Jennifer Stayton

Host, Morning Edition

Jennifer feels very lucky to have been born and raised in Austin, Texas. An English teacher at her high school, St. Stephen’s Episcopal School, once suggested to the class that they tune in to KUT 90.5 for Paul Ray’s “Twine Time.” She has been a public radio fan ever since.

Her original career path – Psychology – took a back seat to radio after she started volunteering at the Williams College student radio station during her time there.

Jennifer has worked for commercial and public radio stations in news, production, music, and sales in Austin; Syracuse, New York; and Western Massachusetts. She has a Master’s Degree from Syracuse University in Radio-Television-Film. She has won awards from the Syracuse Press Club and Texas Associated Press Broadcasters.

Jennifer has been the local anchor and host of “Morning Edition” on KUT since May, 2004. She is also the co-host of KUT’s “Higher Ed” podcast.

Jennifer serves on the Advisory Committee for KTSW 89.9 at Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas. She is also a member of the Communication Major Advisory Council for Concordia University in Austin, Texas. She is a member of Women Communicators of Austin and serves as a Mentor in the organization.

Her husband Charles, stepdaughter Samantha, and cats Tidbit and Durango are very patient with her early hours and strange schedule!

Ways to Connect

Photo by Jorge Sahueza-Lyon/KUT News

Remember that old adage about what happens when we assume something? (Hint: break the word down into smaller parts and you'll get it!). Seriously, making assumptions can impact how we approach and learn information. Southwestern University President Dr. Ed Burger and I spend this episode of KUT's podcast "Higher Ed" exploring why we make assumptions; how they affect learning and problem-solving; and how we can approach education with a more open mind.

Courtesy of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Texas history is already full of pretty rowdy tales. But one Austin-based author decided to make it a little rowdier with a work of historical fiction about Republic of Texas President Mirabeau Lamar and his rival Sam Houston.

Commencement speeches: Some are boring and not very memorable; some are inspiring and stay with graduates for years to comes. During this 2018 commencement season, Southwestern University President Dr. Ed Burger and I spend the episode of KUT's podcast "Higher Ed" discussing the good, the bad and the memorable from commencement addresses.

The end of the school year is a busy time for students, faculty, staff, and families. Finals exams are looming; seniors may be on the hunt for a job; and many students have to say goodbye to friends and teachers. In this episode of KUT's podcast "Higher Ed," Southwestern University President Dr. Ed Burger and I discuss the origins of stress; the role it can play in education and learning; and how to successfully manage it (both in and out of school).

Julia Reihs/KUT News

A man drove a rented van down a Toronto sidewalk Monday, killing 10 people. Last month, a bomber terrorized Austin with a series of apparently random attacks that killed two people and injured four. These and other incidents we hear about in the news can elicit a variety of emotional responses, including fear.

Lynda Gonzalez for KUT

Update: The Austin City Council approved ECHO's Action Plan to End Homelessness at its April 26 meeting.

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The original story follows.

The number of people in Austin who are homeless has increased by 5 percent since 2017, new figures show.

The Ending Community Homelessness Coalition (ECHO) reports there are 2,147 people of all ages living on Austin's streets, up from 2,036 in 2017.

A college student requested a "Higher Ed" discussion about meaningful student-teacher relationships – both how to form them and how those relationships could impact grades and behavior. In this episode of KUT's podcast Higher Ed, KUT's Jennifer Stayton and Southwestern University President Dr. Ed Burger discuss how students and teachers can best engage each other to ensure that dynamic goes well.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

What kind of job did the media do covering the Austin serial bombings earlier this year? That depends on which media you are talking about.

Asking for help can be difficult or embarrassing sometimes, and for a variety reasons we don't always do it when we should. But the truth is, everyone needs help sometimes, including students - who can occasionally  use a hand with a tricky subject. In this episode of KUT's podcast Higher Ed, KUT's Jennifer Stayton and Southwestern University President Dr. Ed Burger discuss the most effective ways to ask for and use help in education.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Austin City Manager Spencer Cronk has been on the job since Feb. 12. He says the city has a track record of growth that most other cities would envy, but needs to work hard to meet the challenges that growth presents.

One of higher education's biggest challenges in the coming years may be to prepare students to flourish in a world with many careers and positions that don't now exist. In this episode of KUT's podcast Higher Ed, KUT's Jennifer Stayton and Southwestern University President Dr. Ed Burger discuss how higher education can be ready for this new reality.

National Weather Service

The National Weather Service has issued a flash flood warning for Williamson, Caldwell, Hays, Guadalupe, Bastrop, Comal and Travis counties until 1:30 p.m. today.

Earlier this morning, parts of Central Texas saw as much as 1 to 3 inches from an initial band of storms, and the National Weather Service says the affected counties could see an additional 1 to 3 inches of rain through this afternoon.

