TABC

Folks drink at the Barton Springs Beer Hall.
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUTX

Debaucherous evening last night? You're probably dealing with veisalgia right now.

More commonly known as a hangover, this unpleasant phenomenon has been dogging humanity since our ancestors first happened upon fermentation.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Texans will be able to have delivery drivers bring alcohol directly from retailers to their doors in time for the holidays.

Spencer Selvidge for KUT

If you're feeling lazy and you're looking for booze this holiday season, you're in luck. The Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission announced Thursday it's going to allow third-party delivery of alcohol from restaurants, liquor stores and grocery stores.

A Zilker Brewing Company employee sells state Rep. Eddie Rodriguez beer to go.
Julia Reihs / KUT

Texas’ “beer-to-go” law went into effect today, allowing the purchase of beer direct from breweries and taprooms.

State Rep. Eddie Rodriguez of Austin bought the first beer to go this morning at Zilker Brewing Company on East Sixth Street. 

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

bill filed late last week in the Texas Legislature could allow liquor stores to sell on Sundays. 

Currently, stores are prohibited from selling then – as well as on Christmas Day, Thanksgiving and New Year's Day. House Bill 1100 from state Rep. Richard Peña Raymond would allow stores to sell from noon to 10 p.m. Sundays.

Robert Young/Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

The Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission is facing tough times. The agency’s acting director quit recently, and several high-level employees were fired after a news investigation revealed spending sprees on out-of-state trips.

Bob Daemmrich for The Texas Tribune

Only weeks into the job, the acting executive director of the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission is calling it quits.

Ed Swedberg’s abrupt and unexpected resignation from the agency, effective Monday, marks the sixth high-level departure since April from the agency that oversees alcohol regulation in Texas. The TABC has been rocked by revelations of lavish spending, mismanagement and regulatory overreach.

Bill Lile/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Walmart sells everything from guns to grapefruit. But right now, it can't sell liquor – at least not in Texas. The mega-retailer is going to court to change that, but liquor store owners are fighting the effort, alongside the state of Texas.

Some of the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission's rules preventing Walmart from selling liquor date back to the end of Prohibition. But the big-box store corporation argues the rules amount to unconstitutional discrimination.

 


Kelly Connelly, KUT News

Even as the population of Texas increased in the past year, overall alcohol consumption went down.

The Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission says there were 49.8 million gallons of beer, wine and spirits sold in March 2012. That dropped last month to 48.3 million gallons.

While beer and wine consumption was down, hard liquor use grew by almost four percent.

TABC Changes What it Means to Be a Beer

Aug 9, 2012
Thomas Hawk, Texas Tribune

Until recently, beer drinkers who took their time to read the labels on their bottles or cans may have encountered some head-scratching fine print concerning Texas.

Underneath the name of Brooklyn Brewery’s Brooklyn Lager, for instance, was the note “In Texas, malt liquor.” Even closer inspection would reveal that the word “beer” did not appear on the label.

The labeling quirks were the result of a law that required all malt beverages (read: beer) containing more than 4 percent alcohol by weight to be labeled as either “ale” or “malt liquor” to be sold in Texas. The same law also prevented any drink with an alcohol content of more than 4 percent from being advertised in Texas as a “beer.” 

“It made for a very awkward label,” said Eric Ottaway, the general manager of Brooklyn Brewery. “Try writing a description without using the word ‘beer.’”