Ken Paxton

Gabriel C. Pérez/KUT

From Texas Standard:

Political pundits, pollsters and activists have been saying for a while that the 2018 midterm elections are likely to result in some upheaval in the ranks of incumbent officeholders. Already, in special elections in other states, Democrats have run strong in reliably Republican areas, and here at home, one senator, and several members of Congress face enthusiastic opposition. But statewide officeholders – Republicans Gov. Greg Abbott, Attorney General Ken Paxton and Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller – face somewhat easier paths to reelection. Still, Democrats are campaigning aggressively.

Julia Reihs / KUT

In a little-noticed court filing last month, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton asked a federal judge to get rid of a popular part of the Affordable Care Act in Texas. In particular, his request could affect a part of the law that protects people with pre-existing conditions from being denied health insurance or being priced out of a health plan.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera: O'Rourke/Bob Daemmrich: Cruz

A new poll released Wednesday suggests that U.S. Sen Ted Cruz and U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke, D-El Paso, are in a dead heat.

The poll from Texas Lyceum shows Cruz holding a slim margin over his Democratic challenger in the U.S. Senate race. Among likely voters, Cruz carries 41 percent of the vote compared to O’Rourke’s 39 percent. Nineteen percent of voters said they were undecided.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Austin has endured several legal jabs from the state in the past couple months.

Julia Reihs / KUT

Ken Paxton is taking on the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

The embattled watchdog agency – which was established in the wake of the financial crisis to police financial service providers – is seeking penalties against Mississippi-based payday lender All American Check Cashing, alleging it misled customers.

Paxton and 13 other states filed a brief arguing the CFPB doesn't have constitutional authority to levy penalties.

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