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Texas

Houston Mayor Calls Off Property Tax Hike After Abbott Delivers $50 Million

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Marjorie Kamys Cotera (Abbott)/Pu Ying Huang
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Gov. Greg Abbott and Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner have been in a dispute about state funds for Harvey recovery efforts.

After Gov. Greg Abbott presented Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner a $50 million check for Hurricane Harvey relief Friday, Turner said he would rescind a proposed property tax hike for his city.

The money, which come from the $100 million disaster relief fund appropriated during the last legislative session, will go toward immediate relief needs, such as reconstruction, Abbott and Turner said at a joint news conference in Houston on Friday. Abbott said long-term recovery and preventive measures would be funded by the federal government and the state's savings account, known as the Rainy Day Fund, but not until exact costs for recovery are known.

"The time to use the thrust of the Rainy Day Fund is when the expenses are known," Abbott said. "So the members of the legislature know how best to use the Rainy Day Fund."

Turner had planned to raise property taxes for one year to raise $50 million for hurricane recovery, which would have cost the average Houston homeowner $48. Though the plan drew criticism, Turner said at the time he would not have proposed the tax increase had Abbott called a special legislative session to use the Rainy Day Fund.

The news conference appeared to resolve a weeklong spat between Abbott and Turner. In early September, Abbott said a special session of the Legislature wasn't necessary to deal with the response to Hurricane Harvey, but in a Monday interview with The Texas Tribune, Turner said the lack of immediate state funding for relief efforts was forcing him to push for the tax hike. Abbott responded in a Tuesday news conference, saying Houston already had enough funds for hurricane relief and that if the state were to use Rainy Day money, it would come during the next regular legislative session in 2019.

During the Friday news conference, Abbott said there "is a possibility for a special session" to allocate funds for recovery and prevention once those costs are better known.

"Now that the hurricane winds are calm ... it's time that we begin the process of rebuilding Texas, and that's a tall task," Abbott said. "This is what the state of Texas is for ... We're proud to be here wearing the same jersey working for the same team."

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From The Texas Tribune