Children's Health

Lynda Gonzalez for KUT

Eduardo Labastida just got his first bike. It’s silver with training wheels and a frame that dips low in front of the seat to help him get on and off. His mother, Yamilet Labastida, runs alongside him in their Round Rock neighborhood, helping to push and steady him.

Eduardo pedals with all his might. Every turn is an accomplishment, because he has mitochondrial disease. The disease can make verbal expression difficult, so his mother speaks for him.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Kristie Reeves woke up to her clock blinking 9:43 a.m. She and her husband, Brett Cavaliero, had overslept. Their baby Sophia, or "Ray Ray," hadn't awakened them to be fed, which Kristi usually used as an alarm clock.

The Austin couple scrambled to get ready for work, but other than their oversleeping, Reeves said, it was a typical morning. She walked outside to say goodbye and watched as Cavaliero drove off to take Ray Ray to daycare.

This week, Colorado became the first state to notify families that children who receive health insurance through the Children's Health Insurance Program are in danger of losing their coverage.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

The families of roughly 400,000 children in Texas could be receiving letters from state officials in a matter of weeks, letting them know their health care is ending.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

A federal program that provides health insurance for about 390,000 Texas children must be reauthorized by Congress by the end of the month.