James Comey

In an interview with NPR's Morning Edition, fired FBI Director James Comey defended his controversial decisions during the 2016 campaign and asserted that the reputation of his agency — which operates under near daily siege from the president and his allies — "would be worse today had we not picked the least bad alternatives."

"I saw this as a 500-year flood, and so where is the manual? What do I do?" he said.

Updated at 6 a.m. ET

Former FBI Director James Comey says he believed that the investigation into whether Hillary Clinton sent or received classified email from a private server while she was secretary of state was a "no-win" case for him that would further polarize an already deeply divided electorate.

Gage Skidmore/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

People in Texas and around the nation are waiting to hear from U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who is scheduled to testify Tuesday before the Senate Intelligence Committee. The committee, which is investigating Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election, is expected to ask him about his meetings with Russian officials. Sessions asked that the hearing be open to the public.

Screenshot/PBS News Hour

President Trump held a press conference Friday with Romanian President Klaus Iohannis.

The remarks were Trump's first live, on-camera statements since the damning testimony James Comey gave Thursday before the Senate Intelligence Committee. 

Screenshot via PBS NewsHour

Former FBI Director James Comey testified before the Senate Intelligence Committee earlier today. Comey's testimony addressed his firing at the hands of President Trump and shed light on their relationship in his last days as the chief of the FBI.

Comey accused the White House of "lies, plain and simple" and expressed concern about Trump's attempts to sway the FBI's investigations into the administration's potential Russian ties. 

Now, Trump's personal attorney is responding to the testimony. Watch a livestream of his comments above. 

Screenshot via PBS NewsHour

Former FBI Director James Comey will testify before the Senate Intelligence Committee this morning. Comey was fired on May 9, after leading the FBI's investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election and possible ties between Russian intelligence and associates of President Donald Trump. 

Yuri Gripas/AFP/Getty Images

Former FBI Director James Comey is testifying before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Thursday. Before Comey was fired on May 9, he led the FBI's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election and potential ties between Trump associates and Russia. That probe is now led by a special prosecutor.

Gage Skidmore/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Some Texas Democrats in Washington are suggesting a Trump impeachment. U.S. Rep. Al Green of Houston was the first to call for the president's impeachment on Monday. U.S. Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, also of Houston, and U.S. Rep. Filemon Vela of Brownsville have said it is a possibility.

Texas Republicans, meanwhile, are either waiting to weigh in or are silent.

Shelby Knowles for The Texas Tribune

WASHINGTON — John Cornyn withdrew from consideration to be the next FBI director on Tuesday, saying the "best way I can serve is continuing to fight for a conservative agenda in the U.S. Senate."  

Gage Skidmore/Wikimedia Commons [CC BY-SA 3.0

From Texas Standard:

The talk of Washington is still centered on the news from last week that President Donald Trump fired FBI Director James Comey. Trump cited Comey's handling of the investigation into Hillary Clinton's emails as the reason for his dismissal, but others are worried that the firing may have had something to do with the agency's investigation into possible collusion between Russia and Trump's campaign, during the election.

Gage Skidmore/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

The firing of FBI Director James Comey is not just a matter of domestic politics. For a look at how it could affect foreign policy, Texas Standard host David Brown turns to Jeremi Suri – the chair for Leadership in Global Affairs at the LBJ School of Public Affairs.

From Texas Standard:

May 9, 2017, the day President Trump fired FBI Director James Comey, may go down in history the way Oct. 20, 1973, has. That 1973 date is better known as the “Saturday Night Massacre” – when President Nixon’s attorney general and deputy attorney general resigned. For reaction to Comey's ouster, Texas Standard host David Brown turns to a Texas Democrat and a Texas Republican in Congress.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez

WASHINGTON – The two senators from Texas said Wednesday that President Donald Trump was within the bounds of his authority to fire now-former FBI Director James Comey, even as the move raised concerns from some of their fellow Republicans and virtually all Democrats in the Senate.

Updated at 3:15 p.m. ET.

FBI Director James Comey on Wednesday defended his decision to tell Congress in October that he was revisiting the bureau's investigation into Hillary Clinton's emails.

Testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Comey said he believed revisiting the investigation just before the election — knowing it could affect the outcome — would be really bad, but that not to do so would be catastrophic for the agency's independence. In retrospect, he said, he still believes he made the right choice.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

FBI Director James Comey delivered the keynote address at a symposium on national security challenges at the University of Texas at Austin on Thursday.