Students and young scholars may not have had as much time in the classroom, but that doesn't mean their work lacks insight, value and rigor. In this episode of KUT's podcast Higher Ed, KUT's Jennifer Stayton and Southwestern University President Dr. Ed Burger discuss the valuable contributions younger learners can make, and how society can better regard and embrace their thinking.

This episode was originally posted on Oct. 1, 2017.

Sometimes school can feel like a really solitary endeavor. Writing papers and reading are usually done solo. But teachers at all levels of formal education also assign group projects or presentations. In this episode of KUT's podcast Higher Ed, KUT's Jennifer Stayton and Southwestern University President Dr. Ed Burger talk about the pros and cons of learning solo and of working with a group - both in school and beyond.

With so much information available to us so quickly and easily these days, it might feel as if there is just too much to learn. But encountering massive amounts of information is not the same as actually discerning and then learning what is essential. In this episode of KUT's podcast Higher Ed, KUT's Jennifer Stayton and Southwestern University President Dr. Ed Burger discuss information saturation.

Making decisions – large and small – is not always easy. We are called upon to make countless decisions in life, but when do we receive effective tools for doing that? In this episode of KUT's podcast Higher Ed, KUT's Jennifer Stayton and Southwestern University President Dr. Ed Burger discuss how lessons from our formal education can help us make better decisions.

Note: This episode was originally released on Sept. 17, 2017.

Sometimes, a relationship doesn't feel like a good match. That feeling can crop up in personal relationships, as well as in our relationships with schools. In this episode of KUT's podcast Higher Ed, KUT's Jennifer Stayton and Southwestern University President Dr. Ed Burger answer a question from a listener curious about how to know when it is time to move on.

When many people think about blacks in the South, they think about the past – the Civil War and the fight for civil rights. A podcast, debuting today, seeks to move that conversation forward to current issues faced by black Southerners, and specifically black Southern women.

"When I was growing up, I was told, 'You know, there's no such thing as a black cowboy or a black cowgirl," says DaLyah Jones, a KUT reporter and co-host of "Two and Fro." "And I kind of want to change that perception. ... We do have this type of Southern culture that nobody really talks about."

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

A research paper on white reporters covering race argues for more flexibility on one of the basic tenets of journalism: objectivity.

Nate Ryan

Musician Chris Thile made his first appearance on "A Prairie Home Companion" just over 20 years ago when he was 15. Performing live was not new for him; he had been playing the mandolin for about 10 years already.

Long story short: He took over from "Prairie Home" host Garrison Keillor in October last year.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Roxanne Strong works the front desk at the Salvation Army's shelter in downtown Austin and is often the first point of contact for people seeking help. She's passionate about her job and says it brings her "overwhelming joy."

Ten years ago, it was Strong who came to the shelter. At that time, she had been an addict for years.

Hurricane Harvey hit Texas in August, schools along the coast and in Houston were closed for weeks. In this episode of KUT's podcast Higher Ed, KUT's Jennifer Stayton and Southwestern University President Dr. Ed Burger discuss how students, teachers, and schools can rebound when their school year is disrupted.


Courtesy of the Prairie View Interscholastic League Coaches Association

For many communities in Texas, Friday means high school football.

But when Texas high schools were segregated, black athletes didn’t play under Friday night lights. They played on Wednesday and Thursday nights, while white high schools played Friday nights. 


Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Baylor University English professor Greg Garrett researches and writes about the intersection of religion and popular culture. In his most recent book, Living with the Living Dead: The Wisdom of the Zombie Apocalypse, the Austin author explores the current narrative of the zombie apocalypse and the modern threats it stands for.

Some alumni just love the schools they attended and cannot wait to go back for Homecoming and Reunion. Other alumni say "good riddance" as soon as they get their diploma and never want to hear from their schools again. In this episode of KUT's podcast Higher Ed, KUT's Jennifer Stayton and Southwestern University President Dr. Ed Burger discuss what keeps alumni connected to their schools and how social media has impacted that relationship.


Copyright TopFoto/The Image Works

The Great Smog was a pollution calamity that killed 12,000 people in London over five days in December 1952. At the same time, serial killer John Reginald Christie was preying on vulnerable women in the city and killed at least six.

Empathy. Sympathy. We probably think we know what those words really mean, but in truth they are often confused or misunderstood. In this episode of KUT's podcast Higher Ed, KUT's Jennifer Stayton and Southwestern University President Dr. Ed Burger take a closer look at both and how they relate to learning.


A listener wrote in to "Higher Ed" about his decision to pursue a Ph.D. in pure mathematics after studying classical piano performance and working as a pianist. In this episode of KUT's podcast Higher Ed, KUT's Jennifer Stayton and Southwestern University President Dr. Ed Burger discuss becoming a mathematician later in life and the joys and challenges of making a career shift.


KLRU

Ken Burns and Lynn Novick’s documentary The Vietnam War premiered last night on KLRU. It’s a 10-part, 18-hour documentary about that divisive and still-controversial period in American history. To complement that documentary's release, KLRU has created some of its own local programming to examine how the war in Vietnam affected Central Texans.

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