Lucia Benavides

Lucía Benavides/Texas Standard

From Texas Standard:

If you’ve ever traveled outside of Texas for a long period of time you’ve probably started to miss the unique aspects of the Lone Star State: friendly interactions with strangers, those wide-open sunsets – and probably the food. But most places you travel these days, you don’t have to go far to find a Texpat.

Pablo D. Flores/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 2.5)

From Texas Standard:

Forty years ago today, Argentina experienced a military coup that threw out then-president Isabel Perón. What followed was seven years of military dictatorship, where tens of thousands of people "disappeared.”

But they didn’t simply disappear – they were tortured and killed by the militia. The military claimed these people were from violent guerrilla groups, threatening Argentina's democracy, but many were college students, professors, priests, and social workers – anyone who was deemed a threat or spoke out against the Argentine government, a dictatorship that lasted from 1976 to 1983.

Some say human rights violations had been taking place even before the military officially took power.


Image via flickr/greenplasticamy (CC BY-NC 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Mexicans consume more carbonated drinks per person than any other nation in the world, at an average of 36 gallons a year according to experts. That's 40 percent more than the average American.

Photo courtesy Russell Lee Photography Collection at UT-Austin

From Texas Standard:

Paulino Serda was a small ranch owner near Edinburg, Texas, in 1915 when a group of Mexican bandits came through town. They demanded he open the gates that connected the ranches so the group could pass.

Photo via Flickr/texasmilitaryforces (CC BY-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Celebrations for Hispanic Heritage Month begun nationwide on September 15, and will continue until October 15. It’s a period to recognize the contributions of Hispanics and Latinos to the country, and celebrate the group’s heritage and culture. But who exactly is a Hispanic person? And what’s the difference between being Hispanic and Latino?

 


Flickr/cleopold73 (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Just in time for the start of school, The New York Times reports that there’s a shortage of teachers. Across the country, school districts have gone from refusing to renew contracts to scrambling to hire teachers. This shortage is seen particularly in math, science and special education, and it's a result of the layoffs from the recession years, as well as an improving economy in which fewer people are training to be teachers.

The issue is so critical that some systems are allowing new hires to train on the job and bringing in people who are still finishing their teaching credentials. According to the Times, the situation is most critical in Louisville, Nashville, Oklahoma City and Providence. However, Texas also fares low.

Flickr/ Eirik Johan Skeie (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Sarah Millender wasn’t too concerned about her safety when she signed up as a driver four months ago. Today, she spends around 50 hours a week in her car, working full time for both Uber and Lyft. As she begins her Saturday night shift, she picks up a couple headed to dinner. They make small talk, and eventually ask Millender what it’s like being a female driver.

As she begins to tell the couple about her less-than-positive encounters, she mentions that she “didn’t realize how much the comments would get to [her].”

Gage Skidmore via flickr

From Texas Standard

Some say the crowded contest for the 2016 GOP presidential nod is more spectacle than substance. While there are plenty of candidates to cover, the lion’s share of the spotlight has fallen on someone who’s never even held elected office: Donald Trump.

Huffington Post editors say that Trump's run is more entertainment than politics, so they recently announced that there will be no more Trump in the politics section. Instead, they say, news about Trump and his campaign will go straight to the entertainment section.

Ryan Grimm, Washington bureau chief for the Huffington Post, says the online publication has always been a mix of high- and low-brow news. 

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon, KUT News

The Austin City Council is taking steps to limit its role in Federal Secure Communities, a program that relies on partnerships among federal, state and local law enforcement agencies to deport undocumented immigrants. The program has been criticized for detaining and deporting individuals charged with misdemeanors, rather than serious crimes.

On Thursday night, the council voted unanimously to instruct city staff to make amendments to a proposed interlocal agreement with Travis County. The new language would require the Travis County Sheriff's Office to only honor detainer requests from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) when there are judge-issued arrest warrants or probably cause of crime.

The amendments, proposed by Council Member Mike Martinez, were intended to “either minimize the impact of Secure Communities on Austin families, or increase transparency around the program” and its impact.

Veronica Zaragovia/KUT

There seems to be a clear line dividing the Texas governor and lieutenant governor candidates this election year: girls on one side, boys on the other. But these gender differences may be more than trivial. They can affect the candidates’ experiences running for office. Across party lines, women engage in more grassroots campaigning and, according to some women’s organizations, have a harder time asking for money.

Wikimedia Commons

Ridesharing services like Uber and Lyft can now legally operate in Austin.

The Austin City Council passed an ordinance Thursday establishing rules for the so-called transportation network companies (TNCs), and the city will negotiate contracts with the companies to address major issues that arose during the debate on Council Member Chris Riley's ordinance, including insurance for drivers, surge pricing and increasing TNC service to Austin's disabled community.

flickr.com/mrjoro

Fall in Texas is synonymous with the sweet taste of pecans, be it in pies, cookies, or by themselves. And although it may be early in the season, pecan sellers have already begun to set up stands along Central Texas roads.

This year’s early winter freezes, in addition to the ongoing drought, will undoubtedly have some effect on the season’s production rates. But because Texas is large and areas that grow pecans experienced varied weather, the Texas Pecan Growers Association says buyers should expect prices to be about the same this year as last year.

“The crop is not really low. When the crop is really low, the prices usually go much higher, but because there is a decent crop in Texas, they shouldn’t go too high," TPGA Associate Director of Sales and Marketing Blair Krebs said.