was stolen at NRG Stadium in Houston. 

Sometimes it's better to leave more to the imagination.

That's the thought I'm left with after watching all of the ads that aired in CBS' Super Bowl broadcast Sunday night.

It may be an accepted truism that the commercials are often more exciting than the game. But this year, viewers watching for the ads sat through an uneven collection of spots — of which many of the best moments had already been revealed days earlier.

Unless you're a Seahawks fan, this year's Super Bowl was not so super. Seattle's blowout victory over Denver almost certainly inspired more than a few million viewers to tune out shortly after halftime. 

The real contest this year, as in years past, was among TV sponsors who paid approximately $4 million per half-minute to push their messages to viewers.  Much of the post-game commentary was devoted to who won bragging rights for 'best commenrcial'.  But Michael Webber, Deputy Director of the Energy Institute at the University of Texas at Austin saw much more than the usual ads for beer, soda, insurance and autos.  

Sure, the Super Bowl may be an American ritual.  But if you look a little closer, Webber says, the big game reveals a national obsession bigger than football: an insatiable appetite for energy.

There was a 108-yard kickoff return for a touchdown.

A last-minute drive that could have won the game for San Francisco.

An MVP performance by Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco.

Daniel X O'Neill/Flickr

Are you watching the Superbowl just for the ads? You're not the only one.

Four University of Texas advertising professors will live-tweet critiques of the advertisements during the Superbowl game featuring the Baltimore Ravens and the 49ers this Sunday. The will use the hash-tag “SBAdJudge”. UT advertising professor Neal Burns, one of the four professors critiquing this weekend, said he is looking forward to it.  

flickr.com/deltamike

The City of Houston has been selected as one of two finalists to host Super Bowl LI in February 2017.

At the NFL’s Fall Meeting, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell announced that San Francisco and South Florida will duke it out for the opportunity to host the NFL’s 50th Super Bowl, Super Bowl L, in 2016. Goodell says the losing city will compete with Houston for the chance to host Super Bowl LI.

NFL owners will vote on the two Super Bowl sites during league meetings in Boston next May.

Houston’s bid is being lead by the Texans, the Greater Houston Convention and Visitor Bureau, the Harris County – Sports Authority and Reliant Park.

Texans president Jamey Rootes says Houston should feel good about their chances to host the Super Bowl in 2017.

Steve Carlton http://www.flickr.com/photos/stevencarlton/3939882262/sizes/z/in/photostream/

This Sunday's Super Bowl will showcase two of the league's premier quarterbacks: Green Bay's Aaron Rodgers and Pittsburgh's two-time champion Ben Roethlisberger. But along with that, Super Bowl XLV will also feature former Texas Longhorns and players who made names for themselves in the Lone Star State. Sunday's big game, played in Dallas Cowboys Stadium (or "Jerry World", as some people refer to it) will be a homecoming for some of the players.

Here's our list of Texas football players looking forward to the game of their lives this Sunday.